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Wednesday, March 27, 2013

March 27, 2013

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DAILY NEWS
W A P A K O N E T A
SPORTS, 1B
ALL-STAR GAME
Wapak basketball players
highlighted in All-Star game
DOW JONES
14,559.65 +111.90
NASDAQ
3,252.48 +17.18
WHEAT
$6.84 +$0.00
CORN
$7.43 -$0.01
SOYBEANS
$14.57 +$0.14
STUDY
Health overhaul to raise claims cost 32 percent
PAGE, 5B
SECRET SERVICE
Obama names director
NATION, 6A
VOLUME 108,
NUMBER 73
State/Region 2A
Records 3A
Opinion 4A
Nation 6A
Readers Choice 7A
Easter Services 9A
Sports 1B
Auto Racing 2B
County Life 4B
Comics 6B
Classifieds 7B
BRUSSELS (AP) — Feel like having
chocolate at Easter in Belgium? Well, send a
letter and really lick that chocolate-flavored
postal stamp.
The Belgian post office released 538,000
stamps on Monday that have pictures of
chocolate on the front but the essence of
cacao oil in the glue at the back for taste and
in the ink for smell.
Belgian stamp collector Marie-Claire
Verstichel said while the taste was a bit
disappointing, “they smell good.”
PHOENIX (AP) — A group of U.S. senators
who will be influential in shaping and negotiating
details of an immigration reform package is
traveling to the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona to
get a firsthand look at issues affecting the region.
See Page 6A
SEOUL, South Korea (MCT) — Sipping an
iced coffee toward the back of a tony cafe in
Seoul’s Gangnam district, where cash flows to
luxury boutiques and plastic surgeons, Kim Ha-
young paused to consider the madness of war.
See Page 7B
INDEX YOUR HOMETOWN QUICK LOOK ODDS & ENDS
See 9A
Best
Hometown
OHIO MAGAZINE’S
Treasurer hired
By KAREN KANTNER
Assistant Managing Editor
Te new treasurer for
Wapakoneta City Schools
says she is looking forward to
the position and ready for the
challenges it will bring.
Angie Sparks, 36, of Wapa-
koneta, was unanimously
hired Tuesday by Wapako-
neta City Schools Board of
Education members for the
position of treasurer with
a starting salary of $71,000
beginning June 1. Her three-
year contract ends July 31,
2016.
Until she takes over the
role, Sparks is working with
treasurer Susan Rinehart,
who is retiring at the end of
May. During Sparks’ training,
she is to be paid $250 per day.
Sparks said she is looking
forward to working with the
board, superintendent and
all the district employees to
“keep Wapakoneta a great
school district for our chil-
dren to be educated in.”
“I am very excited and
ready for the new challenges
it will bring,” Sparks said.
Working 14 years for the
state Auditor’s Of ce in the
region, Sparks said her po-
sition with the state allows
her to transition into the
treasurer’s position with the
background information of a
school district.
“I am able to read reports
generated from the district’s
system, am aware of the vari-
ous functions of a school dis-
trict, and am aware of the vari-
ous state and federal laws per-
taining to district fnances and
thus can help assure compli-
See HIRED, Page 5A
Republican
U.S. Rep. Jim
Jordan talks
to students
in Bill
Dellinger’s
economics
class in the
Performing
Arts
Center on
Tuesday at
Wapakoneta
High School.
Staff photo/Carla
Meyer
Congressman visits WHS
By CARLA MEYER
Staff Writer
With a group of local high school
students in the midst of learning about
investing and the stock market, they re-
ceived a lesson on the free market from
a person who is a college graduate with
an economics degree and a U.S. repre-
sentative.
U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, dis-
cussed federal budget issues and other
challenges on Capitol Hill with stu-
dents in Bill Dellinger’s economics class
Tuesday at Wapakoneta High School.
Te students are competing against
other schools in Te Capitol Hill Chal-
lenge, which is an edition of Te Stock
Market Challenge, and is a program
that matches members of Congress
with students, teachers and schools
benefting from Te Stock Market
Game in their respective district or
state. For the second year in a row, the
seniors at Wapakoneta High School
found themselves paired with Jordan.
“Any economic lesson for young
people is good,” Jordan said of the chal-
lenge. “I was an economics major, and
I caught the bug from my high school
economics teacher.”
See VISITS, Page 10A
W-G students participate in career day
By LANCE MIHM
Staff Writer
W A Y N E S F I E L D
—  Waynesfeld-Goshen Lo-
cal Schools students experi-
enced a new twist to their old
career day format as they par-
ticipated Tuesday in a Career
Fair in the high school gym-
nasium.
Te school district, which
has been hosting a career day
for 15 years in the commu-
nity, typically had students
listen to presentations from
area professionals in diferent
classrooms throughout the
day.
Tis year, the Career Fair
organizers decided to try
something new and closer
to the more traditional ca-
reer fair format. All the pro-
fessionals had booths in the
gymnasium where students
could stop and take advan-
tage of time to ask questions
one-on-one at the 39 difer-
ent stations.
“We wanted to try some-
thing new,” teacher and event
organizer Lori Dyer said.
“With this format, we were
able to get twice as many
speakers for the kids to talk
with. Te kids can come and
talk to the guest and ask what-
ever questions they might
have.”
Te event featured rep-
resentatives from a wide as-
sortment of career and pro-
fessional choices, including
the armed forces, the Lima
Fire Department, real estate
agents, teachers, chemical de-
pendency counselors, teach-
ers, and heath care workers.
Small business owners, coun-
See CAREER, Page 10A
Civility
group
starts
endeavor
By LANCE MIHM
Staff Writer
Sixteen Wapakoneta citizens turned
out Tuesday for a community meeting to
discuss the possibility of forming a group
in Wapakoneta that would take aim at
making the community a more civil place.
“I was very pleased with how the meet-
ing went,” said atorney John Poppe, a
member of the Wapakoneta Area Cham-
ber of Commerce Legislative Commit-
tee, which took the original initiative
to from such a group. “Tere was great
participation
among ev-
eryone that
a t t e n d e d .
Tere was
p o s i t i v e ,
meani ngf ul
di s cus s i on
about inclu-
sion.”
P o p p e
e x p l a i n e d
Legi sl at i ve
Commi ttee
m e m b e r s
d i s c u s s e d
forming such
a group to help improve communication
and acceptance of varying opinions at
public meetings and other forums in the
community. He said he believes political
and other discussions in many areas have
taken a wrong turn.
Many communities in the United
States have created civility projects and
claim to have had success from their ef-
forts in local government. Two of the
most notable have been in Duluth,
Minn., and Oshkosh, Wis. Te mission
and visions of these organizations state
an atempt to “encourage a community
culture of civility that values the opin-
ions and ideas of others in thoughtful
and considerate ways. To promote the
See CIVILITY, Page 5A
Partly
Cloudy
Hi 40
Lo 24
“I don’t think we
realize how much
hurt people carry
with them at times.
I think we need to
remember we need
to listen to both
sides to understand
their position.”
– Marguerite Wallen
Staff photo/Lance Mihm
Dana Dukes-Norton speaks with two
Waynesfield-Goshen students about pro-
grams offered at Apollo Career center.
STATE/REGION
2A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
High pressure will work into the region today with temperatures reaching the 40 degree mark in the region.
Clearing skies will be a trend through the remainder of the week with highs approaching 50 by the weekend.
Vern Doenges compiles this daily historical
column for the Wapakoneta Daily News.
Looking Back
Through the pages of the
Wapakoneta Daily News
75 years ago, March 27, 1938
Merit Badges awarded to boys in Court of Honor
of Boy Scout Troop 9 and 4. First class: Gene
Schnell; Second Class: Dick McClintock, Roland
Killian; Personal Health: Charles Weiher, Neal
Barber, Carl Abe Jr., Mark Winget, Tom Mason, Joe
Weis Jr., Robert Kinninger, Jack Elliott; Fireman-
ship: Charles Weiher, Neal Barber, Richard Jones,
Carl Abe Jr., Tom Schumann, Mark Winget, An-
drew Macke, Harold Homan, John Garrett, Robert
Kinninger, John Anthony, Jack Elliott; First Aid:
Richard Jones; Swimming: Gene Schnell; Car-
pentry: Charles Brandt, Jim Gehlrich; First Aid to
Animals: Tom Mason, Andrew Macke, Jim Geh-
rlich, Harold Horman, Bernard Laux, John Garrett,
Robert Kinninger, John Anthony, Walter Drexler
and Jack Elliott; Pathfinding: Charles Weiher,
Neal Barber, Richard Jones, Tom Mason, Andrew
Macke, Clarence Meyer, Joe Weis Jr., Jim Elliott,
James Madigan, Harold Horman, Bernard Laux,
John Garret, Robert Kinninger, Walter Drexler and
Jack Elliott; Tenderfoot: Richard Harshbarger, Rob-
ert Borges, Harry Heinl, Irvin Kuhn, Paul Garret,
Harold Drexler, Robert Byrne and Paul Nagel.
March 1908: Upon orders of state inspectors
the school board ordered third floor of Williamson
building be no longer used for public gatherings.
50 years ago, March 27, 1963
Bids are due April 8 for the proposed addition
of a fellowship hall to be added to the Uniopollis
Methodist Church. The 26 by 42 foot wood and
block addition that will be added to the west side of
the church will provide besides the hall, 10 class-
rooms, a nursery for use during church services
and restroom facilities. A new hot water heating
system is planned for both structures. Construc-
tion for the new facilities is set for the middle or
later part of April. Rev. George Copus is pastor of
the church.
These top-ranking students of Buckland High
School will represent their school to the final dis-
trict scholarship tests at Ohio Northern University
at Ada. These students were named as a result of
the preliminary tests at the high school: Sandra
Presar, world history; Pauletta Ramga, English 9;
Karen Point, English 10; Barbara Rothe, English
11; Carol Gossard, English 12; Bob Fry, American
History; Barry Aab, advanced algebra; Nancy Fett,
elementary algebra; Juanita Kill, physics; Kim Fritz,
biology; David Fry, general sciences; Janis White-
aker, bookkeeping; Connie Alberson, senior social
studies.
25 years ago, March 27, 1988
These students at Northridge who earned all
As for the fourth six-week grading period were re-
cently honored with a special luncheon, movie and
certificate. The only third grader to attain straight
As was Crystal Ford, who has since moved. Fourth
and fifth graders area Heather Schey, Jenny Folk,
Chad Howe, Brad Lenhart, Nick Jauert, Bryan
Schoeff, Kelli Spinnati, Darcie Kindred, Colby Gil-
lete, Chad McEvoy, Tad Sommers, Elisha Selby and
Andy Simons.
Sixth and seventh grade straight A students at
Northridge include: Andy Graham, Cathy Seitz,
Patrick Mate, Lynn Wachauf, Dawn Tester, Heather
McElroy, Wendy Cearch and Karen Wooley.
Most Improved at Northridge for third, fourth
and fifth gradesL Jeremy Beech, Joey Copeland,
Samantha Pyles, Amy Hoover, Jessica Erb, Jessica
Perez, Willy Crabtree, Wendy Goodwin, Christine
Reese, Steve Hinker, Jim Turner, Julie Denny and
Nate Pohlman. For sixth and seventh grades:
Teresa Cole, Aaron Mason, Molly Kentner, Jenny
Hamel, Shawn Stroh, Scott Fisher, Shane Pfenning,
Paul Fox and Willie Jackson.
The Voice of Auglaize County Since 1905
520 Industrial Drive, Wapakoneta, OH 45895
The Wapakoneta Daily News is open
Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
General business telephone number: (419) 738-2128
Fax number: (419) 738-5352
Publisher Deb Zwez:
(419) 739-3504 - publisher@wapakwdn.com
Managing Editor William Laney:
(419) 739-3515 - wlaney@wapakwdn.com
Advertising Manager Gayle Masonbrink:
(419) 739-3505 - retailadv@wapakwdn.com
Production Manager Nina Laney:
(419) 739-3502 - nlaney@wapakwdn.com
Circulation Manager Beverly Fink:
(419) 739-3501 - circulation@wapakwdn.com
Press Supervisor Mark Croy:
(419) 739-3511
Business Manager Melissa Bartlett:
(419) 739-3503 - mbartlett@wapakwdn.com
After hours news tips:
Please call (419) 739-3515 and leave a message.
Published Monday-Friday evenings and Saturday morning, except holidays,
by Horizon Ohio Publications Inc. ID No. 665840
The publisher reserves the right to reject,
edit or cancel any advertising at any time without liability.
Yearly subscription rates: Carrier delivery, $126;
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Periodicals Postage Paid, Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Postmaster: Send address changes to
Wapakoneta Daily News,
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7-Day Forecast
courtesy of chief
meteorologist Kyle
Adams and the
WLIO weather team
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Man arrested for disorderly conduct
By KAREN KANTNER
Assistant Managing Editor
A Wapakoneta man
was arrested afer becom-
ing belligerent with law
enforcement of cers who
were called twice to his
home Saturday.
Wapakoneta Police
Department of cers
frst responded to the
500 block of Rose Street
shortly afer midnight
for a possible domestic
violence incident. Afer
speaking with three indi-
viduals for an extended
period of time, of cers
determined no domestic
violence had occurred
involving a 35-year-old
woman and lef, accord-
ing to a report.
Te subjects said there
had been no physical con-
tact or threats made.
Less than an hour later,
of cers were again called
to the residence for a male
who was locked out and
under the infuence of al-
cohol.
Perry Clevenger, 43,
became belligerent and
was arrested for persistent
disorderly conduct afer
he refused to comply with
of cers, Clerk Denise
Kohler said.
He was incarcerated in
the Auglaize County Jail.
Manager
helps
apprehend
gas thief
By KAREN KANTNER
Assistant Managing Editor
Te manager of a
Wapakoneta service sta-
tion followed a vehicle
that had driven of with-
out paying for gasoline,
helping lead to the motor-
ist’s apprehension.
Terry Hutchison, 56, of
Lima, reported to Wapak-
oneta Police Department
of cers at 1 p.m. Saturday
that someone had driven
of without paying for
17.6 gallons of gasoline,
worth $64.07.
Wapakoneta Police
Clerk Denise Kohler said
Hutchison, the owner and
manager of Wapak Mara-
thon, 1003 Defance St.,
followed the suspect vehi-
cle north on County Road
25A while on the phone
with the police department
and a Cridersville Police
Department of cer was
able to pull the vehicle over.
Te motorist, whose
name police will not re-
lease at this time, was
cited by the Cridersville
of cer for driving with a
suspended license.
Te 31-year-old Lima
man also faces possible
thef charges from Wapa-
koneta for driving of
without paying for the
gasoline.
W-G career fair
Staff photo/Lance Mihm
A Waynesfield-Goshen student speaks with an Army recruiter about opportu-
nities available in the armed forces Tuesday in the high school gymnasium at
Waynesfield-Goshen Local Schools. The Army recruiter was just one of sev-
eral different options students were able to explore at a career fair.
Woman transported for overdose
By KAREN KANTNER
Assistant Managing Editor
A woman involved in an
alleged domestic violence
incident early Sunday was
transported at 10:15 a.m.
the same day to St. Rita’s
Medical Center, in Lima,
for an overdose.
Wapakoneta Police De-
partment of cers received
a 911 hang-up call at
2:30 a.m. and responded
to the area of Broadway
and Auglaize streets. Te
30-year-old woman of
Blackhoof Street, alleged
she was being assaulted
but during further inves-
tigation afer she was lo-
cated, the woman said she
was not assaulted, accord-
ing to a police of cer’s re-
port.
Te woman was under
the infuence of alcohol at
the time of the frst call.
At 10:15 a.m., her
27-year-old boyfriend
of East Auglaize Street
brought her to the police
station saying she had tak-
en numerous prescription
pills.
Of cers talked to her in
the parking lot, where she
was waiting, and waited
with her until a rescue
squad arrived.
Wapakoneta
Police Department
• Of cers were called
to the 400 block of Ham-
ilton Road at 4:15 p.m.
Saturday for a 44-year-old
female, who threatened to
harm herself.
According to the re-
port:
Te Wapakoneta wom-
an agreed to be transport-
ed to St. Rita’s Medical
Center for treatment.
• A 17-year-old Wapa-
koneta male was injured
and a window and win-
dow blind damaged in an
See WOMAN, Page 5A
Karen Kantner
Asst. Managing Editor
419-739-3517
reporter2@wapakwdn.com
Karen Kantner
Asst. Managing Editor
419-739-3517
reporter2@wapakwdn.com
By KAREN KANTNER
Assistant Managing Editor
Te driver of an SUV
who allegedly caused a
collision Monday night on
Middle Pike Road fed the
seen.
Amanda Goudy, 24, of
Lima, was driving a 2005
Hyundai Santa Fe west
on Middle Pike when she
said she struck a vehicle at-
tempting to make a U-turn
in the road, according to a
trooper’s report from the
Wapakoneta Police De-
partment.
Te asphalt was wet at
the time of the collision at
6:40 p.m. Monday.
Goudy was driving 35
miles per hour in a 55 mph
zone.
Te other vehicle was
described as a green SUV.
Goudy and two pas-
sengers, Nicholas Red-
man, 24, of Lima, and
Gregory Silvia, 23, 608 E.
Auglaize St., Wapakoneta,
complained of neck and
back pain, but they refused
treatment at the scene
from St. Johns EMS, which
responded. All three were
wearing seat belts.
Te vehicle owned
by Ronald Stringfeld, of
Lima, sustained disabling
damage. It was towed from
the scene.
No citations were is-
sued.
Wapakoneta Post
of the Ohio State
Highway Patrol
•  A Minster teen over-
turned the vehicle he was
driving Sunday morning
on Minster Egypt Pike
afer he lost control of his
pickup in the snow.
According to the re-
port:
Paul James Dues, 17,
2021 Minster Egypt Pike,
Minster, was driving a
1991 Chevy S10 east
when he lost control of the
pickup and struck a ditch
on the lef side of the road
at 11:35 a.m.
Te vehicle came to rest
on its top in the feld.
Dues was cited for op-
erating a vehicle without
reasonable control.
He and a passenger,
Danielle Dues, 20, of the
same address, sufered no
apparent injuries. Both
were wearing seat belts.
Te vehicle he was driv-
ing, which belonged to
James Dues, also of the
same address, sustained
disabling damage.
Te family used a trac-
tor to turn the vehicle back
over and towed it home. It
sustained heavy damage to
the top, windshield, doors,
mirrors and front fenders.
Te rear tires were below
the bars.
Paul Dues was driving
30 miles per hour in a 55
mph zone at the time of
the crash.
Te ditch and feld were
not damaged.
RECORDS
Page 3A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Agenda
Thursday: The Mental
Health and Recovery Servic-
es Board of Allen, Auglaize,
and Hardin Counties meets
at 4 p.m. aat 529 S. Elizabeth
St., Lima.
• The Cridersville Village
Council Committee of the
Whole is scheduled to meet
at 7 p.m. in council chambers
at the Cridersville Village Hall.
Monday: The Waynes-
field-Goshen Board of Educa-
tion is scheduled to meet at 6
p.m. in the board room at the
district office.
• The Uniopolis Village
Council meets at 7 p.m. at
council chambers in Uniopo-
lis.
• The Wapakoneta City
Council is scheduled to meet
at 7:30 p.m. at the Wapa-
koneta City Administration
Building, 701 Parlette Court.
• The Salem Township
Board of Trustees meets at 8
p.m. in the township building
in Kossuth.
Tuesday: The Botkins Vil-
lage Council Service Commit-
tee is scheduled to meet at
7 p.m. in council chambers,
111 E. Lynn St., Botkins.
• The Pusheta Township
Board of Trustees meets at 7
p.m. at the township house
in Freyburg.
• The Duchouquet Town-
ship Trustees are scheduled
to meet at 8 p.m. in the
Duchoquet Township house.
• The Logan Township
Trustees are scheduled to
meet at 8 p.m. in the Logan
Township house.
Wednesday: The Auglaize
Soil and Water Conservation
District Board of Supervisors
is scheduled to meet at 8
a.m. at the office on Indus-
trial Drive.
• The Local Emergency
Planning Committee is
scheduled to meet at 10 a.m.
• The Wapakoneta Area
Economic Development
Committee is scheduled to
meet at 11:30 a.m. in the
Chamber of Commerce of-
fice, 30 E. Auglaize St.
• The Botkins Joint
Recreational Board meets at
7 p.m. in council chambers,
111 E. Lynn St., Botkins.
April 4: The Wapakoneta
Tree Commission is sched-
uled to meet at 4 p.m. at the
Wapakoneta City Administra-
tion Building, 701 Parlette
Court.
• The Clay Township trust-
ees are scheduled to meet at
8 p.m. at the Clay Township
House in Gutman.
April 8: The Wapako-
neta City Recreation Board
is scheduled to meet at 4:30
p.m. in the Wapakoneta City
Council conference room
at the Wapakoneta City
Administration Building, 701
Parlette Court.
Here are the Ohio
Lottery selections
for Tuesday:
Mega Millions 3/26
2-33-46-49-51
Mega Ball: 46
Megaplier: 4
Powerball 3/23
17-29-31-52-53
Powerball: 31
Pick 3 Numbers 3/26
2-4-7 (day)
9-0-0 (night)
Pick 4 Numbers 3/26
0-8-8-7 (day)
3-8-3-2 (night)
Pick 5 Numbers 3/26
2-3-8-5-5 (day)
2-6-8-8-2 (night)
Rolling Cash 5 3/26
16-23-36-38-39
Classic Lotto 3/25
1-11-14-19-24-48
Kicker:
5-3-0-2-2-1
The Mega Millions jack-
pot is $34 million.
The Powerball jackpot is
$40 million.
The Rolling Cash 5
jackpot is $110,000.
The Classic Lotto jack-
pot is $31.3 million.
Lottery
In brief
STRONGSVILLE (AP)
— There was no prog-
ress toward a settlement
after striking teachers
in a suburban Cleveland
school district and school
district officials met with
a federal mediator for 12
hours.
Representatives of
the striking Strongsville
teachers and school
board members had the
marathon session with
the mediator Tuesday.
The strike over salary
and working conditions
involves close to 400
teachers and about 6,300
students.
The Plain Dealer
newspaper reports that
this was the fourth
meeting with a federal
mediator since the strike
began on March 4. No
further meetings have
been scheduled.
Teachers were ex-
pected to be back on the
picket lines Wednesday
in the city southwest of
Cleveland.
DAYTON (AP) — An
Ohio fire captain is recov-
ering at a hospital after
he was hit and thrown
20 to 30 feet by a vehicle
that lost control on a
slick roadway.
Dayton fire Capt.
Barry Cron’s condition
was unavailable, but the
fire department said his
injuries are believed to be
non-life-threatening.
The Dayton Daily
News reports that Cron
was speaking to a victim
of a crash who was in a
vehicle on U.S. 35 early
Tuesday.
24 W. Auglaize Street • Wapakoneta, OH • 419.738.3617
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Death Notices
Richard Bowersock, 92
Richard Bowersock,
92, died at 7 a.m. Tuesday,
March 26, 2013, at Rose-
l a w n
Manor,
w h e r e
he had
resi ded
for the past two years.
He was born May 2,
1920, in Salem Township,
Auglaize County, to Viola
McMillen and Grover
Bowersock, who preced-
ed him in death. On July
1, 1940, he married Doro-
tha Irene Smith, who died
Dec. 6, 2005.
Surviving are three
daughters, Konita G.
“Connie” Klaus, of Spen-
cerville, Barbara I. Crites,
of Spencerville, and Lau-
rie E. Ball, of Spencerville.
Services are at 10:30
a.m. Friday at Tomas
E. Baylif Funeral Home
in Spencerville, with the
Rev. Robert King of ciat-
ing. Burial will follow at
Spencerville Cemetery,
with military rites by the
Spencerville Veterans.
Friends may call from 2
to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Turs-
day at the funeral home.
Contributions may be
made to Hartford Chris-
tian Church or Spencer-
ville Veterans Park .
Quinton McLean, 85
Quinton McLean, 85,
of Walled Lake, Mich.,
died at 3:57 p.m. Monday,
March 25, 2013, at Hu-
ron Valley Sinai Hospital,
Commerce Township,
Mich.
Friends may call from 2
to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Friday
at Baylif & Eley Funeral
Home in Wapakoneta.
Other arrangments at
the funeral home are in-
complete.
City of SM names
new parks worker
By MIKE BURKHOLDER
EL Managing Editor
ST. MARYS — A Me-
morial High School grad-
uate has returned to the
city of St. Marys and he
says he hopes to put to
use his more than two de-
cades of parks knowledge
to work improving the
city’s park system.
Tim Boehmer was
hired to fll the position of
parks maintenance super-
intendent, a job that has
been vacant for fve years.
“Some of the goals for
this position is to help us
improve our parks,” St.
Marys Engineering Super-
intendent Craig Moeller
said. “Tim is a certifed
arborist so he’ll help with
the trees, the landscaping
and the lawn care above
and beyond the mainte-
nance. Tim’s responsible
for all the trees in the city
that are inside our right-
of-ways.”
General Services will
continue to provide main-
tenance for the parks.
Moeller will serve as
Boehmer’s immediate su-
pervisor.
Boehmer said he hopes
to continue to improve
upon the aesthetics of the
city’s 11 parks.
“I think it’s very impor-
tant to have good parks,”
Boehmer said. “It’s one of
the frst things people see.
If things are rundown,
they won’t think it’s a nice
place. Public safety is key
with the large trees. If
you are driving through
a town and seeing large
dead wood in high-use
areas, you’d be skeptical
staying there for a long
time.”
Boehmer also will be
charged with taking an
inventory of city trees on
city property and assess-
ing the health of the trees.
“Tere’s a lot that goes
into it,” Boehmer said of
assessing a tree’s health.
“Te most important
thing, as far as safety, is the
location and what’s going
on underneath a tree. For
example, today, I have the
tree crews out at K.C. Gei-
ger Park removing dead
wood from high-use areas
near benches or wherever
people hang out.”
Boehmer previously
worked in Hamilton
County area. He has a
background in metro
parks operations and has
an associate’s degree in
forestry from Hocking
College.
“I’d like to take some of
that knowledge and bring
it back up here,” Boehmer
said. “I’m looking forward
to helping make the parks
continue to stand out.”
Boehmer said he would
welcome any volunteers
groups that want to lend
a hand toward the beau-
tifcation of the city. A
beautifcation and im-
provement day is being
held at 9 a.m. April 6 at
K.C. Geiger Park. Volun-
teers are still being sought
for the event and anyone
with questions can call
419-305-6552.
“We encourage com-
munity involvement,”
Boehmer said. “It would
be nice to get a beter grasp
on inventory — that’s the
best thing to start of with.
Using volunteers, they are
an extension of our arms.”
Boehmer is available
to address local service
groups and schools. Te
city is currently planning
its annual Arbor Day cel-
ebration, which will be
held at 10 a.m. April 26
near the shelterhouse of
High Street.
“Te city is very for-
tunate to have Tim here,”
Moeller said. “We are
striving toward continu-
ing to improve our parks.”
Motorist flees scene
Houses
‘outed’
KENTON (AP) —
Over the pleas of the lo-
cal Amish community, a
northwest Ohio health
board decided to go ahead
with plans to condemn
two newly constructed
Amish homes because
they don’t have required
septic systems for their
outhouses.
More than 100 Amish
turned out Tuesday night
to ask the Kenton-Hardin
County Board of Health
to reconsider the con-
demnation order, which
requires that the homes
be brought into compli-
ance or the families move
out.
Last summer, the
health board said it would
start enforcing rules that
any new home must have
a proper well and septic
system.
Local man arrested
CELINA (AP) — Au-
thorities say a 22-year-old
man has been arrested in
connection with the 2011
slayings of a disabled man
and his daughter at their
farmhouse in western
Ohio.
Te Mercer County
Sherif’s Of ce said Bry-
ant Rhoades was arrested
Tuesday. He is charged
with obstruction of jus-
tice, but sherif’s of cials
haven’t yet discussed the
details of his alleged con-
nection to the slayings.
Authorities found the
bodies of 70-year-old Rob-
ert Grube and 47-year-old
Colleen Grube afer an ap-
parent robbery.
Los Angeles Times editorial
Columnist opinions
Thought for the day
“Ofen the test of courage is not to
die but to live.”
— Vitorio Alferi
Italian dramatist (1749-1803)
Britain’s plan to
regulate the press
goes too far
B
ritain’s three major political par-
ties have agreed on a new system
of regulating newspapers in the
afermath of shocking invasions of pri-
vacy by some tabloid journalists. In this
case, unanimity doesn’t equal wisdom.
Te London-based Index on Censor-
ship was right to call the new system a
“sad day for press freedom in the U.K.”
Te new arrangement will imple-
ment recommendations of a prominent
British judge who conducted an inquiry
into press conduct afer a “phone-
hacking” scandal in which journalists
illegally accessed information from the
telephones of celebrities, politicians and
a kidnapped girl who was later found
dead.
Te commission had proposed a new
regulatory body to oversee Britain’s
newspapers; in the end, rather than
having Parliament create one by statute,
Queen Elizabeth II will issue a charter
establish-
ing a “rec-
ognition
body” that
will certify
a new regu-
latory com-
mission.
Tat
panel in
turn will be
able to di-
rect news-
papers to
publish
corrections
and impose
fnes of up
to a million
pounds for
unethical
behavior.
News-
papers that
choose
not to take
part in the
regulatory
process
will be
subject to
additional
“exem-
plary”
damages
if they lose libel or invasion-of-privacy
lawsuits.
Te use of a royal charter, rather than
a statute, doesn’t alter the fact that the
government is involving itself in regula-
tion of the press. (Actually, Parliament
will be involved in the system because
it will legislate terms under which the
charter can be revised.)
Reporters and editors now must look
over their shoulders not only at the new
regulatory body but also at politicians
who have demonstrated that they are
willing to use the power of government
to rein in the press.
Tese are the same politicians whom
journalists are in the business of cover-
ing.
A measure of humility is appropri-
ate when Americans criticize the legal
and political systems of other countries.
Although Britain lacks a 1st Amend-
ment — or any writen constitution
— it is dramatically more protective of
individual liberties than many societies
with elaborate charters of rights.
It’s also true that tabloid newspapers
in Britain long have engaged in practices
that are anathema to journalists in this
country (and to many in Britain).
Even so, this new system of regula-
tion interferes with the autonomy jour-
nalists need to serve the public. And it’s
an overreaction to the phone-hacking
scandal, which involved alleged viola-
tions of criminal law that already have
resulted in arrests.
Last year, Prime Minister David
Cameron warned against writing press
regulation into the “law of the land.” Yet
that is what Britain is about to do, and
both the press and the British people
will be the worse for it.
Iraq war was
a mistake from
the beginning
One never would have thought,
when this country was raining “shock
and awe” on Baghdad, that politicians
would have litle to say about the 10th
anniversary of the war, which today
seems more in remission than over.
In fact, Agence France-Presse re-
ports that more than 200 people have
been killed in Iraq this month as sec-
tarian violence continues. A rash of car
bombings, likely linked to last week’s
anniversary of the invasion, lef at least
40 Iraqis dead and dozens wounded.
Te peace that the war was supposed
to bring remains missing in action.
Most Americans no longer care,
polls show. Tey believe this nation
paid too high a price — 4,500 soldiers
killed, 30,000 wounded, more than
$2 trillion in expenditures — to fght
a war whose goal kept changing, and
that it received litle in return, certain-
ly not the Middle East stability that
in many respects seems more remote
than in 2003.
Some foreign policy analysts point
out that while toppling the murder-
ous regime of Saddam Hussein was
the right thing to do, the weakening of
Iraq has allowed its biter enemy Iran
to pursue its ambition to become a
regional power.
Tat shouldn’t have been hard to
envision 10 years ago, but U.S. leaders
didn’t let that possibility change their
mind about atacking Iraq. In fact, for-
mer Vice President Dick Cheney still
insists that the Bush administration
made the right decision. “If I had to do
it all over again, I’d do it in a minute,”
he recently told the producers of a
documentary being made about him,
titled “Te World According to Dick
Cheney.”
Te war became unpopular, but “it
was more important to be successful
than it was to be loved,” Cheney said.
“If you want to be loved, go and be a
movie star.” He also still insists that
Iraq tried to buy uranium from Niger
to make weapons of mass destruction,
even though the allegation has been
proved false. “Te only thing (Ni-
ger) had to import was uranium and
goats,” Cheney said. “Iraq had plenty
of goats.”
Cheney’s former boss had the good
sense not to atempt such a vociferous
defense of the indefensible. George
W. Bush has remained silent about
the anniversary. Had he granted an
interview, he no doubt would have
been asked not only about his wrong
assumption on WMD, but also why he
shifed the military focus to Iraq even
though al-Qaida was based in Af-
ghanistan. Of course, the terrorists did
eventually go to Iraq to take advantage
of the instability the war created.
Ten years afer the Iraq war began,
and 15 months afer it was declared
over for this country, no one can call
it a success. Daily life in Iraq remains
a batle. Te Sunni minority that
dominated during Saddam’s reign now
struggles under the Shiite govern-
ment of Prime Minister Nouri al-Ma-
liki, who not only has ties to Iranian
President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad,
but is also said to be providing aid to
embatled Syrian President Bashar
al-Assad. Does it sound like Maliki
is grateful to the United States for its
fght to free Iraq from a despot?
Despite what Cheney says, if this
country had to do it over again, it
certainly should not travel the same
course that led to the bombing of
Baghdad. If nothing else, the Iraq war
should have taught this nation that
you don’t jump into mortal combat
before you know for certain what and
whom you’re fghting for.
From the Philadelphia Inquirer
Why detain
non-violent immigrants?
In recent weeks, Republican law-
makers have slammed the Department
of Homeland Security for releasing
2,228 immigrants from detention cen-
ters around the country, questioning,
among other things, whether murder-
ers, rapists and drug traf ckers were
among those set free.
But while it is unclear whether
Homeland Security’s decision to
release the detainees was prompted by
the austerity requirements of seques-
tration or by political theatrics, what is
certain is that those who were released
didn’t pose an egregious threat to
public safety. More than 70 percent of
those detainees have no criminal his-
tory, according to federal of cials. Te
rest had only misdemeanor convic-
tions, including shoplifing and minor
drug possession.
Frankly, instead of trying to score
political points by exaggerating the
dangers, lawmakers ought to have
asked why these nonviolent immi-
grants were being held in the frst
place, when cheaper and equally efec-
tive alternatives to detention exist.
Te immigrant detention system
on any given day holds approximately
34,000 noncitizens awaiting deporta-
tion hearings. Te Obama administra-
tion has repeatedly said that it wants
to focus detention and deportation
eforts on the “worst of the worst.”
Surely, visa over-stayers, asylum seek-
ers and shoplifers who are believed to
be neither fight risks nor safety risks
do not ft that profle.
Moreover, incarcerating non-vio-
lent immigrants who face civil depor-
tation cases is a strikingly inef cient
way to spend tax dollars. It costs an
average of $122 to $164 a day to de-
tain immigrants in federal custody. In
contrast, alternatives such as super-
vised release or electronic monitoring
carry an average price tag of about $14
a day. More than 95 percent of immi-
grants in such programs showed up for
their fnal court hearing.
No one disputes that immigrants
who commit violent crimes should be
detained. But locking up those with
no criminal history is a waste of both
money and resources.
From the Los Angeles News
Rob Portman
U.S. Senator
B40D Dirksen Senate
Office Building
Washington, D.C., 20510
(202) 224-3353
Sherrod Brown
U.S. Senator
455 Russell Senate
Washington, D.C., 20510
(202) 224-2315
Jim Jordan
4th District Congressman
515 Cannon House
Washington, D.C., 20515
(202) 225-2676
Write your legislators
Freedom of Speech: Reader Opinions and Other Views
OPINION
Page 4A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Publisher: Deb Zwez Managing Editor: William Laney
Letters Policy
This newspaper welcomes let-
ters on any public issue. Letters
should be 500 words or fewer in
length and are subject to editing for
grammar and clarity. Letters that
are libelous in nature will not be
published. Letters should be typed
or neatly printed. Submissions must
be signed and include the writer’s
address and phone number for veri-
fication.
Send letters to: Letters to the
Editor, Box 389, Wapakoneta, Ohio
45895, or via e-mail to: blaney@
wapakwdn.com.
Antics of the hard
right are just wrong
A
re there lunatics among us? Te
word traces back to the Latin
word luna, for moon, from the
old superstition that the moon could
make people crazy.
Tere is increasing evidence that an
important part of the Republican Party
is crazy. Unfortunately, the part of the
Republican Party — which could prop-
erly be called the “hard right” — that
may be exhibiting signs of insanity is the
part that on some issues presently con-
trols the House of Representatives, and
thus has the power to block all forward
movement by the federal government.
One sign of insanity is when you
begin to lose touch with concrete pieces
of information and evidence around
you. It’s sometimes called denial. Ex-
ample: Congress people with tea party
origins maintain that cuting taxes on
the wealthy will create jobs. Tat’s the
reason they give for reducing the tax
burden on the richest among us. But
they don’t adduce serious economic
research to substantiate this belief. A lot
of their tax reduction ideas, however,
are really aimed at reducing the size of
government, which they consider inap-
propriate in both scale and role. Hence
their willingness to let the sequester
take efect.
On the critical issue of global warm-
ing, the hard right says either that
climate change is a hoax or they don’t
believe it’s man-made.
But the considered opinion of an
overwhelming majority of scientists
generally and of climate experts specif-
cally is that climate change is real and
that human activity is causing this par-
ticular dangerous and sharply accelerat-
ing round of global warming.
Another sign of mental instability is
escapism — when you take refuge in
fantasy rather than face reality.
Te hard right’s proposals for dealing
with health care are a good example of
this.
One Republican congressman —
who is a physician no less — Rep. Paul
C. Broun from Georgia, wants to freeze
some health system expenditures by the
federal government at the present level.
Just freeze them — not slow their rate
of growth, not reform the system.
Freeze costs and send the money
in bulk to the states to deal with the
problem.
Tis is a reckless — perhaps even
sociopathic — idea, in a world where
the number of aging Americans, and
therefore the number needing health
care, is growing.
To atempt to reform the health
care system and slow the cost spiral
makes sense; but to freeze expenditures
arbitrarily is like amputating a leg rather
than reseting the broken bone.
Troughout history there have been
wacky movements. Te Luddites in
England during the early 19th century
went around smashing machines with
sledgehammers as a way of resisting the
Industrial Revolution.
Te emergence of an energetic hard
right movement in this country comes
at an unfortunate moment of weakness
for the United States.
We are not united behind respon-
sible, growth-focused economic poli-
cies, and the international order is being
reshaped.
Te Atlantic institutions that domi-
nated the world since World War II
are being supplanted by a new global
system in whose formulation the United
States may not play a large role because
of its political paralysis.
And because the American political
system is built on checks and balances,
a group that is so dominant in one
house of the Congress can gum up the
works prety badly on almost any issue
it chooses.
I don’t think any of us can say with
certainty if the antics of the hard right
are a permanent and dangerous threat to
the Republic, or just a lunar phase that
will pass.
But there’s a lot riding on the answer
to that question.
Peter
Goldmark
Newsday
In Goldmark’s Opinion ...
I don’t think any of us can say if
the antics of the hard right are
a permanent and dangerous
threat to the Republic, or just a
lunar phase that will pass.
POINTS TO PONDER
POINT 1 — The
London-based Index on
Censorship was right
to call a new system
to regulate England’s
newspapers as a “sad day
for press freedom in the
U.K.”
POINT 2 — A speccial
panel will be created
to direct newspapers
to publish corrections
and to impose fines of
up to a million pounds
for unethical behavior.
Newspapers that choose
not to take part in the
process will be subject
to additional “exemplary”
damages if they lose libel
or invasion-of-privacy
lawsuits.
POINT 3 — The prime
minister warned about
writing such a regulation
into the law of the land.
Great Britain will be the
worse for it.
Hired From Page 1A
5A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Woman From Page 2A
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CVS Caremark Corporation CVS 55.29 -0.01 (-0.02%)
Applied Materials, Inc. AMAT 13.41 +0.09 (0.68%)
AT&T Inc. T 36.74 +0.35 (0.96%)
General Motors Company GM 28.15 -0.01 (-0.04%)
Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. BBBY 64.66 +0.47 (0.73%)
Bob Evans Farms Inc BOBE 42.09 +0.47 (1.13%)
BP plc (ADR) BP 42.32 +0.36 (0.86%)
Bristol Myers Squibb Co. BMY 40.68 +0.42 (1.04%)
Cisco Systems, Inc. CSCO 20.84 -0.01 (-0.05%)
Citigroup Inc. C 44.83 +0.34 (0.76%)
Dell Inc. DELL 14.50 -0.01 (-0.07%)
E I Du Pont De Nemours... DD 48.97 -0.14 (-0.29%)
Duke Energy Corp DUK 70.95 +0.67 (0.95%)
EMC Corporation EMC 23.75 +0.01 (0.04%)
Emerson Electric Co. EMR 55.49 -0.34 (-0.61%)
Exxon Mobil Corporation XOM 90.13 +1.11 (1.25%)
Fifth Third Bancorp FITB 16.41 +0.17 (1.05%)
Ford Motor Company F 13.31 +0.02 (0.15%)
General Electric Company GE 23.12 -0.12 (-0.52%)
The Goodyear Tire &... GT 12.83 +0.17 (1.34%)
Health Care REIT, Inc. HCN 66.93 +0.73 (1.10%)
The Home Depot, Inc. HD 70.05 +0.58 (0.83%)
Honda Motor Co Ltd (ADR) HMC 38.60 +0.05 (0.13%)
Huntington Bancshares... HBAN 7.47 +0.12 (1.63%)
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Johnson & Johnson JNJ 80.85 +1.17 (1.47%)
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Lancaster Colony Corp. LANC 76.71 +1.42 (1.89%)
Lowe’s Companies, Inc. LOW 38.22 +0.10 (0.26%)
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Merck & Co., Inc. MRK 44.39 +0.70 (1.60%)
Microsoft Corporation MSFT 28.15 -0.01 (-0.04%)
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Nokia Corporation (ADR) NOK 3.30 +0.04 (1.23%)
Oracle Corporation ORCL 31.53 +0.28 (0.90%)
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PepsiCo, Inc. PEP 78.92 +1.09 (1.40%)
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The Procter & Gamble... PG 77.40 +0.72 (0.94%)
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Sprint Nextel Corporatio... S 6.05 +0.02 (0.33%)
Time Warner Inc TWX 56.91 +0.37 (0.65%)
Texas Instruments Inc. TXN 35.09 +0.61 (1.77%)
U.S. Bancorp USB 33.68 +0.21 (0.61%)
Verizon Communications... VZ 49.48 +0.32 (0.65%)
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. WMT 74.77 -0.08 (-0.11%)
Walgreen Company WAG 47.57 +1.38 (2.99%)
The Walt Disney Company DIS 56.63 +0.42 (0.75%)
Wells Fargo & Co WFC 37.30 +0.09 (0.24%)
This data is the previous day’s closing price and should be used for
informational purposes only. The accuracy of these details is not warranted.
The Associated Press
Today is Wednesday, March 27, the 86th day of 2013.
There are 279 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On March 27, 1513, Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de
Leon sighted present-day Florida.
On this date:
In 1625, Charles I acceded to the English throne upon
the death of James I.
In 1794, Congress approved “An Act to provide a Naval
Armament” of six armed ships.
In 1836, the first Mormon temple was dedicated in
Kirtland, Ohio.
In 1912, first lady Helen Herron Taft and the wife of
Japan’s ambassador to the United States, Viscountess
Chinda, planted the first two of 3,000 cherry trees given as
a gift by the mayor of Tokyo.
In 1933, Japan officially withdrew from the League of
Nations.
In 1942, American servicemen were granted free mailing
privileges.
In 1958, Nikita Khrushchev became Soviet premier in
addition to First Secretary of the Communist Party.
In 1964, Alaska was hit by a powerful earthquake and
tsunamis that killed about 130 people.
In 1968, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin (gah-GAH’-
rihn), the first man to orbit the Earth, died in a plane crash.
In 1973, “The Godfather” won the Academy Award for
best picture of 1972, but its star, Marlon Brando, refused
to accept his Oscar for best actor. Liza Minnelli won best
actress for “Cabaret.”
In 1977, 583 people were killed when a KLM Boeing
747, attempting to take off, crashed into a Pan Am 747 on
the Canary Island of Tenerife.
In 1980, 123 workers died when a North Sea floating oil
field platform, the Alexander Kielland, capsized during a storm.
In 2003, Serbian police killed two major suspects in the
assassination of Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic. Russia’s
Evgeni Plushenko won his second World Figure Skating
Championships title, edging American Tim Goebel at the
MCI Center in Washington D.C. Pulitzer Prize-winning play-
wright Paul Zindel died in New York at age 66.
In 2008, The Pentagon said Defense Secretary Robert
Gates had ordered a full inventory of all nuclear weapons
and related materials after the mistaken delivery of ballistic
missile fuses to Taiwan.
In 2012, A JetBlue Airways captain ran through the
cabin of a New York-to-Las Vegas flight yelling about reli-
gion and terrorists before he was locked out of the cockpit,
then tackled and restrained by passengers. (Clayton Osbon
was charged with interference with a flight crew; he was
found not guilty by reason of insanity.) The leaders of South
Korea, the United States and China issued stark warnings
about the threat of nuclear terrorism during the final day
of a nuclear summit in Seoul that was upstaged by North
Korea’s long-range rocket launch plans. Award-winning
poet Adrienne Rich, 82, died in Santa Cruz, Calif. Art critic
Hilton Kramer, 84, died in Harpswell, Maine.
Today’s Birthdays: Former newspaper columnist Anthony
Lewis is 86. Dance company director Arthur Mitchell is 79.
Actor Julian Glover is 78. Actor Jerry Lacy is 77. Hall of Fame
racer Cale Yarborough is 74. Actor-director Austin Pendleton
is 73. Jazz musician Dave Koz is 50. Movie director Quentin
Tarantino is 50. Rock musician Derrick McKenzie (Jamiro-
quai) is 49. Rock musician Johnny April (Staind) is 48.
Actress Talisa Soto is 46. Singer Mariah Carey is 43. Rock
musician Brendan Hill (Blues Traveler) is 43. Actress Eliza-
beth Mitchell is 43. Actor Nathan Fillion is 42. Hip-hop singer
Fergie (Black Eyed Peas) is 38. Actress Megan Hilty is 32.
Actress Emily Ann Lloyd is 29. Actress Brenda Song is 25.
Today in History
• Originally from Rocky River, I’ve lived in
Wapakoneta almost 30 years.
• I’m the vice president for business development for
Metokote
• I enjoy golf, NASCAR and soccer
• Most people would be
surprised to learn I love
the rodeo
• My dream vacation
is on Marco Island, FL,
with my family.
• My wife, Lisa, is my
hero
• The craziest thing I
ever did was fly a WWII
jet fighter (it was a gift
from my wife)
• What I like best about
Wapakoneta is that it’s
a small town and we
are safe here
I am
Jon Barrett
and
I am Jon Barrett
I AM WAPAKONETA
Towing You Out of
Trouble Since 1926
We hope you never get stuck with car trouble,
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13. S. BLACKHOOF ST.
419-738-8188
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
EdwardJones

Jeff Overberg
Financial
Advisor
404 Hamilton Rd.
Wapakoneta, OH
419-738-9658
800-995-0247
1103 Gardenia Dr.
Suite 1
Wapakoneta, OH
419-738-4849
866-738-4849
Chad F. Metzger
Financial
Advisor
ance with them,” Sparks
said.
As an auditor for the
state, Sparks said her main
focus was determining that
fnancial statements were
not materially misstated,
meaning that she per-
formed tests to make sure
revenues and expenditures
were posted to the proper
accounts. She also ensured
that entities were in com-
pliance with various local,
state and federal laws.
Working alongside
Rinehart for approximate-
ly the next two months
should help Sparks beter
understand the daily intri-
cacies of the job, which she
was not exposed to as an
auditor, Sparks said. She
expects it to help tremen-
dously as she works to gain
a beter understanding of
school fnances.
Sparks said she was
ready for a new challenge
and prepared herself —
by taking two required
classes and training for
300 hours
with Rine-
hart in 2012
— when
she heard of
several area
treasurers re-
tiring .
“I’m ready
to be at
one place,”
Sparks said.
“I’m ready
for diferent
chal l enges,
all the new
adventures they will bring
and the new people I will
meet. I am ready to be able
to focus on one govern-
ment entity.”
Board President Eric
McKinniss said Sparks
was recommended for the
position by a commitee,
which included represen-
tatives from the district’s
certifed and classifed staf
and the
c o m m u -
nity. She
was select-
ed afer an
i n- dept h,
st atewi de
search.
“We did
i nter vi ew
p e o p l e
from difer-
ent areas,”
McKinniss
said, shar-
ing they
were fortunate to have
found a local person with
Sparks’ skills and back-
ground who is invested in
the district.
“She did well through-
out the process and we are
glad to get her on board,”
McKinniss said. “Susan
will be hard to replace re-
gardless, but we feel Angie
will be able to step up to
the plate and quite frankly
be around for quite some
time.”
Te board president
thanked all those who
helped and all the time
they gave to the process
of hiring a new treasurer,
one of two positions board
members select.
Superintendent Keith
Horner said he looked
forward to working with
Sparks.
Sparks and her hus-
band, Mike, have two
daughters, Hanna and Au-
drey, who atend Wapako-
neta Elementary School.
She graduated from Bot-
kins High School and
Bluf on College and has
lived in Wapakoneta since
2001.
incident being investigat-
ed for criminal mischief.
According to the re-
port:
Dustin Hamilton, 31
Riverside Drive, sufered
apparent minor injuries
from the incident, which
occurred at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, and was report-
ed by Steven Hamilton,
48, of the same address.
An acquaintance being
investigated as a suspect is
a 16-year-old Wapakoneta
male.
• A 15-year-old Crid-
ersville girl was taken to
a juvenile detention cen-
ter in Troy afer she was
found operating a vehicle
at 2 a.m. Sunday at the
intersection of North and
North Water streets.
According to the re-
port:
Te 2002 Chrysler
300 she was driving was
stopped for multiple vio-
lations.
Te girl was in viola-
tion of her probation.
• An of cer witnessed
a dispute between a hus-
band and wife and then
found out the 28-year-old
woman had broken a win-
dow to their trailer afer
she couldn’t get inside.
According to the re-
port:
Te woman told the
of cer she broke the win-
dow at 1:15 a.m. Sunday.
Te couple do not live
together and the woman
lef the residence.
• A home was found in
disarray and a dog missing
at 11:40 p.m. Monday at 8
Summerplace Drive.
According to the re-
port:
Diane Miller, 52,
10635 Winemiller Road,
reported the incident at
the home where Elizabeth
Miller, 22, lives.
Police Clerk Denise
Kohler said it appeared
someone had entered the
trailer and lef it in disar-
ray. When the resident
arrived home, she found
it that way and said the
damage occurred afer 4
See WOMAN, Page 10A
Civility From Page 1A
principals of civility in ev-
eryday life through educa-
tion, imitation, and com-
munity engagement.”
Wapakoneta Mayor
Rodney Metz said he be-
lieved a similar project
would be benefcial in
Wapakoneta and that he
planned to stand behind
the group’s eforts.
“It’s about education
and being accessible,” Metz
said. “Government and ci-
vility can beneft from this
project. I had an example
of this just a short time ago.
Someone approached me
about the East Auglaize
Street project and was up-
set about some of the trees
coming down and other as-
pects of the project.
“As soon as I explained
to her the whole project
and what was going to be
done, she was thrilled,”
the mayor said. “We need
to have more open lines of
communication.”
Friendly discussion
dominated the meeting,
with some of discussion
involving a checkered
past in the community in-
cluding the once-strong
presence of the Klu Klux
Klan in the area.
Many said the com-
munity has made great
strides in its civil-
ity toward others, but the
amount identifed by the
group varied in degree.
One atendee dis-
cussed an incident where
she brought her niece,
who is black, to the com-
munity swimming pool.
“I would have to say
Wapak was fantastic, never
once did anyone say a word
or make any kind of com-
ment,” the woman said.
Another atendee said,
“I have heard lots of nega-
tive comments about ‘for-
eigners’ taking over our
businesses in town.”
While the degree of the
problem was not a con-
sensus, all agreed that the
community would beneft
from a civility project in
Wapakoneta.
“I see it as a need na-
tionally,” Wapakoneta res-
ident Marguerite Wallen
said. “We are not as kind
as we used to be. How do
you solve any problems?
We need to be kinder to
each other.
“I don’t think we real-
ize how much hurt people
carry with them at times,”
she said. “I think we need
to remember we need to
listen to both sides to un-
derstand their position.”
Inclusion of all com-
munity members was also
discussed, predominantly
on certain neighborhoods
being lef out. Many of the
neighborhoods discussed
were areas with subsi-
dized housing.
“You have to think
there would be more
community involvement
if we reached out to these
people,” Poppe said.
Poppe said the Execu-
tive Commitee will meet
again and another com-
munity meeting would
likely be scheduled in four
or fve weeks.
“We will discuss the
results of the community
meeting and see what di-
rection we want to go,”
Poppe said.
I’m ready
for different
challenges, all the
new adventures
they will bring and
the new people I
will meet.
— Angie Sparks
NATION
6A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
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Police reports in
Tucson rampage
are released
PHOENIX (AP) — Hun-
dreds of pages of police
reports in the investigation
of the Tucson shooting
rampage that wounded
former Rep. Gabrielle Gif-
fords are being released
Wednesday, marking the
public’s first glimpse into
documents that authorities
have kept private since the
attack more than two years
ago.
The Pima County
sheriff’s department will
release an estimated 2,700
pages of records from the
January 2011 shooting at
a meet-and-greet event
outside a grocery store
that killed six people and
wounded Giffords and 11
others.
The documents include
transcribed interviews with
witnesses, various police
reports and other records,
and could provide new
insight into how the shoot-
ing occurred.
News organizations
seeking the records were
repeatedly denied the
documents in the months
after the shooting and
the arrest of 24-year-old
Jared Lee Loughner, who
was sentenced in Novem-
ber to seven consecutive
life sentences, plus 140
years, after he pleaded
guilty to 19 federal
charges.
U.S. District Judge
Larry Burns had prevented
the sheriff’s department
from releasing the records
in response to a request
from The Washington
Post, ruling in March 2011
that Loughner’s right to a
fair trial outweighed what-
ever disclosures might be
authorized under state law.
Last month, Burns
cleared the way for the
release of the records after
Star Publishing Company,
which publishes the Ari-
zona Daily Star in Tucson,
had sought their release.
The judge said Lough-
ner’s fair-trial rights are
no longer on the line now
that his criminal case has
resolved.
Loughner’s guilty plea
enabled him to avoid the
death sentence.
In brief
Obama names Secret Service director
WA S H I N G T O N
(AP) — President Barack
Obama on Tuesday
named veteran Secret Ser-
vice agent Julia Pierson as
the agency’s frst female
director, signaling his de-
sire to change the culture
at the male-dominated
service, which has been
marred by scandal.
Pierson, who most
recently served as the
agency’s chief of staf, will
take over from Mark Sul-
livan, who announced his
retirement last month.
Te agency faced intense
criticism during Sullivan’s
tenure for a prostitution
scandal during prepara-
tions for Obama’s trip to
Cartagena, Colombia, last
year.
Te incident raised
questions within the
agency — as well as at the
White House and on Cap-
itol Hill — about the cul-
ture, particularly during
foreign travel. In addition
to protecting the presi-
dent, the Secret Service
also investigates fnancial
crimes.
“Over her 30 years of
experience with the Se-
cret Service, Julia has
consistently exemplifed
the spirit and dedication
the men and women of
the service demonstrate
every day,” Obama said
in a statement announc-
ing Pier-
s o n ’ s
appoint-
m e n t ,
w h i c h
does not
requi re
S e na t e
conf i r -
mation.
Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napoli-
tano also praised Obama’s
“historic decision” to
name Pierson as the ser-
vice’s frst female director.
Pierson, 53, has held
high-ranking posts
throughout the Secret
Service, including deputy
assistant director of the
of ce of protective opera-
tions and assistant direc-
tor of human resources
and training. She has
served as chief of staf
since 2008.
Tat same year, Pierson
was awarded the Presiden-
tial Meritorious Executive
Award for superior per-
formance in management
throughout her career.
She joined the Secret
Service in 1983 as a spe-
cial agent and previously
worked as a police of cer
in Orlando, Fla.
“Julia is eminently
qualifed to lead the
agency that not only safe-
guards Americans at ma-
jor events and secures our
fnancial system, but also
protects our leaders and
our frst families, includ-
ing my own,” Obama said.
“Julia has had an exem-
plary career, and I know
these experiences will
guide her as she takes on
this new challenge to lead
the impressive men and
women of this important
agency.”
Tirteen Secret Service
employees were caught
up in last year’s prostitu-
tion scandal. Afer a night
of heavy partying in the
Caribbean resort city of
Cartagena, the employees
brought women, includ-
ing prostitutes, to the ho-
tel where they were stay-
ing.
McCain, others tour border
Petraeus:
Sorry
for affair
LOS ANGELES (AP)
— In his frst public
speech since resigning
as head of the CIA, Da-
vid Petraeus apologized
for the extramarital afair
that “caused such pain for
my family, friends and
supporters.”
Te hero of the Iraq
and Afghanistan wars
struck a somber, apolo-
getic tone as he spoke to
about 600 people, includ-
ing his wife and many
uniformed and decorated
veterans, at the Univer-
sity of Southern Califor-
nia’s annual ROTC din-
ner on Tuesday.
“I know I can never
fully assuage the pain that
I inficted on those clos-
est to me and a number
of others,” Petraeus said.
Petraeus has remained
largely in seclusion since
resigning afer the extra-
marital afair with his bi-
ographer was disclosed.
His lawyer, Robert B.
Barnet, has said Petraeus
spent much of that time
with his family.
PHOENIX (AP) —
A group of U.S. senators
who will be infuential in
shaping and negotiating
details of an immigration
reform package is travel-
ing to the U.S.-Mexico
border in Arizona to get a
frsthand look at issues af-
fecting the region.
Republican Sens. John
McCain and Jef Flake of
Arizona were expected to
tour the border Wednes-
day with Democratic
Sens. Chuck Schumer of
New York and Michael
Bennet of Colorado. Tey
are all members of the so-
called Gang of Eight — a
bipartisan group that has
spent recent weeks trying
to craf proposed immi-
gration legislation.
Te trip comes as Con-
gress is in recess and as
the lawmakers wrap up a
bill designed to secure the
border and put 11 million
illegal immigrants on a
path to citizenship. Presi-
dent Barack Obama has
urged Congress to pass
immigration reform this
year, and border security
is critical to McCain and
other Republicans who
contend that some areas
along the border are far
from secure.
“I wish every member
of the United States Sen-
ate and Congress could
see the border,” McCain
told reporters in Phoenix
on Monday. “Only when
you can see the expanse,
the dif culties and the
challenges of the border,
can you really appreciate
the need for our border
security.”
With top Republicans
and Democrats focused
on the issue, immigration
reform faces its best odds
in years. Te proposed
legislation will likely put
illegal immigrants on a
13-year path to citizen-
ship and would install
new criteria for border
security, allow more high-
and low-skilled workers
to come to the U.S. and
hold businesses to tough-
er standards on verifying
their workers are in the
country legally.
McCain sought to
lower expectations for
the bill Monday during a
town hall in Phoenix. He
told immigration activists
they wouldn’t be com-
pletely happy with the
measure and warned that
the group must overcome
dif cult disagreements.
“We’ve made progress
in a number of areas that
I am encouraged by, but
there are still areas that we
are not in agreement,” he
said.
McCain said the law-
makers had reached an
agreement on protec-
tions for young illegal im-
migrants brought to the
country as children and
on visas for workers, but
declined to provide spe-
cifcs.
Reports indicate that
the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce and the AFL-
CIO, negotiating through
the Gang of Eight sena-
tors, had reached signif-
cant agreement Friday
on a new visa program
to bring up to 200,000
lower-skilled workers a
year to the country. Te
groups did not reach con-
sensus on how much the
workers would be paid.
With a rifle slung over
his shoulder, Bob
Maupin gazes towards
Mexico over a fortified
fence he built along the
border to discourage
illegal immigrants
from trampling over
his property. His 250-
acre ranch is about
65 miles east of San
Diego. Since the U.S.
Government erected an
even higher steel fence
parallel to his he says
he hasn’t been bothered
as much by northbound
Mexican migrants or drug
smugglers.
Pierson
CPA
Chiropractor
Secretary
Restaurant Server
Electrician/Where
Teacher
Administrator
EMT
Pediatrician
Physician
Dentist
Nurse
Firefighter
Law Enforcement Officer
Sales Clerk
Car Salesperson
Bank Teller
Newspaper Carrier
City Employee
County Employee
Barber/Where
Attorney
Financial Advisor
Insurance Representative
Veterinarian
Mechanic
Pet Groomer
Hair Stylist
Real Estate Agent
Nail Technician
Bartender/Where
Auctioneer
Coach/Where
Eye Doctor
Funeral Director
Hamburgers
Kid’s Meal
Coffee
Breakfast
Chinese
Fish
French Fries
Lounge
Steaks
Pizza
Milkshakes
Sandwiches
Best Service
Best Delivery
Italian Food
Chicken
Seafood
Donuts
Salads
Mexican
Desserts
Overall Fast Food
All-u-can-eat Buffet
Atmosphere
Best Place to take a Date
Place For Business Lunch
Drive-through Window
Family Dining
Healthy Menu
Wings
Produce
Dairy
Frozen Foods
Deli
Bakery
Meats
Employees
Customer Service
Manager
Overall
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Reader’s Choice 520 Industrial Drive Wapakoneta, OH 45895
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and you could win
Auto Parts Dealer
New Car Dealer
Used Car Dealer
Heating/Cooling Service
Financial Institution
Finance Company
Auto Garage
Body Shop
Barber Shop
Beauty Salon
Building Supply
Day Care
Carpet Dealer
Cable Service Provider
Dry Cleaning
Florist
Garden Center
Gift Shop
Plumbing Service
Roofing Service
Hotel/Motel
Assisted Living Facility
Overall Industry
Picture Frames/Framing Shop
Radio Station
Bridal Service
Hardware Store
Theater
Furniture Store
Computer Dealer
Exercise Establishment
Photo Studio
Real Estate Agency
Golf Course
Shoe Repair
Transmission
Insurance Provider
Lawn & Garden Dealer
Muffler Repair
Medical Clinic
Service Station
Women’s Clothing
Electronics Dealer
Tanning Salon
Video Rentals
Discount Store
Electrical Service
Travel Agency
Pet Supplies
Law Firm
Carpet Cleaners
Cellular Phone Co.
Dance School
Book Store
Jeweler
Agriculture Dealer
Hobby Shop
Kennel/Pet Care
Lawn Maintenance
Snow Removal
Security/Alarm Dealer
Jewelry Store
Landscaping
Eye Clinic
Paint Dealer
Pharmacy
TV Station
Convenience Store
Antique Dealer
Men’s Clothing
Children’s Clothing
Appliance Dealer
Tire Dealer
Shoe Store
Dentist’s Office
Contractor
Sporting Goods
Butcher
Car Wash
Caterer
Internet Service Provider
Credit Union
Department Store
Mortgage Lender
Appliance Repair
Funeral Service
Printing Service
Rental Service
Nursing Home
Pool Supply/Service
Consignment Shop
Health Food Store
Hospital
8A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
1 of 5 Gift Certificates!
$100 Wapak Marathon Gas Card
$50 Astro Lanes • $50 Allison's Custom Jewelry
$50 Lima Bargain Center
VOTE
and you could win
9A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Holy Week & Easter Services
Palm Sunday, March 24
th
8:15 & 10:15 a.m.
Maundy Thursday, March 28
th
7:00 p.m. Worship Service
Easter Sunday, March 31
st
Easter Potluck 9 a.m.
8:15 a.m. & 10:15 a.m.
St. Paul United Church Of Christ
101 SOUTH PERRY STREET,
WAPAKONETA
419-738-2215
www.stpaulucc.com
You are the light of the world.
Let your light shine...
Matthew 5:14-16
Come Join Us!
JOIN US
HOLY WEEK
Services
FIRST ENGLISH
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Blackhoof & Mechanic Streets
Wapakoneta 419-738-3911
www.myfelc.com
MAUNDY THURSDAY
March 28, 7:00 p.m.
Joint Service at St. Paul’s UCC
with Holy Communion
GOOD FRIDAY
March 29, 7:00 p.m.
Joint Service at St. Marks Lutheran Church
EASTER SUNDAY
March 31
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion Service
8:00 - 9:30 a.m. Breakfast
10:00 a.m. Festival Service with
Holy Communion
.·.». . rt.···
join us this Easter
9:30 am Worship Service
Shawnee Alliance Ac vity Center
10:15 am Tradi onal Service
Shawnee Alliance Church
11 am Worship Services
Shawnee Alliance Ac vity Center
Shawnee Alliance Ac vity Center
4450 Shawnee Road
Shawnee Alliance Church
4455 Shawnee Road
www.shawneealliance.com 419.991.6546
Shawnee Alliance
CHURCH
Petersburg Parishes
Holy Thursday
8:30 a.m. Morning Prayer at Immaculate Conception
Mass of the Lord’s Supper
7:00 p.m. at St. Joseph
7:30 p.m. at Immaculate Conception
Good Friday
8:30 a.m. Morning Prayer at Immaculate Conception
Celebration of the Lord’s Passion
12:30 p.m. at Immaculate Conception
1:30 p.m. at St. Joseph
7:30 p.m. at St. Lawrence
Holy Saturday
8:30 a.m. Morning Prayer at Immaculate Conception
Solemn Easter Vigil
8:30 p.m. at Immaculate Conception
Easter Sunday
Mass of the Resurrection
8:00 & 10:00 a.m. at St. Joseph
Wapakoneta
9:00 a.m. at St. Lawrence - Rhine
10:30 a.m. at Immaculate Conception
Botkins
First United
Methodist Church
Maundy Thursday
7:00 p.m. The Lower Room
A dramatic portrayal of the women disciples
during Jesus' trial & crucifixion
Good Friday
7:30 p.m. Service of Darkness (Tenebrae)
Easter Sunday
8:15 a.m. Contemporary Easter Celebration
9:15 a.m. Holy Communion/Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Traditional Easter Celebration
Weekly Schedule
Sundays
8:15 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Worship
9:15 a.m. Holy Communion / Sunday School
Wednesdays
6:30 p.m. A variety of activities for all ages
Thursdays
Loaves & Fishes Free Community Meal
Senior Pastor, Rev. R.J. Davis • Deacon, Rev. Wayne Lee
Corner of Glynwood & Hamilton
419-738-8168
www.bright.net/~fumc/
Making Disciples of Jesus Christ
for the Transformation of the World
“where there’s Peace in the midst of the storms of life.”
We’re 2 miles south of Route 33,
just east of Cemetery Rd.
15321 Pusheta Road
Wapakoneta, OH 45895-8413
(419) 738-6746
St. John’s
Lutheran Church
EASTER SERVICES:
Maundy Thursday 7:00 p.m.
Good Friday 7:00 p.m.
Easter Sunday 10:00 a.m.
VISITORS WELCOME
Pastor Ray Long
To find Faith, Hope and your Savior Jesus
Christ in this uncertain world of today
ST. MARKS LUTHERAN CHURCH
302 E. Pearl Street, Wapakoneta, Ohio
419-738-3122 ~ stmarks@bright.net
Website: www.stmarkswapak.org
Pastor Mark Bauer
March 28 Maundy Thursday
7:00 p.m. Maundy Thursday Service
@ St. Paul United Church of Christ
March 29 Good Friday
12 Noon Community Good Friday Service
@ St. Mark’s
7:00 p.m. Good Friday Service @ St. Mark’s
March 30 Easter Celebration
5:00 p.m. Saturday Worship
March 31 Easter Sunday
8:00 a.m. Easter Sunrise
Communion Service
9:00 a.m. Easter Breakfast
10:15 a.m. Easter Service &
Communion
Everyone is Welcome!
HOLY
WEEK
Services
Pope to get simple coat of arms, ring
VATICAN CITY (AP)
— Pope Francis is mixing
his Argentine past with
his Roman present to cre-
ate his new papal coat of
arms, while harking back
to a pope associated with
the Second Vatican Coun-
cil for the simple ring
that he will receive dur-
ing Tuesday’s installation
Mass.
Te Vatican recently re-
leased details of the sym-
bols of Francis’ pontif-
cate, which in its inaugural
days has been marked by
his preference for simplic-
ity and aversion to Holy
See splendor.
Te new pope chose
to keep the same coat of
arms he had as archbish-
op of Buenos Aires, and
picked the simplest ring
out of several models of-
fered him. It is fashioned
in gold-plated silver and
was once a gif to Pope
Paul VI, who presided
over the second half of
Vatican II, the meet-
ings that modernized the
church.
Te coat of arms has a
necessary addition — the
papal symbols surround-
ing it: a gilded miter, and
crossed gold and silver
keys.
Te shield itself, in very
simple almost modern
heraldry, depicts a star,
a grape-like plant, and a
monogram of Christ at
the center of a fery sun.
Te symbols represent
the three members of the
Holy Family, Jesus, Mary
and Joseph. In religious
writing, Mary is ofen re-
ferred to as a “star,” while
St. Joseph is ofen de-
picted holding a nard, a
Middle Eastern plant. Te
monogram is the symbol
of Francis’ Jesuit order.
His moto suggests
even more about the root
of Francis’ message:
“Miserando atque eli-
gendo,” Latin for “Having
had mercy, he called him,”
comes from an episode in
the Gospel where Christ
picks a seemingly unwor-
thy person to follow him.
Francis has stressed
the importance of mercy,
saying that ofen people
are unforgiving with one
another, but that God is
all-merciful. “And very pa-
tient,” he ad-libbed from
the window of his studio
during his frst Angelus
prayer Sunday.
In a writen explana-
tion of the coat of arms,
moto and ring, the Vati-
can said that the inspira-
tion for the moto stems
from the calling Jorge Ber-
goglio heard at the age of
17, when “he experienced
the presence of the love of
God in a very special way,”
and decided to join the Je-
suit order.
Francis’s of cial ring
will look like gold, but in
fact is only gold plated.
Known as the fsher-
man’s ring from the apos-
tle Peter, who was a fsh-
erman and the frst pope,
Francis’s version depicts
St. Peter holding the keys
of the Holy See. Each
pope picks his own ring,
which will be destroyed at
the end of his papacy.
According to Vatican
spokesman the Rev. Fed-
erico Lombardi, the ring
was one of several ofered
to Francis. Fashioned in
the 1960s by Italian gold-
smith Enrico Manfrini,
it was ofered to Paul VI
through his private sec-
retary. Lombardi said it
is not known if the pope
ever used it.
Abaca Press/MCT
Pope Francis greets President Cristina Kirchner of
Argentina in the Vatican on March in his first meeting
with a head of state as world leaders arrived in Rome
ahead of his inauguration mass.
10A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
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Career From Page 1A
ty government of cials and
representatives from civic
clubs were also available.
“Tis was about as big
of a variety as we have
had,” Dyer said. “Tere
students were able to di-
rectly speak to diferent
people about career paths
they might have. Tey can
get direction of which way
to go with their next step
if they want to go a certain
direction. Hopefully they
get the information about
things that interest them.”
Te fair, under Dyer’s
oversight, was completely
arranged and put together
by students from her ani-
mal science class as a class
project.
“All of the people repre-
senting the diferent indus-
tries were people that the
students knew or contact-
ed,” Dyer said. “Tey put
this together themselves. I
think they did a great job.”
Te event was held for
students from the sixth
grade through seniors in
high school and was sepa-
rated into sections so stu-
dents would have plenty
of time to ask any ques-
tions they had.
Visits From Page 1A
Te program, which
takes place every spring,
requires student teams
to manage a hypothetical
$100,000 online portfolio
and investing in real stock.
Dellinger has two eco-
nomics classes with 40
students — 10 teams —
participating in this chal-
lenge.
“Tis is for students to
learn how the stock mar-
ket operates,” Dellinger
said explaining the goal of
the challenge. “I tie this in
with my investment unit.”
During the challenge,
the students check their
stocks, and they are able
to buy and sell stocks.
“Te game allows
them to understand how
it works,” Dellinger said,
“and it gives a fun, com-
petitive edge.”
Wapakoneta High
School senior Annie Har-
rod, who is working in a
group with Carlie Sam-
mons and Jocelyn Camp-
bell, said their team is do-
ing well.
“We are ranked 310 out
of 4,000 teams in Ohio,”
Harrod said. “We have
fve stocks we put all of
our money into.”
Tose include Good-
year Tires, Southwest and
Delta airlines and two
medical companies.
“We learn to manage
money and to keep an eye
on the stock market,” Har-
rod said. “You never know
when it is going to change.”
Before the challenge,
Harrod said she had a brief
understanding of the stock
market, but now she has
learned so much from this
program that one day she
wants to invest in stocks.
“You can really beneft
from it,” Harrod said.
Classmate Saira Brown
said her group has had
some struggles along the
way during this challenge.
“We invested in some
bad stock,” Brown said.
“So we are trying to learn
from our mistakes.”
Tis challenge showed
Brown how to manage
money.
“I think it’s really neat,”
Brown said of the chal-
lenge.
Te classroom learning
focuses on the dynamics
of the marketplace and
the importance of long-
term saving and investing.
While Jordan spoked
to the students briefy on
the challenge, he gave the
students some advice to
take with them.
“Tere are a couple
things I try to tell young
adults and that is to work
hard and don’t let people
tell you that you won’t be
able to do something,”
Jordan said.
When Jordan ran for a
state representative seat in
1994, he was told he had
no chance of winning.
“I decided to run any-
way,” said Jordan, who
also served as a state sena-
tor. “We went door to
door and ended up raising
$17,000, and we ended up
beating the other oppo-
nent.”
Jordan proved that his
hard work paid of.
“Don’t let anyone tell
you you can’t,” Jordan
said. “If you are willing to
work hard, good things
can happen.”
During the question-
and-answer session with
the students, he was asked
about the country’s debt,
balancing budgets, the
2nd amendment and
Obama-care.
At the end of the pro-
gram he gave another
piece of advice to the stu-
dents, he said if a person
can communicate, they
will do well — as students
should pay atention in all
their subjects.
“People who read, write
and speak well will do bet-
ter in life,” Jordan said.
Staff photo/Carla Meyer
Seniors in Bill Dellinger’s economics class stand with Republican U.S. Rep. Jim
Jordan during his visit to Wapakoneta High School on Tuesday.
Woman From Page 5A
p.m.
Nothing was missing
except the dog, which was
later caught.
Te incident remains
under investigation.
Tere are no suspects.
• While on patrol, an
of cer observed Jordan
Bricker atempting to
enter a residence at 405
North St. at 1:50 a.m.
Monday.
According to the re-
port:
Bricker was not to be at
the residence due to an-
other pending investiga-
tion, Kohler said.
Te of cer made con-
tact with him before he
entered the door and he
lef the area on foot at the
of cer’s direction.
• Jerry Earl, 15173 Val-
ley Road, Wapakoneta,
was cited for operating a
motor vehicle while un-
der the infuence of alco-
hol (OVI) and incarcerat-
ed in the Auglaize County
Jail at 11:45 a.m. Friday.
According to the re-
port:
A Wapakoneta man
called about a possible
intoxicated driver who
was driving in an erratic
manner. Te motorist’s
name and number were
obtained and the vehicle
and motorist located in
the Walmart parking lot.
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Karen Kantner
Asst. Managing Editor
419-739-3517
reporter2@wapakwdn.com
Page 2B:
No penalties will be
issued after incidents in
California
Section
B
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
East
98
West
63
CBJ
0
Vancouver
1 (SO)_
Dallas
109
Clippers
102 (OT)
SPORTS
VS VS VS
Sports Editor
THOMAS BRADLEY
sports@wapakwdn.com
419-739-3508

QUOTE
of the day
“Te biggest thing is
to build the tradition
and to get kids
interested in football”
Bo Frye
Wapak football camp dir.
Circulation note to readers
Because of inclement weather delaying picture day and the potential start
of the baseball season, the Wapakoneta Daily New’s Spring Sports Preview
will be published on April 5 this season.
If you have any questions concerning this change, please contact the
Sports Editor, Thomas Bradley, at sports@wapakwdn.com or 419-739-3508.
Thank you, and Go Skins!
SCHEDULE QUICK LOOK
NBA
Today
Boston at Cleveland
FSOH- 7 p.m.
Today
Miami at Chicago
ESPN 8 p.m.
Today
Brooklyn at Portland
ESPN 10:30 p.m.
Wapak highlighted in All-Star game
By THOMAS BRADLEY
Sports Editor
ELIDA — Tree
Wapakoneta seniors and
the Wapakoneta boys var-
sity basketball coach high-
lighted the West squad at
Tuesday’s District 8 Boys
All-Star game in Elida.
Defense wasn’t an em-
phasis for either squad, as
it was an All-Star exhibi-
tion, and the fnal score
showed it.
Te East, coached by
Bath’s Doug Davis, rolled
over the West, 98-63.
Wapakoneta made
its presence on the West
squad, as Travis Bertram
and Jake Buzzard were the
two leading scorers for
their squad with 15 points
and 11 points, respectively.
Alex Greve was also on
the West squad which was
coached by Wapakoneta
variety coach Mat Brad-
ley.
Tre’on Johnson, of
the East squad and Lima
Central Catholic, led all
scorers with 24 points.
He knocked down six
3-pointers. Bath’s Cole
Chambers added 20
points for the East squad
as they won in decisive
manner.
Both coaches em-
phasized having fun and
working hard, but defense
wasn’t a concern for either
squad. Te East squad had
the game all but wrapped
up entering halfime, as
they were more than half-
way to the century mark,
53-33.
Jim
Litke
AP columnist
USA got
away
with one
Te Americans got
away with one. Tere’s no
denying that.
Mexico, playing at
home, was the beter
team. Tey possessed the
ball more, created more
scoring chances (17 shots
to 1) and corner kicks
(15-2) and rarely stopped
surging, even afer one
questionable call went
against them early, book-
ended by an undeniably
bad call late.
Facing a young and in-
experienced U.S. defense,
they efectively turned the
last fve minutes of Tues-
day’s World Cup qualifer
at Azteca Stadium into
target practice. For once,
it wasn’t enough.
“You’re never going to
come to a place like Az-
teca and go out and have
it nice and easy,” U.S. goal-
keeper Brad Guzan said
afer the 0-0 draw. “So we
knew at some point, it was
going to come, the pres-
sure was going to come,
and we were able to deal
with it.”
As a result, the man
who wound up on the
hot seat at the end was
not the one some people
expected going in. Te
injustice of it all no doubt
was still sinking in when
Jose Manuel De la Torre,
the coach of soccer-mad
Mexico, was asked afer-
ward whether he expected
to keep his job.
“I’m not responsible
for that decision,” De la
Torre replied coolly. “We
have worked hard. Te
federation has the last
word, they and the own-
ers take that decision.”
It’s one measure how
far the game has come in
the United States that his
counterpart, Jurgen Klins-
mann, likely would have
been grilled — though
not nearly as quickly nor
audaciously — if his team
had lost.
Most American sports
fans are distracted by the
NCAA tournament, or by
the incredible run LeB-
ron James is on, perhaps
even waiting for spring
training. And to be fair,
despite all the history
hanging over this game
— in a place where the
Americans had managed
exactly one tie in 14 pre-
vious tries — it’s still early
enough in qualifying for
the 2014 World Cup for
both teams to get in under
the wire comfortably.
De la Torre made that
Big Ten standing strong in Tourney
EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP)
— Te Big Ten has a nation-high
four teams still in the NCAA
tournament, bolstering its sea-
son-long boast that its conference
is the best in college basketball.
Te Big Ten has combined
to win 10 games so far, its best
showing through the round of 32
— ever.
And, it could get even beter.
An All-Big Ten Final Four is
possible because top-seeded In-
diana, second-seeded Ohio State,
third-seeded Michigan State and
fourth-seeded Michigan will
compete this week in diferent
regions.
“Te fact that there are four
teams advancing shows that this
conference prepares you for any
type of team or game,” Hoosiers
coach Tom Crean wrote in a text
message Monday morning while
preparing to play fourth-seeded
Syracuse in the East Regional
semifnals. “You develop posses-
sion by possession appreciation.”
Indiana played grind-it-out,
low-scoring games during the Big
Ten — going 0-3 when held to
fewer than 60 points — and had
to rally late in some other games
to win. Te experiences paid of
when the Hoosiers, who won the
Big Ten regular season title, need-
ed to close with a 10-0 run to beat
ninth-seeded Temple 58-52 and
get to the regional semifnals for
the second straight year.
Being in closely contested
games also seemed to help the
Big Ten tournament champion
Buckeyes, who advanced to a
school-record fourth consecutive
round of 16 by making enough
stops and shots to outlast 10th-
seeded Iowa State 78-75.
“Playing 21 straight Big Ten
games with the caliber of players,
teams and coaches that we have
in the conference does prepare
you for anything,” Ohio State
coach Tad Mata said in a tele-
phone interview with Te Asso-
ciated Press. “You face so many
diferent styles from how teams
defend ball screens to how they
run their ofenses.
“I’m happy as heck for the
conference, but we’re just trying
to fgure out how to get past Ari-
zona.”
Ohio State will face the sixth-
seeded Wildcats in the West Re-
gional semifnals.
Michigan State will be
matched up with second-seeded
MCT photo
Ohio State forward Deshaun Thomas (1) reacts after scoring a basket
against Iowa State during first-half action in the third round of the
NCAA Tournament .
Wapak coaches prepare for offseason camps
Staff photo/Thomas Bradley
There are four camp options for youth football players
through the Wapakoneta football program.
By THOMAS BRADLEY
Sports Editor
Wapakoneta football
coaches are preparing
for Frye’s Football Fun-
damentals Camp this
summer, with hopes of
growing the Wapakoneta
football program from the
ground up.
Bo Frye, the son of var-
sity football coach Doug
Frye and an assistant on
the Wapakoneta squad,
will be the camp direc-
tor this year, and is ex-
cited about the camp this
year, to build tradition at
Wapakoneta.
“Te biggest thing is to
build the tradition and to
get kids interested in foot-
ball,” Bo Frye said of the
fundamentals camp.
Te camp has four
age groups for athletes,
the Elementary camp for
incoming grades K–3,
Midget camp for incom-
ing grades 4–6, Jr. High
camp for incoming grades
7 and 8 and Frosh camp,
for incoming freshmen.
Te cost is $30 per ath-
lete, and it includes three
days of instruction, a T-
shirt and a snack each day.
Te Elementary camp
will be held June 24–26
from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Te Midget camp will
be held June 24–26 from
2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Te Jr. High camp will
be held July 15–17 from 1
p.m. – 3 p.m.
Te Frosh camp will
be held July 15–17 from 9
a.m. – 11 a.m.
Bo Frye said this camp
helps people of all ages get
excited for the upcoming
football season. He also
said it is a great fundraiser
for the program, and that
for the cost of the camp, is
a bargain for participants.
Bo Frye will be assisted
by a lot of the assistant
coaches, including his
brother Koby Frye, who
will be a frst-year coach at
Wapakoneta next season.
“It’s a family thing,
but its also a work thing,
when I’m there I’m treat-
See CAMPS, Page 2B See USA, Page 2B
See BIG TEN, Page 2B
Duke in the Midwest, a
highly anticipated game
featuring coaches who
have combined to appear
in 25 regional semifnals
since 1998.
Michigan, which has
won two NCAA tourna-
ment games for the frst
time since 1994, will have
to get past top-seeded
Kansas in the South.
Te Big Ten had seven
teams start the NCAA
tournament last week and
only ffh-seeded Wiscon-
sin failed to advance, los-
ing by 11 points to 12th-
seeded Mississippi.
Minnesota routed
UCLA by 20 — though
that didn’t help Tubby
Smith keep his job be-
cause he was fred Mon-
day, a day afer losing by
14 to Florida.
Illinois beat Colorado
before losing a competi-
tive game with second-
seeded Miami.
Te Golden Gophers
and Fighting Illini helped
to help the conference win
10 games, a total that trails
the Big East’s record of 11
wins through the round
of 32 in 2009 and 2012,
according to STATS. Te
Big Ten had won nine
games four times up to
this point of the NCAA
tournament, including
last season, when it also
sent four teams to the re-
gional semifnals.
Spartans coach Tom
Izzo started saying the
conference was the best
in the country before the
season opened and he felt
even stronger about his
opinion throughout the
nonconference schedule
when his team had one of
the league’s marquee wins
by beating Kansas.
Even though the Big
Ten has one more team
than the Big East still in
the NCAA tournament
— and twice as many as
the ACC and Pac-12 —
Izzo insisted he doesn’t
feel as if his point has been
proven.
“To some, it won’t be
validated unless the Big
Ten wins a champion-
ship,” Izzo said. “Percep-
tion becomes a litle bit
of reality and the more
games you win, the farther
you go. I think we earned
our keep, again, over the
18 grueling games and
that Big Ten Tournament.
“Now this is frosting on
the cake. “
Michigan State and
Michigan won their frst
two games relatively eas-
ily, puting the rivals in the
same round of 16 for the
frst time.
Izzo, who has said it is
“illegal” to like the Wol-
verines, acknowledged he
is pulling for the maize
and blue and the rest of
the Big Ten during the
NCAA tournament
Michigan coach John
Beilein said he surprised
himself by cheering for
another rival, the Buck-
eyes, in their tight game
with the Cyclones.
“During the season,
I do not root for other
schools in the Big Ten,”
Beilein told Te AP. “But
I found myself rooting
for the Big Ten this past
weekend, hoping Aaron
Craf would make a free
throw or a 3-pointer, be-
cause there’s an apprecia-
tion for the competition
we have within our con-
ference.”
Te Big Ten hasn’t
had a national champion
in men’s basketball since
the Spartans won it all in
2000, a title that ended
an 11-year drought afer
Michigan cut down the
nets in 1989. Before that,
the Bobby Knight-led
Hoosiers won national
titles in 1987, 1981 and
1976 and Magic Johnson
helped Michigan State
beat Indiana State — with
Larry Bird — in 1979 in a
transcendent game.
Mata said the Big Ten
is due for a title, telling re-
porters in Dayton, Ohio,
it is “highly likely,” a team
from the conference will
win the national champi-
onship.
“Tere’s a very, very
good chance of it,” he said.
“Te one thing about the
Big Ten this year is you’ve
got great players. Obvi-
ously, you’ve got great
coaches.
“It will be interesting to
see how it plays out.”
SPORTS
2B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
No penalties issued
after California race
CHARLOTE, N.C.
(AP) — NASCAR
Chairman Brian France
said Tuesday the contact
between Joey Logano
and Denny Hamlin as
they batled for the win
at California over the
weekend was just the
kind of throwback rac-
ing he expects out of his
drivers and the new Gen-
6 car.
“I have said repeat-
edly, every minute, that
contact, especially late
in the race when you are
going for a win, that’s not
only going to happen —
that’s expected,” France
said in a telephone in-
terview with Te Associ-
ated Press. “Both of them
did exactly what I think
you would do when you
really, really want to win.
Geting some contact,
trying to race extra hard
to win the race, that’s
what we’re about.”
Hamlin sufered a
compressed fracture
of the L1 vertebra in
his lower back, and Joe
Gibbs Racing said Tues-
day night he’ll be out a
minimum of six weeks.
France, who spoke to
AP hours before JGR an-
nounced Hamlin would
not require surgery but
needed time to heal, did
not think anything was
done intentionally by
Logano to harm Hamlin.
“Injuries can happen
throughout any race on
any lap, and fortunately
they are seldom,” France
said. “Tat’s just part of
racing.”
NASCAR announced
Tuesday no penalties
were warranted afer
California — not against
Tony Stewart for scuf-
fing with Logano afer
the race, and series of-
fcials saw nothing to in-
dicate Logano or Hamlin
were trying to intention-
ally wreck each other as
they raced for the win.
In addition, NASCAR
of cials have given no
thought to policing
blocking, which is what
Logano did to Stewart on
the fnal restart to trigger
the post-race confronta-
tion.
“Tere are no conver-
sations internally inside
of NASCAR to look at
blocking as a violation or
a penalty as some other
forms of motorsports
do,” Sprint Cup Series
director John Darby said.
“As good as the racing
has been, as exciting as
it’s been, I don’t know
that we need to jump in
the middle and screw it
up.”
Stewart parked his
car near Logano’s and
angrily approached him
afer Sunday’s race at
Auto Club Speedway in
Fontana. Tere was some
shoving, but crew mem-
bers intervened before
any punches landed. Lo-
gano threw a water botle
at Stewart.
Darby said the inci-
dent didn’t escalate to a
level where NASCAR
had to take action.
“A few years ago we
backed away from micro-
managing drivers’ emo-
tions, you would hope
in today’s world that if
somebody didn’t win a
race, they would be up-
set about it,” Darby said.
“I don’t know that we’ve
actually got a rule book
that describes every push
in the chest or kick in the
shin. If two guys get into
a hell of a fght, we’re go-
ing to have to react.”
MCT file photo
NASCAR driver Tony Stewart enjoys a laugh follow-
ing practice laps on Wednesday, Febraury 20, 2013,
at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona.
Big Ten From Page 1B
Camp
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Foreign - Domestic - Trucks
ed like every other coach
is treated, he puts extra
pressure on me to beter
my career,” Bo Frye said.
Because of OHSAA
policies, Doug Frye won’t
be able to be involved
with the camp this sea-
son. He has reduced his
teaching role, and as a
result will have to sit out
for two months as head
coach, starting May 1.
Tat is why his two son’s
will be heading up the
camp this year.
Also assisting at the
camp will be Brent Co-
peland, Troy Huelskamp,
Joe Schnarre, Adam
Friemering, Jack Miller,
Tom Hunter, Bill Sam-
mons, Shane Paterson,
Jason Johnson, Derek
Dunlap, Cody Martin, Joe
Morgan, Todd Erb and
Jeremy Dickey.
Sign up sheets are
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neta school locations.
argument, pointing out
that Panama, the sur-
prise leader of the CON-
CACAF group, has fve
points and his team has
three, with the potential
for 21 more points still
out there.
“It’s close and of course
we are not where we
wanted to be,” he said.
“Our obligation is to win
at home, and we have lef
points behind, two points
out of six is low, we have
that clear.”
Te Americans are
snugly in second with
four, but the bigger sur-
prise might be that fnally,
there are some expecta-
tions for the U.S. side,
Tat was reinforced by the
stir a story in the Sporting
News kicked up at the
start of last week. Quoting
unidentifed players and
people close to the team,
it portrayed Klinsmann,
a great German player
and one-term World Cup
coach, as out of touch
with the sentiment in his
locker room and a poor
tactician to boot.
Tat the U.S. team
beat Costa Rica 1-0 in a
blizzard in Colorado a
few days later did litle to
quiet the restive mood.
Some players were up-
set with how he benched
Carlos Bocanegra, a stal-
wart of the national team
and long its captain. Oth-
ers were disgruntled over
what they viewed as favor-
able treatment aforded
a handful of German im-
ports — all four the sons
of U.S. servicemen — and
how Klinsmann ofen
kept everyone uncertain
about their spot by post-
ing his starting lineups at
the last minute.
Te best thing that
emerged from the draw,
other than the point —
the only other point a U.S.
side has earned in Mexico
came in a draw in 1997
— was the emergence of
Omar Gonzalez as a rock
in Bocanegra’s old job, at
the center of the defense,
a development that could
pay big dividends down
the road.
Klinsmann wisely
avoided any mention af-
terward of the close calls
that could have paid im-
mediate dividends for
Mexico. Te frst one
came when U.S. midfeld-
er Michael Bradley pulled
down Javier Hernandez,
running without the ball
in the box. Te second,
much more egregious,
came when Maurice Edu
tackled Javier Aquino,
who had the ball and was
just steps from Guzan,
from behind.
Maybe Klinsmann
didn’t see the need.
Among the other things
the rest of the world al-
ready knows about the
beautiful game that he
believes they will under-
stand in good time is this:
It’s not always fair, either.
USA From Page 1B
Blue Jackets grab point in Vancouver
VANCOUVER —
When the Vancouver
Canucks and Columbus
Blue  Jackets have played
each other this season, the
goals have been few and far
between.
Cory Schneider made
17 saves and Max Lapierre
scored the shootout-win-
ning goal and the Canucks
beat the Blue  Jackets 1-0
on Tuesday for their ffh
straight victory.
Te past two meetings
between the clubs — both
played in Columbus —
have ended in a 2-1 result.
One was a shootout
victory for Vancouver on
March 12, and the other
an overtime win on March
8 for theBlue Jackets.
Schneider saw just two
shots in the opening pe-
riod on Tuesday and eight
total shots through 40
minutes.
“It’s beter than 40
shots, but it is challenging
to just make sure you are
sharp and ready and you
haven’t really felt a puck
and sometimes it’s nice to
get a feel for it and just get
your hands going and seal
it up and stuf like that,”
Schneider said.
“I haven’t really experi-
enced a game like that at
this level so it was a chal-
lenge.”
Schneider made a num-
ber of big stops in the
third, including a few of
Nick Foligno, who was
easily the most dangerous
Blue Jacket with six shots.
However, the biggest
save came from defense-
man Dan Hamhuis with
just over a minute to play
when he slid across to kick
out Foligno’s shot afer tak-
ing a back-door pass.
“Just trying to help him
out there,” Hamhuis said.
“A desperation play, got
lucky.”
Vancouver moved
past idle Minnesota into
third place in the Western
Conference, and into the
Northwest Division lead.
Columbus moved
up one spot to 10th in
the West, but that single
point can be atributed to
Blue  Jacketsgoalie Sergei
Bobrovsky.
“He was by far our best
player out there, he gave
us a chance to maybe win
in overtime,” Vinny Pro-
spal said. “We don’t score
enough goals as it is and
today I don’t think we re-
ally played that hard as a
team.”
While Bobrovsky en-
tered the game with the
league’s third-best goals-
against average of 2.17,
Columbus also has the
NHL’s worst goals for av-
erage, with just 78 through
33 games.
MARCH MADNESS
3B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Col orado
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Paci f i c
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Mont ana
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Nort hwest ern St .
Vi rgi ni a CW
Georget own
Wi sconsi n
Not re Dame
I ona
St . Loui s
Pi t t sburgh
Templ e
UCLA
Col orado St .
Kansas St .
UNLV
Mi chi gan St .
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I ndi ana
Nort h Carol i na
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Syracuse
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Oregon
But l er
Loui svi l l e
NC St at e
Harvard
Duke
Vi l l anova
Creighton
Bucknel l
MARCH MADNESS
Florida Gulf Coast
Mi nnesot a
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I l l i noi s
Marquet t e
Gonzaga
Ol e Mi ss
Bel mont
Memphi s
Akron
Mi ssouri
Pl ay- i n 3 Pl ay- i n 2 Pl ay- i n 1 Pl ay- i n 4
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24 W Auglaize Street
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728 Keller Dr. • Wapakoneta
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419-738-7269
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702 N. Cable Road
Lima, OH
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127 W. Auglaize St. •Wapakoneta
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Since 1848
The Original Recyclers
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Donnie Nichols
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2
APRIL 6 AND 8
ATLANTA
National
Championship
APRIL 8
Watch On
DAYTON
MARCH 19-20
First Round*
Second Round
MARCH 21-22
Second Round
MARCH 21-22
Third Round
MARCH 23-24
Third Round
MARCH 23-24
Regional
Semifinals
MARCH 28-29
Regional
Finals
MARCH 30-31
National
Semifinals
APRIL 6
Regional
Semifinals
MARCH 28-29
Regional
Finals
MARCH 30-31
National
Semifinals
APRIL 6
Watch the tournament on these networks
or online at NCAA.COM/MARCHMADNESS
***ALL TIMES EASTERN***
*On March 17, the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Committee will select eight teams to play the first-round games on March 19 and 20 in Dayton.
The four winning teams will advance to a second-round site to be determined by the committee during selection weekend.
Second- and third-round and regional sites will be placed in the bracket by the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Committee March 17.
N.C. A&T (19-16)
Liberty (15-20)
Middle Tenn. (28-5)
St. Mary’s (CA) (27-6)
Louisville (29-5)
Missouri (23-10)
Colorado St. (25-8)
Oklahoma St. (24-8)
Oregon (26-8)
New Mexico St. (24-10)
Saint Louis (27-6)
Memphis (30-4)
Valparaiso (26-7)
Michigan St. (25-8)
Cincinnati (22-11)
Creighton (27-7)
Albany (N.Y.) (24-10)
Duke (27-5)
Gonzaga (31-2)
Southern U (23-9)
Wichita St. (26-8)
Pittsburgh (24-8)
Ole Miss (26-8)
Wisconsin (23-11)
Kansas St. (27-7)
Belmont (26-6)
Arizona (25-7)
New Mexico (29-5)
Harvard (19-9)
Iowa St. (22-11)
Notre Dame (25-9)
Iona (20-13)
Ohio St. (26-7)
Kansas (29-5)
Villanova (20-13)
North Carolina (24-10)
Western Ky. (20-15)
VCU (26-8)
Akron (26-6)
S. Dakota St. (25-9)
Michigan (26-7)
UCLA (25-9)
Northwestern St. (23-8)
Florida (26-7)
Oklahoma (20-11)
San Diego St. (22-10)
Fla. Gulf Coast (24-10)
Georgetown (25-6)
Indiana (27-6)
Temple (23-9)
NC State (24-10)
UNLV (25-9)
California (20-11)
Syracuse (26-9)
Montana (25-6)
Bucknell (28-5)
Butler (26-8)
Davidson (26-7)
Marquette (23-8)
Colorado (21-11)
Illinois (22-12)
Pacific (22-12)
Miami (Fla.) (27-6)
LIU Brooklyn (20-13)
JMU (20-14)
Boise St. (21-10)
La Salle (21-9) 16
16
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Minnesota (20-12)
INDIANAPOLIS
March 31
LOS ANGELES
March 30
WASHINGTON, D.C.
March 30
NORTH TEXAS
March 31
Washington, D.C.
Mar 28, 9:45PM - CBS
Washington, D.C.
Mar 28, 7:15PM - CBS
Indianapolis
Mar 29, 7:15PM - CBS
Indianapolis
Mar 29, 9:45PM - CBS
North Texas
Mar 29, 7:37PM - TBS
North Texas
Mar 29, 9:57PM - TBS
Los Angeles
Mar 28, 10:17PM - TBS
Los Angeles
Mar 28, 7:47PM - TBS
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4 Michigan
1 Kansas
15 FGCU
1 Louisville
12 Oregon
3 Michigan St.
6 Arizona
13 La Salle
2 Duke
9 Wichita St.
2 Ohio St.
3 Florida
4 Syracuse
1 Indiana
3 Marquette
2 Miami (Fla.)
Dayton
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Mar 24
Austin
Mar 24
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Mar 24
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Mar 24
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Mar 23
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Mar 23
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Mar 23
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Mar 23
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Mar 23
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Mar 23
63
83
79
47
83
62
72
76
57
49
78
49
67
63
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61
58
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70
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68
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46
57
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63
79
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72
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68
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42
71
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11 Minnesota
3 Florida
1 Indiana
9 Temple
7 Illinois
2 Miami (Fla.)
7 Creighton
2 Duke
10 Iowa St.
2 Ohio St.
1 Kansas
8 UNC
7 San Diego St.
15 FGCU
12 Ole Miss
13 La Salle
1 Louisville
12 Oregon
4 Saint Louis
8 Colorado St.
6 Memphis
3 Michigan St.
12 California
4 Syracuse
6 Butler
3 Marquette
1 Gonzaga
9 Wichita St.
5 VCU
4 Michigan
6 Arizona
14 Harvard
Mar 22
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N.C. A&T
St. Mary’s (CA)
La Salle
JMU
Mar 20 Mar 20 Mar 19 Mar 19
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COUNTY LIFE
4B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
104 E. Mason Rd. • Sidney
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M-W 9-6 • Th 9-1 • Fri 9-8 • Sat. 9-3
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Game Night: The Story-
matic from 6 to 7 p.m. on
Thursday, March 28. All
teen storytellers are wanted.
• Storytime will be held
at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday,
March 28 at White Memo-
rial Library. All ages are
welcome.
• Storytime will be held
at Cridersville Public Library
at 11:30 a.m. on Mon-
day, April 1. All ages are
welcome.
• Storytime will be held
at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday,
April 2 at the Auglaize
County Public District Li-
brary. All ages are welcome.
• The Adult Knitting
and Crocheting Circle will
meet from 5:30 to 7 p.m.
on Tuesday, April 2 at the
Auglaize County Public
District Library.
• The Adult Crochet Club
will meet at White Memorial
Library from 1:30 to 2:30
p.m. and 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, April 2.
• The Middle West Dis-
trict of Ohio Music Teachers
Association will be held
from 9:30 a.m. to noon on
Tuesday, April 2 at Bluffton
University in Mosiman Hall.
For more information, call
419-394-2174.
• The Adult Quilting
class will meet from 5:30
to 7 p.m. on Wednesday,
April 3 at the Auglaize
County Public District
Library.
• A Crocheting and Knit-
ting Class will be held for
ages 10-adult at Cridersville
Public Library from 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. on Wednesday,
April 3. This class is for the
experienced or for those
who want to learn. Bring
a crochet hook or knitting
needles and yarn.
• Come to the Auglaize
County Public District
Library for the Dr. Seuss
Party to celebrate Dr. Seuss
Books at 4:30 p.m. on
Thursday, April 4. This is
for kids in grades pre-K to
third grade.
• Storytime will be held
at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday,
April 4 at White Memo-
rial Library. All ages are
welcome.
• Auglaize County
Patriots meeting will host
their monthly meeting at
6:30 p.m. on Thursday,
April 4 at RJ’s Coffey Cup,
903 Defiance St., Wapako-
neta. The guest speaker for
the evening will be Linda
Barry, who will explain the
essentials behind prepping
for short-term or long-term
emergency situations.
• The Uniopolis His-
torical Society will host a
Spaghetti Dinner from 4 to
7 p.m. on Saturday, April 6
at the Uniopolis Fire Depart-
ment. The price for adults
is $5, the price for children
6-12 is $2.50 and children
under 6 are free.
• A Mom To Mom Sale
will be held from 9 am. to 1
p.m. on Saturday, April 6
at St. Joe school, on State
Route 501 in Wapakoneta.
Admission is $1.
• Storytime will be held
at Cridersville Public Library
at 11:30 a.m. on Mon-
day, April 8. All ages are
welcome.
Community
Calendar
Wildflowers are a welcome sign of spring
W-G honor roll
Rose-Hulman Dean’s List
M
any of us look
for morel mush-
rooms, but
there is much more to
see at the same time, said
Rhonda Ferree, a Uni-
versity of
I l l i n o i s
E x t e n -
sion hor-
ti cul ture
educator.
Wo o d -
land wild-
f l o we r s
are beau-
tiful and a welcome sign
of spring.
A common woodland
wildfower is the spring
beauty (Claytonia virgi-
nica). Tis is a low plant
with loose clusters of pink
or whitish fowers striped
with dark pink. Te fow-
ers are one-half to three-
fourths of an inch wide
with fve petals. Leaves
are long, linear, and grass-
like. Tese fowers bloom
from March to May in
moist woods and clear-
ings. Tis spring peren-
nial is spectacular in large
patches and grows from a
potato-like underground
tuber.
A more noticeable
native wildfower is Vir-
ginia bluebell (Merten-
sia virginica). Tis 8 to
24 inch erect plant has
smooth gray-green leaves
and nodding clusters of
light blue trumpet-shaped
fowers. Te individual
fowers start as pink buds
and open to about 1 inch
long. Virginia bluebells
fower from March to
June in moist woods, and
it is also a popular shade
garden plant. Grown in
masses, this fower is hard
to miss.
Tere are several fow-
ers from the poppy fam-
ily that have spectacular
spring showings: Dutch-
man’s breeches (Dicen-
tra cucullaria), Coryda-
lis (Corydalis sp.) and
bloodroot (Sanguinaria
canadensis). Dutchman’s
breeches and Corydalis
have delicate, fern-like
leaves and grow to about
a foot tall. Dutchman’s
breeches are more com-
mon. Te name comes
from the clusters of fra-
grant, white, pantaloon-
shaped fowers. Coryda-
lis fowers are pink or
yellow, tubular, and must
be appreciated up close.
Bloodroot has a solitary
white fower, with a gold-
en-orange center that
grows beside a lobed leaf.
Roots and stems have an
acrid red-orange juice,
thus the name bloodroot.
Flowers last for a very
short time and may be
hard to fnd afer March.
Two more woodland
fowers you are sure to
see are wild blue phlox
and wild geranium. Wild
blue phlox (Phlox divari-
cata) has loose clusters of
slightly fragrant light blue
fowers above creeping
oval leaves. Also called
wild sweet william, it will
bloom from April to June.
Wild geranium (Gerani-
um maculatum) is easily
recognized by its typical
geranium leaves and loose
clusters of lavender fow-
ers. It grows 1 to 2 feet tall
and is found from April to
June.
Tese are just a few
of the fowers to look
for while exploring our
woodlands this spring.
Take lots of pictures, but
please leave the wildfow-
ers. Although the ones
mentioned here are nu-
merous, some of our wild-
fowers are becoming rare.
Leaving them ensures that
they’ll remain for others
to see in the future.
— John Smith is an ag-
ricultural agent with the
Auglaize County Ohio
State University Extension
Office.
John
Smith
Lawn, Landscape
and Garden Line
Te following fourth
and ffh grade students at
Waynesfeld-Goshen El-
ementary have made the
Honor Roll for the third
nine-weeks grading pe-
riod.
4th GRDE
3.0 Honor Roll
Alysse Augsburger,
Austin Birt, Jordan Elliot,
Maddie Flinn, Madison
Hutchison, Evelyn Rege-
danz, and Shelby Douglas.
3.5 Honor Roll
Maddie Allen, Drake
Carmean, Ashley Cover,
Megan Eutsler, Hubertine
Feter, Jaden Hadding,
Acasia Layne and Saman-
tha Spencer.
4.0 Honor Roll
Rylie Barrington, Lau-
ren Case, Gracie Hayes,
Hyat Kaufman,Graham
Knerr, Peyton Spencer,
Kort Sutherland and
Claire Valenti.
5th GRDE
3.0 Honor Roll
Ethan Boday, Arlissa
Johnson, Lydia Jordan,
Cheyanne Lambert,
Grace Litle, Taylor Lowe,
Evan Miller, Gauge Rum-
er, Gavin Schneider, Jae-
lyn Schultz, Kyle Searson
and Landan Siebeneck.
3.5 Honor Roll
Emilie Allen, Emily
Case, Slaht Hunter, Jer-
emy Riemesch and Kenzi
Tate.
4.0 Honor Roll
Katrina Baumgardner,
Jenna Brinkman, Payton
Burden, Andrea Kirkend-
all and Cecilia Werner.
Air Force Airman Eric
M. Layman graduated
from basic military train-
ing at Lackland Air Force
Base, San Antonio, Texas.
The airman com-
pleted an intensive,
eight-week program that
included training in mili-
tary discipline and stud-
ies, Air Force core val-
ues, physical fitness, and
basic warfare principles
and skills.
Airmen who complete
basic training earn four
credits toward an asso-
ciate in applied science
degree through the Com-
munity College of the Air
Force.
Layman is the son of
Traci Honegger, of Crid-
ersville, and Tim Layman,
of Elida.
He is a 2011 graduate
of Elida High School.
Basic training graduation
Layman
• Tri-Moraine Audu-
bon Society will feature
“Hiking Te Buckeye
Trail: A 1,400 Mile Jour-
ney Around Ohio” at 7:30
p.m. on Tuesday, April 2
in the meeting room of
OSU-Lima’s Visitor and
Student Services Center,
3900 Campus Drive.
In the spring of 2011,
Andy Niekamp set out
on a hiking journey from
Dayton on Ohio’s Buck-
eye Trail.
Over 1,400 miles and
88 days later, Andy re-
turned to Dayton on this
longest circular trail in
the nation.
His presentation will
take you on a foot jour-
ney around Ohio accom-
panied by beautiful pho-
tos to acquaint you with
Ohio’s backyard trail.
Andy, who lives in Ket-
tering, is the founder and
leader of the DaytonHik-
ers.Org group and also the
lead adventurer for Out-
door Adventure Connec-
tion which specializes in
backcountry adventures.
He has hiked the entire
Appalachian Trail end to
end three times.
• Te St. Marys River
- Grand Lake St. Marys
Important Bird Area will
be the focus of a Tri-Mo-
raine Audubon Society
Saturday, April 27, feld
trip ofering the chance to
engage with the seasonal
return of Neotropical mi-
grant songbirds to their
temperate North Ameri-
can summer homes.
Tis trip will yield data
on migratory species, but
there are resident Bald
Eagles, and waterfowl
and shorebirds should be
around.
Field trippers will car-
pool departing at 9 am
from Lima’s Eastgate
Mall parking lot behind
Wendy’s on SR 309.
Tose wishing to meet
the group in St. Marys
should be at the north
end of 40-Acre Pond at
9:30 a.m.
Te group will also
visit the fsh hatchery and
state park area, and likely
other sites around the
lake - weather, time and
enthusiasm permiting.
Although some will like-
ly bird most of the day,
anyone available for part
of the day is welcome.
Dress appropriately for
the weather, bring bin-
oculars and feld guides,
and either bring your
lunch or spending money
for a quick stop in town.
Te trip is free and open
to the public; both be-
ginning and experienced
birders are welcome.
For additional infor-
mation, contact Eric
Juterbock at 419-995-
8360 (of ce) or juter-
bock.1@osu.edu.
Tri-Moraine Audubon news
Rose-Hulman Institite
of Technology announc-
es the winter quarter
Dean’s List.
Te following stu-
dents from the area were
named to the Dean’s List.
Caleb Comstock, of
Waynesfeld, and Mal-
lory McDevit, of Wapa-
koneta, have been named
to the Dean’s List.
In order to be named
to the Dean’s List, stu-
dents must earn at least
a 3.3 grade point average.
Comstock is a junior
studying civil engineer-
ing and McDevit is a
freshman studying elec-
trical engineering.
Te University of
Northwestern Ohio is
proud to acknowledge its
Dean’s List for November
Session 2012 for students
in the College of Applied
Technologies.
Te following full-time
students from the area re-
ceived a grade point aver-
age of 3.5 or beter:
Botkins
Maurer, Aaron Mi-
chael; Oellerman, Justin
Celina
Drees, Aaron C.;
Swann, Kenneth Todd;
Tobe, Ethan J.
Cridersville
Chess, Alan Keith;
Lyon, Louie Alex
Minster
Baker, Christopher Ga-
len
St. Marys
Alexander, Jason Ed-
ward; Hefner, Andrew J.;
Moorman, Mat S.
Spencerville
Wiechart, Jordan Mi-
chael
Wapakoneta
Azbell, Jacob Bernard;
Hoitink, Gregory Wil-
liam; Meadows, Keaton
Andrew
UNOH Dean’s List
5B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
BUSINESS
Spotlight
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305 E. State Street • Botkins
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Children's Children's Consignment Boutique
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Hours: Mon-Fri 11-6 • Sat 11-4 • Closed Sunday
OPEN EVENINGS & SATURDAYS
TEAM EQUIPMENT & UNIFORMS
Baseball, Softball, Track,
Soccer, Swimming, Volleyball
CUSTOM SCREENPRINTING - EMBROIDERY
Downtown St. Marys
121 W. Spring St.
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Come In & See Our New Finds
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104 E. Mason Rd. • Sidney
937-492-6937
M-W 9-6 • Th 9-1 • Fri 9-8 • Sat. 9-3
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Simply Sinatra
Sunday, April 14, 2013
7:00 PM
Gateway Arts Council presents...
2
3
7
5
1
9
3
Sidney High School
Auditorium
Tickets $19.00
AAA Members $18.00
Tickets available at
Ron & Nita’s,
Gateway Arts Council or
by calling 937-498-2787
You are
going
to swear it’s
Frank Sinatra
Study: Health overhaul to raise claims cost 32 percent
WASHINGTON (AP)
— Medical claims costs
— the biggest driver of
health insurance premi-
ums — will jump an aver-
age 32 percent for Ameri-
cans’ individual policies
under President Barack
Obama’s overhaul, ac-
cording to a study by the
nation’s leading group of
fnancial risk analysts.
Te report could turn
into a big headache for the
Obama administration at
a time when many parts of
the country remain skep-
tical about the Afordable
Care Act. Te estimates
were recently released by
the Society of Actuaries
to its members.
While some states will
see medical claims costs
per person decline, the re-
port concluded the over-
whelming majority will
see double-digit increases
in their individual health
insurance markets, where
people purchase coverage
directly from insurers.
Te disparities are
striking. By 2017, the es-
timated increase would
be 62 percent for Cali-
fornia, about 80 percent
for Ohio, more than 20
percent for Florida and
67 percent for Maryland.
Much of the reason for
the higher claims costs is
that sicker people are ex-
pected to join the pool,
the report said.
Te report did not
make similar estimates for
employer plans, the main-
stay for workers and their
families. Tat’s because
the primary impact of
Obama’s law is on people
who don’t have coverage
through their jobs.
Te administration
questions the design of
the study, saying it fo-
cused only on one piece
of the puzzle and ignored
cost relief strategies in the
law such as tax credits to
help people aford premi-
ums and special payments
to insurers who atract an
outsize share of the sick.
Te study also doesn’t
take into account the po-
tential price-cuting efect
of competition in new
state insurance markets
that will go live on Oct.
1, administration of cials
said.
At a White House brief-
ing on Tuesday, Health
and Human Services Sec-
retary Kathleen Sebelius
said some of what passes
for health insurance to-
day is so skimpy it can’t be
compared to the compre-
hensive coverage available
under the law. “Some of
these folks have very high
catastrophic plans that
don’t pay for anything un-
less you get hit by a bus,”
she said. “Tey’re really
mortgage protection, not
health insurance.”
A prominent national
expert, recently retired
Medicare chief actuary
Rick Foster, said the re-
port does “a credible job”
of estimating potential en-
rollment and costs under
the law, “without trying to
tilt the answers in any par-
ticular direction.”
“Having said that,” Fos-
ter added, “actuaries tend
to be fnancially conser-
vative, so the various as-
sumptions might be more
inclined to consider what
might go wrong than to
anticipate that everything
will work beautifully.” Ac-
tuaries use statistics and
economic theory to make
long-range cost projec-
tions for insurance and
pension programs spon-
sored by businesses and
government. Te society
is headquartered near
Chicago.
Kristi Bohn, an actuary
who worked on the study,
acknowledged it did not
atempt to estimate the
efect of subsidies, insurer
competition and other
factors that could mitigate
cost increases. She said
the goal was to look at the
underlying cost of medi-
cal care.
“Claims cost is the
most important driver of
health care premiums,”
she said.
“We don’t see our-
selves as a political orga-
nization,” Bohn added.
“We are trying to fgure
out what the situation at
hand is.”
On the plus side, the
report found the law will
cover more than 32 mil-
lion currently uninsured
Americans when fully
phased in. And some
states — including New
York and Massachusets
— will see double-digit
declines in costs for claims
in the individual market.
Charlie Brown’s Res-
taurant will celebrate
five years in business
this summer. Owner
Mike Brown opened
the restaurant in 2008
and has watched the
business grow.
“It is a truck stop
restaurant but it has
evolved to be a part of
the community,” Mike
said. “We do a lot of ca-
tering now for business
and weddings. Our staff
started with just seven
or eight people and we
now have more than 20
people working here.”
The staff and what
the restaurant offers
continues to grow all
the time.
Charlie Brown’s Res-
taurant updated their
specials and buffet with
new, high quality items.
On the Wednesday,
April 3, Charlie Brown
will host German Night
from 4:30 to 9 p.m.
with a full German buf-
fet and German enter-
tainment from 6 to 8
p.m.
On Saturday, April
13 the restaurant will
host a family friendly
Dinner Comedy Show.
Tickets include buffet
and entertainment and
are $12 for adults and
$8 for children 12 and
under. The buffet starts
at 4 p.m. with the show
starting at 5:30. Call
937-394-7378 for res-
ervations.
Every day the res-
taurant offers a lunch
buffets. On Saturdays
there is a breakfast
buffet and on Sundays
there is a brunch buffet
for the customers.
“People come here
for the great food, the
great atmosphere and
to see our great, friend-
ly staff,” Mike said.
“Sometimes people just
come in to see their fa-
vorite servers.”
Charlie Brown’s
Restaurant is located
at 14499 St. Rt. 119
East in Anna. Hours
are Monday through
Thursday from 6 a.m.
to 11 p.m., Friday from
6 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sat-
urday from 7 a.m. to 8
p.m. and Sunday from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. You can
call them at 937-394-
7378 or check them out
on Facebook.
Watch the Business
Builder every month
in the Wapakoneta
Daily News for new
and up coming specials
and events such as a
50s/60s night!
Charlie Brown’s Restaurant to offer all new specials/events
DENNIS THE MENACE
ZITS
SNUFFY SMITH
HI AND LOIS
FUNKY WINKERBEAN
CRANKSHAFT
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
BABY BLUES
Annie’s Mailbox
Bridge
Crossword Puzzle
LOCKHORNS
Horoscope
Having children is a non-negotiable issue
For Thursday, March 28, 2013
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is an exciting day, which is why you will
impulsively respond to situations and people
around you. New love or exciting flirtations
could make your day!
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You feel restless today, because you have the
feeling you’re waiting for the other shoe to
drop. (Invariably, it’s ugly and the wrong size.)
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
You can expect to meet someone who is a real
character today. Or possibly, someone you
know (especially in a group) will surprise you
or say something shocking.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Unexpected good news might come to you
today, especially through a boss, parent,
teacher or VIP. You might get a promotion or
unexpected praise.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Surprise opportunities to travel or explore
advantages in publishing, higher education,
medicine and the law might fall in your lap
today. (This window of opportunity will be
brief, so act fast.)
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Surprise gifts, goodies and favors from others
might come your way today. Don’t hesitate.
Accept what is yours, and just say, “Thank
you.”
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
A partner or close friend will catch you off-
guard today. This person might demand more
freedom in the relationship. (He or she will do
something unexpected.)
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
The good news is that you might get praise or
a raise today. The bad news is that computer
crashes, power outages and staff shortages
might dog your footsteps at work. Aaggh.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Surprise flirtations could make your heart go
pitter-patter today. (Eyes across a crowded
room, and all that.) Parents should be extra
vigilant, because this is an accident-prone day
for your kids.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Your home routine will be interrupted today.
You might run out of coffee or bread. Small
appliances might break down or minor break-
ages could occur. Surprise company might
knock at the door. (Yikes.)
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
This is an accident-prone day, so pay attention
to what you say and do. However, you also
might dream up genius ideas, because your
mind is percolating with energy!
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
You might find money; you might lose money.
You might buy a new, high-tech toy or alterna-
tively, something you own might be broken or
lost. It’s a crapshoot! (Anything could happen.)
YOU BORN TODAY You are an individualist
who is willing to accept what is going on
around you. You’re not afraid to be different;
you go after what you want. Because of your
honest expression, you have a great following.
(But you do need your privacy.) Get ready for
an exciting year ahead, because it’s the begin-
ning of a fresh new cycle.
Birthdate of: Lady Gaga, singer; Jennifer
Weiner, writer; Chris Barrie, actor.
(c) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Dear Annie: I am married
to a wonderful guy who has a
daughter by his ex-girlfriend. I
have not yet met my step-
daughter. Her mother has full
custody and won’t allow my
husband access.
I am older than my hus-
band by three years. I want to
have a child. Before we mar-
ried, my husband and I talked
about having kids. We talked
about it again last December,
and we agreed that it was time
to start a family.
Here’s the problem: He has
now decided he’s not ready. I
work in the maternity ward of a
local hospital, and I see the
complications older women
can have with pregnancy and
with delivery. I am getting
close to that age. I want to have
a healthy pregnancy and child,
but the longer we wait the
harder it will be. My feeling is
that one is never really “ready”
for kids, but you make the nec-
essary sacrifices to have some-
thing so amazing in your life.
I have asked my husband
why the sudden change in atti-
tude, and his only response is,
“I don’t know.” I’m getting
tired of that, but when I say so,
he replies, “I feel ya.” Totally
not helpful. I don’t want to
force him to have a baby, but I
want a family and am getting
tired of his excuses. I love my
husband, but this is driving me
crazy. How can I find out what
is really bothering him and get
him on the same page again?
-- Monica
Dear Monica: Whether or
not to have children is one of
those non-negotiable issues
that can break up a marriage.
Your husband is being evasive
and seems uninterested in the
idea of children. We wonder
why he hasn’t fought harder to
be a part of his daughter’s life.
If having a child is crucial to
you, your husband needs to
know that you are willing to
leave the marriage in order to
find a more cooperative part-
ner. Frankly, we aren’t sure he
will make any effort to stop
you.
Dear Annie: I have worked
in the restaurant industry all of
my life. Our place is near a
clinic. It’s one thing to leave
gum under the tables, but I am
amazed at the number of peo-
ple who leave their used ban-
dages, cotton and surgical tape.
They just put it on their plate
and expect us to dispose of it.
Yuck.
I understand that these
people are coming to eat after
having procedures done, and I
am grateful for their business.
But would it be too much to
ask that they dispose of these
medical bandages in the bath-
room garbage? It’s pretty dis-
gusting to have these things on
the table. -- A Waitress, Not a
Nurse
Dear Waitress: We agree.
Since you get a lot of clinic
customers, you can ask man-
agement about posting a sign
asking people to dispose of
post-procedure bandages in a
specially designated “hazard-
ous waste” container in the
bathroom. But some people
will leave them on the table
regardless. It might be wise to
talk to management about hav-
ing a box of disposable gloves
that can be worn when clearing
the tables.
Dear Annie: This is for
“Concerned,” who objected to
having his late wife’s photo dis-
played at his granddaughter’s
wedding.
When my daughter mar-
ried, she had a table in the
lounge area with photos of
both sets of parents, even
though one set was divorced.
No one objected, including the
new significant others. She
also included photographs of
all four sets of grandparents,
even though three were
deceased.
The bride could put a pic-
ture of her grandfather and
grandmother together, and
also one of the grandfather
with his new wife. Seems a no-
brainer to me, and it’s silly of
the grandfather to be so petty
about it. Weddings are head-
aches enough. -- Grateful We
Get Along in My World
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to annies-
mailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254.
COMICS
6B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
CLASSIFIEDS
7B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
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W A P A K O N E T A
Tastemorr Snacks
have a variety of posi-
tions available that
might be an ideal fit for
you.
* P R O D U C T I O N
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If you’re looking for Full
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bonus programs. Must
have good work history
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a must. Got questions
or want to schedule an
interview? Call 419-
605-9660. We also
accept resumes at
careers@tastemorr.co
m.
Tastemorr Snacks
300 East Vine Street,
Coldwater, Ohio 45828
EOE
JT’s Brew & Grill now
accepting applications
for servers & bar-
tenders. Apply Mon. -
Fri. 2:00 p.m. - 4:00
p.m.
APPLY
NOW!
HELP WANTED
FENIX, LLC
Wapakoneta, OH
Production Team
Members
Seeking team mem-
bers who want to build
a career with our grow-
ing company. The ideal
candidate should be
highly motivated, excel
in team environments
and, have 3-5 years of
manufacturing experi-
ence. The plant oper-
ates on a 12-hour shift
basis with current
openings on the 7pm to
7am shift. We offer a
highly competitive
wage and full benefits.
Please send resumes
to:
HUMAN RESOURCES
319 S. Vine St.
Fostoria, OH 44830
Class-A CDL Drivers
Regional positions
Palletized, Truckload,
Vans
2yrs. experience
required
Health, Dental, Life,
401K
Call us today!
1-800-288-6168
www.RisingSunExpres
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Full-time Financial
Professional position
with benefit package.
Contact: James Valent,
james.valent@kofc.org
or (740)280-0280.
Must be eligible for
membership in Knights
of Columbus.
HELP WANTED
partnering with
is currently seeking
Robotic Welders and
Production Line
Assemblers!!
Shifts available-1st and
2nd
Setex offers a great
work atmosphere in a
climate controlled envi-
ronment!!!
Requirements:
*High school diploma
or GED
*Valid Drivers License
*Minimum of 6 months
experience
*Clean Criminal
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*Ability to pass com-
prehensive laboratory
drug screen
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$10.00/hr with increas-
es every 3 months
Monthly Attendance
Bonus
Don’t hesitate, apply
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*Immediate Openings*
-Call MANPOWER at
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schedule an interview-
Or apply on-line at
manpowerjobs.com
No direct phone calls to
Setex will be accepted.
Applications only
accepted through
Manpower
HELP WANTED
NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY!
Someone to deliver
newspapers in New
Bremen. Can
e a r n b e t w e e n
$100.00 to $600.00
or more a month for
just a few hours a
day.
(Depending on the
number of deliver-
ies)
Apply in Person at:
The Evening Leader
102 E. Spring St.
St. Marys, Oh 45885
help
wanted
Looking for part-time
bartender. Weekends
& background check
required. Contact 419-
394-3792 for more info
L&S Express; Looking
for a Class A CDL
Driver. Call 419-394-
7077 between 8AM to
5PM or email
lsexpress@bright.net
Experienced short
order cook, some
weekends. Drop
resume off at the Inn
Between, corner of
25A and 274.
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ad right now?
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your Classified ad
today! Don't forget to
ask about centering
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HELP WANTED
Free for the hauling.
Upright piano and
bench. Dark wood.
Packard brand.
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MISC. ITEMS
FOR SALE
Wapak
1206 Oakridge Court –
Thursday, Friday 9-7.
Home/yard decor,
rugs, furniture, Duratub
sink, wine rack, new-
born–5T, teen, adult
brand name clothing,
black size 8 prom
gown, toys, highchair.
Great Prices !
GARAGE SALES
Williams Tax Service
with 2 locations: 8
South Blackhoof
Street, Wapakoneta at
419-738-4494 and 307
East Spring Street, St.
Marys at 419-300-
8653. Personal,
Business, and Farm
Income Taxes. Hours:
M-F 9-5; Sat. 9-1;
Other Hours by
Appointment.
Rubber Stamps,
Printing services. We
handle all types of cus-
tom printing and adver-
tising needs. See us
today! Wapakoneta
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Industrial Dr.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio
45895. 419-738-2128.
Photo restoration: Do
you have old photos
that are torn or faded
or otherwise dam-
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serve your family's
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pictures. I will scan
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it via the computer, and
reprint an image for
you. Reasonable rates,
charged by the hour.
Contact John at 419-
738-1250 or via email
at jzwez@woh.rr.com
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45895. 419-738-2128.
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BUSINESS
SERVICES
MISSING: Male black
cat, has front and back
claws. Young and
friendly estimated age
to be near one year.
(Not exactly sure as he
was a rescue.) He is
dearly missed! We are
prepared to offer
$100.00 reward for
safe return. Last seen
at 902 Jackson St. If
any information please
contact Edward at
(419)733-8016 or
Ashlie at (937)489-
9582
LOST AND
FOUND
Notice
Lending
Opportunities
Borrow smart. Contact
the Ohio Division of
Financial Institutions’
Office of Consumer
Affairs BEFORE you
refinance your home or
obtain a loan.
BEWARE of requests
for any large advance
payment of fees or
insurance. Call the
Office of Consumer
Affairs toll free at 1-
866-278-0003 to learn
if the mortgage broker
or lender is properly
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CLASSIFIEDS
T
h
e
W
a
p
a
k
o
n
e
t
a
D
a
i
l
y
N
e
w
s
4
1
9
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7
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2
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The
Wapakoneta Daily News
South Koreans worry about nuclear threat
By TOM LASSETER
McClatchy Newspapers
SEOUL, South Ko-
rea (MCT) — Sipping
an iced cofee toward
the back of a tony cafe in
Seoul’s Gangnam district,
where cash fows to luxu-
ry boutiques and plastic
surgeons, Kim Ha-young
paused to consider the
madness of war.
A week earlier, North
Korea had said it would
“exercise the right to a
pre-emptive nuclear at-
tack,” puting a rhetori-
cal bull’s-eye on South
Korea’s capital. Just last
month, North Korea car-
ried out what state media
there described as a “test
of a smaller and lighter A-
bomb.”
“I even had this conver-
sation with my husband:
‘If war breaks out, where
should we go? Where
should we hide? Where
should we meet up?’ “ said
Kim, 33, a graphic design-
er with matching pearl
jewelry and a large Louis
Vuiton handbag.
Te glitering city of
Seoul sits less than 30
miles, as the missile fies,
from the demilitarized
zone that splits the Ko-
rean Peninsula, an un-
easy reminder of the war
that ended in 1953 with
a cease-fre but no peace
treaty. From the ashes of
that confict, South Korea
grew into an economic
jewel, while North Korea
hardened into a milita-
rized recluse of a nation
that lashed out at the
world even as its people
starved.
Afer decades of agree-
ments brokered and bro-
ken, North Korea today
is a bigger nuclear threat
than ever, and no one
seems to have a solu-
tion for what is, by all ac-
counts, an increasingly
tense situation.
Last week, Defense
Secretary Chuck Hagel
announced that the Unit-
ed States would move 14
more missile intercep-
tors to Alaska to counter
North Korea. It was a re-
action to North Korea’s
December launch of a
satellite into space, seen as
a cover for testing its bal-
listic missile program, fol-
lowed two months later
by the successful nuclear
detonation.
While experts don’t
think the North Koreans
have developed a nuclear
device small enough to
top a missile, most think
it’s headed that way. Sen.
James Inhofe, R-Okla.,
the ranking member of
the Senate Armed Ser-
vices Commitee, issued
a statement calling the
beefed-up missile defense
“a much-needed measure
of protection against the
North Korean threat.”
Analysts here, how-
ever, remain divided.
Many think North Korea’s
nuclear program isn’t so
much a menace to Ameri-
can shores as it is a gambit
to win a beter bargaining
position for international
aid.
Or a means to show
strength domestically. Or
a way to deter the United
States and South Korea
from intervening militar-
ily. Or, perhaps, a combi-
nation of all of those.
Still, there are lingering
questions about North
Korea’s intentions. Kim’s
hold on the regime and
his ability to judge the
implications of his actions
have been unclear since
he took power afer his
father’s death 15 months
ago. He recently hosted
former American basket-
ball star Dennis Rodman
and three members of the
Harlem Globetroters,
and Rodman later said
that Kim, who’s thought
to be about 30 years old,
had urged him to ask
President Barack Obama
to call him. Shortly afer,
however, North Korean
state media carried a For-
eign Ministry statement
that spoke of waging nu-
clear war to “destroy the
strongholds of the aggres-
sors.”
Outside the cafe in
Gangnam, Park Jong-in
shrugged at the bombast
from North Korea. “Peo-
ple around me have been
buying water and other
things,” said Park, 28, a
hairstylist who was wear-
ing expensive headphones
and black circle-framed
eyeglasses. “But because
they” — North Korea’s
leaders — “have done
this so many times, I don’t
care.”
Life in Gangnam, a
district whose name was
made internationally fa-
mous by the Korean pop
song “Gangnam Style”
lampooning its consumer
culture, went on as usual
last week. Expensive cars
cruised by Te Ritz-Carl-
ton. Shoppers wandered
down Rodeo Street,
whose name is a wink
at Beverly Hills’ Rodeo
Drive.
Park likened being in
Seoul to his years living
in Japan: While people
there feared earthquakes,
he said, there was nothing
to do but go on living life.
How best to address
North Korea has been a
deeply divisive question
in South Korea. During
a decade that began with
the presidency of Kim
Dae-jung in 1998, Seoul
pursued a “sunshine poli-
cy” that sought beter re-
lations with North Korea
through dialogue, aid and
economic cooperation.
Tat stance was contro-
versial with some: Kwon,
for instance, was sen-
tenced to prison in 1998
for his role in a campaign
to smear Kim as having
links to Pyongyang. Kwon
said he preferred not to
discuss the mater.
In 2003, one of Kim’s
closest aides was con-
victed in a case related
to money being paid to
North Korea before a
summit between the na-
tions.
Te sunshine policy
was shunted aside afer
an election at the end of
2007 that ushered in lead-
ership with a harder line
toward North Korea.
Tom Lasseter/MCT
“Unless South Korea and the United States are deter-
mined to have a nuclear war, then North Korea is able
to continue its provocations and attacks because they
know there is this limitation,” says Kwon Young-hae,
who served as South Korea’s defense minister and
then the head of national intelligence in the 1990s.
CLASSIFIEDS
8B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
–Assistant Water Park Manager–
Te City of Wapakoneta is currently taking
applications for the position of Assistant Water
Park Manager. Must be 21 years of age or
older and have Lifeguard Training Certifcate
or be able to obtain one before opening day.
Approximately 30 hours per week; days,
evenings and some weekends. Tis position
will be responsible for twenty plus employees
and daily money management. Looking for
applicants who are energetic, enthusiastic,
team oriented and have great customer
service skills. Tis is a seasonal position, no
benefts are provided.
Please apply in person at
Wapakoneta City Hall,
701 Parlette Court
no later than April 5th, 2013
M S I ENVIRONMENTAL
MIKE’S SANITATION INC.
We operate in compliance with the U.S. and Ohio EPA, State and
County Health Departments, ODA, ODOT and OSHA to provide our
customers and Neighbors with the most Responsible and Safe
ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, SEPTIC TANK CLEANING
and PORTABLE TOILET RENTALS
Call 1-800-786-3691 for COMPETITIVE PRICING 937-497-0011
Need Technology Help?
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between
Leave a message
I can help with just about anything
and at reasonable prices!
Have computer parts you want gone? I'll take anything!
AMISH CREW
Any carpentry, framing, siding,
roofing, garages, remodeling
Attention Farmers: Pole barns,
new barns, painting, repair work,
clean fence rows & ditch banks.
References & Reasonable
30 Years Experience 419-733-6309
COMMUNITY BOARD
Your connection to local businesses and services.
EVERYDAY ERRANDS EVERYDAY ERRANDS
Call Saira at (419) 738-4098
Helping The Elderly When
A Little Help Is All You Need!
- Grocery - Doctors - Bank - Hair
Are you living alone, but
sometimes need help?
I would be happy to
assist you after school!
VOTED BEST PLACE TO BUY
ELECTRONICS 9 YEARS IN A ROW
by Readers of The Evening Leader
and the Wapakoneta Daily News
55 Years in
Business
WOW! FOWLER’S TV
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52 Payments of
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Due Down - $262.95
1 Block N. of Hospital,1301 E. Spring St. • 419-394-5316
Hours: M & F 9:30-8; T, W, TH 9:30-7, Sat. 9:30-3
WE SERVICE
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New Lawn Seeding • Lawn Renovations
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Wapakoneta, OH 45895
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(419) 657-2298
Swoveland
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AMISH CONSTRUCTION CREW
• New Construction & Home Remolding
• Pole Barns, Garages & Patios
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419-890-5300
or Cell
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SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE.
Revised Code Sec.
2329.26. THE STATE
OF OHIO, AUGLAIZE
COUNTY. JP Morgan
Chase Bank, N.A.
Plaintiff vs. Lowell
Chilcoat et al.,
Defendant. COMMON
PLEAS COURT CASE
NO.: 2013 CV 0003 In
pursuance of an Order
of Sale in the above
entitled action, I will
offer for sale at public
auction, at The
Auglaize County
Sheriff’s Office, 1051
Dearbaugh Avenue,
Wapakoneta, in the
above named County,
on Thursday, the
11th day of April
2013, at 1:30 o’clock
p.m., the following
described real estate,
situated in the County
of Auglaize and State
of Ohio, to wit: Parcel
No. B0533202000
Complete Legal
Description can be
located in the Auglaize
County Recorder’s
Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Located at 20 East
Lake Drive,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Appraised at
$51,000.00 and cannot
be sold for less than
two-thirds of that
amount. This appraisal
does not include an
interior examination of
the premises. TERMS
OF SALE: 10% on
day of sale and bal-
ance upon confirma-
tion of sale and deliv-
ery of deed. Taxes
shall be payable to
date of confirmation of
deed, including prorat-
ed current year taxes.
Tyler G. Shank,
Attorney 513-241-3100
Allen F. Solomon,
Sheriff of Auglaize
County, Ohio.
67-73-79
County, on Thursday,
the 11th day of April
2013, at 1:30 o’clock
p.m., the following
described real estate,
situated in the County
of Auglaize and State
of Ohio, to wit: Parcel
No. L3303201200
Complete Legal
Description can be
located in the Auglaize
County Recorder’s
Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Located at 14292 SR
65, Wapakoneta,
Ohio. Said Premises
Appraised at
$51,000.00 and cannot
be sold for less than
two-thirds of that
amount. This appraisal
does not include an
interior examination of
the premises. TERMS
OF SALE: 10% on
day of sale and bal-
ance upon confirma-
tion of sale and deliv-
ery of deed. Taxes
shall be payable to
date of confirmation of
deed, including prorat-
ed current year taxes.
Laura C. Infante,
Attorney 330-436-0300
Allen F. Solomon,
Sheriff of Auglaize
County, Ohio.
67-73-79
LEGAL NOTICES
SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE.
Revised Code Sec.
2329.26. THE STATE
OF OHIO, AUGLAIZE
COUNTY. Nationstar
Mortgage, LLC Plaintiff
vs. Randy Paxton et
al., Defendant. COM-
MON PLEAS COURT
CASE NO.: 2012 CV
0335 In pursuance of
an Order of Sale in
the above entitled
action, I will offer for
sale at public auction,
at The Auglaize
County Sheriff’s Office,
1051 Dearbaugh
Avenue, Wapakoneta,
in the above named
SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE.
Revised Code Sec.
2329.26. THE STATE
OF OHIO, AUGLAIZE
COUNTY. Self Help
Ventures Fun, Plaintiff
vs. Troy Shade et al.,
Defendant. COMMON
PLEAS COURT CASE
NO.: 2012 CV 0284 In
pursuance of an Order
of Sale in the above
entitled action, I will
offer for sale at public
auction, at The
Auglaize County
Sheriff’s Office, 1051
Dearbaugh Avenue,
Wapakoneta, in the
above named County,
on Thursday, the
18th day of April
2013, at 1:30 o’clock
p.m., the following
described real estate,
situated in the County
of Auglaize and State
of Ohio, to wit: Parcel
No. B0702002000
Complete Legal
Description can be
located in the Auglaize
County Recorder’s
Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Located at 702 South
Ohio Street,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Appraised at
$72,000.00 and cannot
be sold for less than
two-thirds of that
amount. This appraisal
does not include an
interior examination of
the premises. TERMS
OF SALE: 10% on
day of sale and bal-
ance upon confirma-
tion of sale and deliv-
ery of deed. Taxes
shall be payable to
date of confirmation of
deed, including prorat-
ed current year taxes.
Joseph M. Henkel,
Attorney 413-241-3100
Allen F. Solomon,
Sheriff of Auglaize
County, Ohio.
73-79-85
Appraised at
$90,000.00 and cannot
be sold for less than
two-thirds of that
amount. This appraisal
does not include an
interior examination of
the premises. TERMS
OF SALE: 10% on
day of sale and bal-
ance upon confirma-
tion of sale and deliv-
ery of deed. Taxes
shall be payable to
date of confirmation of
deed, including prorat-
ed current year taxes.
Lorelie C. Bolohan,
Attorney (513)241-
3100 Allen F. Solomon,
Sheriff of Auglaize
County, Ohio.
67-73-79
LEGAL NOTICES
SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE.
Revised Code Sec.
2329.26. THE STATE
OF OHIO, JP Morgan
Chase Bank, N.A.,
Plaintiff vs. Penny L.
Cook, et al.,
Defendant. COMMON
PLEAS COURT CASE
NO.: 2012 CV 0254 In
pursuance of an Alias
Order of Sale in the
above entitled action,
I will offer for sale at
public auction, at The
Auglaize County
Sheriff’s Office, 1051
Dearbaugh Avenue,
Wapakoneta, in the
above named County,
on Thursday, the
11th day of April,
2013, at 1:30 o’clock
p.m., the following
described real estate,
situated in the County
of Auglaize and State
of Ohio, to wit: Parcel
No. N4200701400
Complete Legal
Description can be
located in the Auglaize
County Recorder’s
Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Located at 205 Ohio
Street, Waynesfield,
Ohio. Said Premises
SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE.
Revised Code Sec.
2329.26. THE STATE
OF OHIO, AUGLAIZE
COUNTY. JP Morgan
Chase Bank, N.A.,
Plaintiff vs. Jeremy L.
Foust, et al.,
Defendant. COMMON
PLEAS COURT CASE
NO.: 2012 CV 0239 In
pursuance of an Alias
Order of Sale in the
above entitled action,
I will offer for sale at
public auction, at The
Auglaize County
Sheriff’s Office, 1051
Dearbaugh Avenue,
Wapakoneta, in the
above named County,
on Thursday, the
18th day of April,
2013, at 1:30 o’clock
p.m., the following
described real estate,
situated in the County
of Auglaize and State
of Ohio, to wit: Parcel
No. B0703400300
Complete Legal
Description can be
located in the Auglaize
County Recorder’s
Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Located at 909 Middle
Street, Wapakoneta,
Ohio. Said Premises
Appraised at
$63,000.00 and cannot
be sold for less than
two-thirds of that
amount. This appraisal
does not include an
interior examination of
the premises. TERMS
OF SALE: 10% on
day of sale and bal-
ance upon confirma-
tion of sale and deliv-
ery of deed. Taxes
shall be payable to
date of confirmation of
deed, including prorat-
ed current year taxes.
Scott P. Ciupak,
Attorney (330)425-
4201 Allen F. Solomon,
Sheriff of Auglaize
County, Ohio.
73-79-85
LEGAL NOTICES
SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE.
Revised Code Sec.
2329.26. THE STATE
OF OHIO, AUGLAIZE
COUNTY. Household
Realty Corporation
Plaintiff vs. Yolanda
Jo Ellison, et al.,
Defendant. COMMON
PLEAS COURT CASE
NO.: 2012 CV 0210 In
pursuance of an Alias
Order of Sale in the
above entitled action,
I will offer for sale at
public auction, at The
Auglaize County
Sheriff’s Office, 1051
Dearbaugh Avenue,
Wapakoneta, in the
above named County,
on Thursday, the
18th day of April,
2013, at 1:30 o’clock
p.m., the following
described real estate,
situated in the County
of Auglaize and State
of Ohio, to wit: Parcel
No. F1903601100
Complete Legal
Description can be
located in the Auglaize
County Recorder’s
Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Located at 11864
National Road,
Cridersville, Ohio.
Said Premises
Appraised at
$81,000.00 and cannot
be sold for less than
two-thirds of that
amount. This appraisal
does not include an
interior examination of
the premises. TERMS
OF SALE: 10% on
day of sale and bal-
ance upon confirma-
tion of sale and deliv-
ery of deed. Taxes
shall be payable to
date of confirmation of
deed, including prorat-
ed current year taxes.
John D. Clunk,
Attorney (330)436-
0300 Allen F. Solomon,
Sheriff of Auglaize
County, Ohio.
73-79-85
11th day of April
2013, at 1:30 o’clock
p.m., the following
described real estate,
situated in the County
of Auglaize and State
of Ohio, to wit: Parcel
No. B0700803200
Complete Legal
Description can be
located in the Auglaize
County Recorder’s
Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Located at 107 East
Pearl Street,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Appraised at
$72,000.00 and cannot
be sold for less than
two-thirds of that
amount. This appraisal
does not include an
interior examination of
the premises. TERMS
OF SALE: 10% on
day of sale and bal-
ance upon confirma-
tion of sale and deliv-
ery of deed. Taxes
shall be payable to
date of confirmation of
deed, including prorat-
ed current year taxes.
Pamela A. Fehring,
Attorney 513-241-3100
Allen F. Solomon,
Sheriff of Auglaize
County, Ohio.
67-73-79
LEGAL NOTICES
SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE.
Revised Code Sec.
2329.26. THE STATE
OF OHIO, AUGLAIZE
COUNTY. JP Morgan
Chase Bank, N.A.
Plaintiff vs. Albert
Campos et al.,
Defendant. COMMON
PLEAS COURT CASE
NO.: 2012 CV 0200 In
pursuance of an Alias
Order of Sale in the
above entitled action,
I will offer for sale at
public auction, at The
Auglaize County
Sheriff’s Office, 1051
Dearbaugh Avenue,
Wapakoneta, in the
above named County,
on Thursday, the
SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE.
Revised Code Sec.
2329.26. THE STATE
OF OHIO, AUGLAIZE
COUNTY. USA
Through Rural
Development, Plaintiff
vs. Deron S.A.
Fiebelkorn et al.,
Defendant. COMMON
PLEAS COURT CASE
NO.: 2010 CV 0052 In
pursuance of an Order
of Sale in the above
entitled action, I will
offer for sale at public
auction, at The
Auglaize County
Sheriff’s Office, 1051
Dearbaugh Avenue,
Wapakoneta, in the
above named County,
on Thursday, the
18th day of April
2013, at 1:30 o’clock
p.m., the following
described real estate,
situated in the County
of Auglaize and State
of Ohio, to wit: Parcel
No. B0706600500
Complete Legal
Description can be
located in the Auglaize
County Recorder’s
Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Located at 119 S.
Wentz Street,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Appraised at
$39,000.00 and cannot
be sold for less than
two-thirds of that
amount. This appraisal
does not include an
interior examination of
the premises. TERMS
OF SALE: 10% on
day of sale and bal-
ance upon confirma-
tion of sale and deliv-
ery of deed. Taxes
shall be payable to
date of confirmation of
deed, including prorat-
ed current year taxes.
Gilbert L. Rieger,
Attorney 330-392-6171
Allen F. Solomon,
Sheriff of Auglaize
County, Ohio.
73-79-85
Attorney of the delin-
quent lands tax certifi-
cate or master list of
delinquent tracts and
prior to the transfer of
the deed of the proper-
ty to the purchaser fol-
lowing confirmation of
sale.
ALLEN F. SOLOMON,
SHERIFF
EDWIN A. PIERCE,
PROSECUTING
ATTORNEY
TERMS: $1000.00
Down day of Sale,
Balance on Delivery of
Deed
61-67-73
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF SALE
UNDER JUDGMENT
OF FORECLOSURE
OF LIENS FOR
DELINQUENT LAND
TAXES IN THE
AUGLAIZE COUNTY
COMMON PLEASE
COURT, CIVIL DIVI-
SION CASE NO.:
2012-CV-0060 IN THE
MATTER OF FORE-
CLOSURE OF LIENS
FOR DELINQUENT
TAXES APRIL BOW-
ERSOCK, AUGLAIZE
COUNTY TREASUR-
ER, Plaintiff vs.
SHANE COCHRANE,
ET AL., Defendants
Whereas, judgment
has been rendered
against certain parcels
of real property for
taxes, assessments,
charges, penalties,
interest, and costs as
follows: PARCEL NO:
N 4 2 - 0 0 2 - 0 1 6 - 0 0
LOCATED: 100 Elm
Street, Waynesfield,
OH 45896
Situated in the County
of Auglaize in the State
of Ohio and in the
Village of Waynesfield:
Lot Number Fifty (50)
in Sproul Bros.
Addition to the Village
of Waynesfield, Ohio.
Subject to all ease-
ments and restrictions
of record.
Auglaize County
Permanent Parcel No.:
N42-002-016-00
LAST KNOWN OWN-
ERS: Shane Cochrane
and; Whereas, such
judgment orders such
real property be sold by
the undersigned to sat-
isfy the total amount of
such judgment of
$2,561.77; Now, there-
fore, public notice is
hereby given that I,
Allen F. Solomon of
Auglaize County, Ohio,
will sell such real prop-
erty at public auction,
for cash, to the highest
bidder of an amount
that equals at least
$2,561.77, plus all
taxes, assessments,
charges, penalties, and
interest payable subse-
quent to the delivery to
the Prosecuting
Attorney of the delin-
quent land tax certifi-
cate or master list of
delinquent tracts and
prior to the transfer of
the deed of the proper-
ty to the purchaser fol-
lowing confirmation of
sale, at 1:30 p.m. at the
Auglaize County
Sheriff’s Office, 1051
Dearbaugh Avenue,
Wapakoneta, Ohio, on
Thursday, the 4th day
of April, 2013. If any
parcel does not receive
a sufficient bid, it shall
be offered for sale,
under the same terms
and conditions of the
first sale and at the
same time of day and
at the same place, on
Thursday, the 18th day
of April, 2013 for an
amount that equals at
least $2,561.77, plus
all taxes, assessments,
charges, penalties, and
interest payable subse-
quent to the delivery to
the Prosecuting
Susana E. Lykins,
Attorney (513)241-
3100 Allen F. Solomon,
Sheriff of Auglaize
County, Ohio.
67-73-79
LEGAL NOTICES
SHERIFF’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE.
Revised Code Sec.
2329.26. THE STATE
OF OHIO, AUGLAIZE
COUNTY. Chase
Home Finance LLC,
Plaintiff vs. Lucricia L.
Anderson, et al.,
Defendant. COMMON
PLEAS COURT CASE
NO.: 2011 CV 0017 In
pursuance of an Alias
Order of Sale in the
above entitled action,
I will offer for sale at
public auction, at The
Auglaize County
Sheriff’s Office, 1051
Dearbaugh Avenue,
Wapakoneta, in the
above named County,
on Thursday, the
11th day of April,
2013, at 1:30 o’clock
p.m., the following
described real estate,
situated in the County
of Auglaize and State
of Ohio, to wit: Parcel
No. F1900300900
Complete Legal
Description can be
located in the Auglaize
County Recorder’s
Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Located at 9998 Main
Street Road,
Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Said Premises
Appraised at
$81,000.00 and cannot
be sold for less than
two-thirds of that
amount. This appraisal
does not include an
interior examination of
the premises. TERMS
OF SALE: 10% on
day of sale and bal-
ance upon confirma-
tion of sale and deliv-
ery of deed. Taxes
shall be payable to
date of confirmation of
deed, including prorat-
ed current year taxes.
LEGAL NOTICES
Moped’s. New & Used.
Parts, service &
repairs. Lyle’s Moped’s
12th & Main St.
Delphos, (419) 692-
0249
MOPEDS
2001 Mansion, 16x70 2
bedroom, 2 bath, new
carpet, appliances,
central air, 19 Camelot
Drive, $25,800.
(567)204-1355
MOBILE
HOMES FOR
SALE
Attention Spring
Builders!! Gorgeous
country 2.5-4.9 acre
building lot ready for
your new home.
Permits approved. Call
Krites Realty (419)303-
6310
LOTS FOR
SALE
New Knoxville
3BR, 2.5 bath, finished
basement, shed, paver
patio, hot tub, play set.
Asking $229,900.00
Call 419-753-3270
HOMES FOR
SALE
For rent in New
Bremen New 3 bed-
room house, gas heat,
C/A, 1 car garage. Call
419-629-2838
3 bedroom, 2 bath
duplex in Cridersville.
Appliances furnished,
$675/mo, plus utilities,
deposit required.
Immediate possession,
Call Krites Realty
(419)303-6310
HOUSE FOR
RENT
Williamsburg Square
Townhomes
1400 W. Market St.
Celina, OH 45822
“A Great Place to
Call Home”
Currently Accepting
Applications
Offering spacious 2
and 3 bedroom town-
homes. Handicap
Accessible 4 bedroom
townhomes conve-
niently located to
Celina Schools,
Fairgrounds and
Bryson Pool! 1-1/2
baths, all major appli-
ances, including dish-
washers are provided.
Beautiful Community
Room and Computer
lab are available for
resident use. Contact
Sabrina Bailey at 419-
586-2850 for a tour.
Income restrictions
apply. Managed by
Gorsuch Management.
This institution is an
equal opportunity
employer. TTY/TTD
800-750-0750.
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
Spacious, total electric
1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments in St. Marys.
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Pets accepted.
Deposit only $200.00
419-394-8509
Now Accepting
Applications
Beech Tree Hill
Apartments 416
Beech St.
St. Marys, Ohio 45885
419-394-5396
Mon. & Wed. 8:00 am-
4:30 pm Tues. & Thurs.
3:00 pm-6:00 pm
2 bedroom apartments
with appliances fur-
nished. On site laundry
facility. Call for details
or pick up an applica-
tion at the rental office.
Possibility of rental
assistance. Equal
Housing Opportunity.
TDD#419-526-0466
“This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider, and employ-
er.”
Laurelwood and
Riverside 1 & 2 bed-
room furnished and
unfurnished apart-
ments, no pets, for
more information call
S c h l e n k e r
D e v e l o p m e n t s
(419)738-8111
1 bedroom apartment
All electric, A/C, most
utilities included. No
pets. $425/month in
New Bremen.
www.meadowviewter-
race.com
419-629-3174
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
Dependable babysitter
needed in my home.
Please call 419-953-
8136
CHILD CARE
GLM Transport hiring
for our regional fleet.
Safety, performance
and referral bonus pro-
grams. 401(k) and
direct deposit. Home
on weekends. Mileage
paid via PC Miler prac-
tical miles. Call (419)
238-2155 for details.
Drivers
WANTED
DRIVERS
Hot Deals!
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