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Thursday, March 20, 2014

March 20, 2014

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DAILY NEWS
W A P A K O N E T A
BRIDGE DEMOLITION
St. Marys eyes reusing parts elsewhere
LOCAL, 2A
MISSING JETLINER
Debris sighted southwest of Perth, Australia
WORLD, 6A
W-G mulls armed personnel on site
By JOHN BUSH
STAFF WRITER
At a parent advisory
meeting Tuesday night,
Waynesfeld-Goshen Local
Schools Superintendent
Chris Pfster announced
that the administration will
be releasing a survey ask-
ing parents if they support
having a well-trained em-
ployee carrying a frearm in
the building during school
hours.
Te district has not yet
writen the survey, but
Pfster said the questions
would be structured to
provide parents and other
community members with
suf cient information to
make a decision.
“When we survey the
community, we’re gonna
need to explain exactly
what we’re talking about,
and we have to defne what
we mean by well-trained,”
Pfster said.
Te issue of whether or
not an armed employee
increases the protection of
students during a school
shooting is a topic that has
been debated extensively
since the December 2012
shooting in Newtown,
Conn., where a gunman
killed 20 children and six
adults at Sandy Hook El-
ementary.
Some schools across
the country have amped
up their security by hiring
an armed school resource
Staf photo/Michelle Meunier
The James Digital Mammography Services bus visited Miller Textiles on Thursday to allow employees and their spouses to take
advantage of the unit’s services.
Mammography bus visits Miller’s
By MICHELLE MEUNIER
STAFF WRITER
Te Ohio State Univer-
sity Comprehensive Can-
cer Center - James Cancer
Hospital and Solove Re-
search Insititute debuted
their mobile mammogra-
phy unit in May of 2009,
which is also known as the
James. Te James Mobile
Mammography Program
is accredited by the Amer-
ican College of Radiology.
Te mobile unit is the
frst in central Ohio to
ofer 100 percent digital
X-ray capabilities, and
travels to area businesses
who want to ofer mam-
mography screenings to
their employees over the
age of 40.
Human resources di-
rector of Miller’s Textile
Services, Vickie Roby, frst
learned about the James
six years ago while atend-
ing a regional wellness
meeting.
Roby said one of the
companies at the meeting
she atended mentioned
that they were bringing
the bus to their site.
“I then contacted James
Cancer Mammography
unit and was put on a
waiting list as their sched-
ule was full,” Roby said. “I
was on the waiting list for
two years until they had an
opening.”
According to Roby,
Miller’s Textile Services
was able to get onto the
James’ schedule in 2011,
c u r r e n t l y
puting them
in their fourth year of of-
fering this opportunity
to their employees and
spouses of employees.
“Te purpose of ofer-
ing this event on site is that
it makes it easy for our em-
ployees to get their annual
mammogram,” Roby said.
“It is convenient, does
not take much time and is
completely confdential.”
One of the most con-
venient parts about the
onsite services is that the
results get sent directly to
the physician of the em-
ployees choice.
Roby explained that
employees covered under
Miller’s Textile Services’
medical insurance sim-
ply present their insur-
ance card at the time of
registration. Employees
with insurance elsewhere
also present their card or
Medicare card at registra-
Cridersville man held
on sex abuse charge
From the
Leader-Telegram
EAU CLAIRE, WIS.
HUDSON, Wis. — A
22-year-old Cridersville
man who told police he
drove from Ohio to have
sex with a 15-year-old
New Richmond, Wis.,
boy, says he should not
be punished because the
two are engaged.
Tyler S. Nye of Crid-
ersville is charged in St.
Croix County Court with
a felony count of sexual
assault of a child younger
than 16, which has a max-
imum penalty of 25 years
in prison. He is being held
in jail on a $5,000 cash
bond.
A c -
cording
to court
records:
Ne w
R i c h -
m o n d
p o l i c e
noticed
a car
with fogged-up windows
at a city park at 1:17 a.m.
Saturday, March 1. Of-
fcers found Nye and the
boy naked under a blan-
ket in the cargo area of
the vehicle. Nye initially
told police he was 18 and
the boy was 16.
Auction to aid
baby, family
By BRITTANY POWELL
STAFF WRITER
A quarter auction
benefting a Wapakoneta
family and baby with
medical needs will be
held at 1 p.m. on Sunday,
March 23 at Te Palazzo,
309 South Main St. in
Botkins.
Baby Elizabeth Klop-
fenstein, who has a con-
dition that will require
surgery later this year,
has endured countless
complications and doc-
tor visits. Te auction is
to help support her and
her family’s needs.
Admission to the fun-
draiser is $5. Items for
the auction have been
donated from 31 Taste-
fully Simple, Wildtree
Nelly Cuddles, Creations
by Jill, Olde Hen House,
Lock Two Embroidery,
Pampered Chef, Per-
fectly Posh, Pink Zebra,
among others.
Te auction will start
at 2 p.m. Tose interested
in more information can
contact Amy Swaney at
937-489-7944.
Elizabeth’s story
Tony and Kristi Klop-
fenstein found out they
were having a baby in the
spring of 2013.
Kristi said she and her
family were overjoyed at
the news. Te couple had
already had two daugh-
ters, Erica and Emily.
Te joy was short
lived as complications
in the pregnancy came
early. She was sent in for
blood work to see if she
Partly
Cloudy
Hi 46
Lo 30
DOW JONES NASDAQ CORN SOYBEANS WHEAT
Closing Price / Change
16,222.17 -114.02
Closing Price / Change
4,307.60 0.00
Cash Price / Basis / Futures
4.53 / -0.31 / -3’2
Cash Price / Basis / Futures
14.28 / -0.05 / 2’0
Cash Price / Basis / Futures
6.82 / -0.29 / -4’4
SPORTS, 1B
CHAPMAN HURT
Cincinnati Reds closer Aroldis
Chapman struck in face by ball
ELIZABETH
KLOPFENSTEIN
See ABUSE, Page 5A
See AUCTION, Page 2A
See BUS, Page 5A
State & Local 2A
Records 3A
Opinion 4A
March Madness 7A
Agriculture 8A
Sports 1B
Comics 3B
Classifieds 4B
iindex $ y p y $ Toyota to pay $1.2b settlement
VOLUME 109, ISSUE 67
WASHINGTON (AP) — Toyota
agreed to pay $1.2 billion to settle an
investigation by the U.S. government,
admitting that it hid information about
defects that caused Toyota and Lexus
vehicles to accelerate unexpectedly
and resulted in injuries and deaths.
Attorney General Eric Holder
said Wednesday the penalty is the
largest of its kind ever imposed on
an auto company. The four-year
criminal investigation focused on
whether Toyota promptly reported
the problems related to unintended
acceleration.
The company admitted to
misleading consumers and regulators
by assuring them that it had
adequately addressed an acceleration
problem stemming from ill-ftting foor
mats.
Best
Hometown
OHIO MAGAZINE’S
...AND HOMETOWN OF
ACADEMY - AWARD WINNER
DUDLEY NICHOLS
WAPAKONETA
Staf photo/Michelle Meunier
The James Digital Mammography Services bus sits near the American Flag at Miller’s Textiles.
Nye
SCHOOL SECURITY: Longer response times cited as need for a ‘well-trained’ employee at school; community to be surveyed
See ARMED, Page 5A
state and local
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Thursday, March 20, 2014 2A
The Voice of Auglaize County Since 1905
520 Industrial Drive, Wapakoneta, OH 45895
The Wapakoneta Daily News is open
Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
General business telephone number: ............ (419) 738-2128
Fax number: ....................................................... (419) 738-5352
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publisher@wapakwdn.com
Editor Tom Wehrhahn: ...........................................(419) 739-3515
editor@wapakwdn.com
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jbryars@wapakwdn.com
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circulation@wapakwdn.com
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bshort@wapakwdn.com
Press Supervisor Mark Croy: ..................................... (419) 739-3511
After hours news tips:
Please call (419) 739-3525 and leave a message.
Published Monday-Friday evenings and Saturday morning, except holidays,
by Horizon Ohio Publications Inc. ID No. 665840
The publisher reserves the right to reject,
edit or cancel any advertising at any time without liability.
Yearly subscription rates: Carrier delivery, $126;
Motor Route, $135.20; Mail, $185; News stand, 75 cents
Periodicals Postage Paid, Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Postmaster: Send address changes to
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PRICES COURTESY OF GASBUDDY.COM
Murphy USA Clark Clark Clark Marathon Shell Shell TA Travel Center
3.44 3.43 3.43 3.43 3.44 3.47 3.49 3.65 1281 Bellefontaine St. 302 Willipie St. 109 Defiance St. 803 Apollo Dr. 1003 Defiance St. 102 Defiance St. 1402 Bellefontaine St. 1775 Bellefontaine St.
7-Day
Forecast
courtesy of
meteorologist
Elise Dolinar and the
WLIO weather team
Temperatures will drop back into the mid 40s for our first day of spring, but we’ll at least see some sun as well. Expect breezy conditions today thanks to the cold
front that passed through last night. High pressure sits to our south keeping conditions calm for today, but we will see another area of low pressure move in late
Friday. A warm front will lift through the region ahead of this system bringing in above average temperatures for tomorrow, but there is a slight chance for a mix/
flurries in the morning. A cold front will move through late Friday bringing us a better chance to see some rain showers. Showers will be light with totals around .25”.
Nick Doenges compiles this daily historical column
for the Wapakoneta Daily News.
Looking Back
Through the pages of the
Wapakoneta Daily News
75 years ago, March 20, 1039
Nine cases of scarlet fever were reported at the county health
commissioner’s of ce Monday and today. Tey are: Carl Tinner-
man, 13, son of Mrs. Mary Tinnerman, Noble Township; Max-
ine Macdonald, 14, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Macdonald,
Salem Township; Gene McCarty, 15, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.T.
McCarty, and Harold Rostorfer, 15, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clif
Rostorfer, Clay Township; Virginia Decker, 15, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Decker, Duchouquet Township; Victor Rich-
ardson, 13, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Richardson, Buckland;
Helen Wreede, 13, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Wreede,
Logan Township; Morris Koch, 7, son of Mr. and Mrs. Grover
Koch, Duchouquet Township; and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Holtzap-
ple, whose son is ill.
Several Ohio State students have arrived home for the frst
day of spring, and a week’s vacation from classrooms that were
buzzing with exams last week. Numerous other colleges do not
have their spring session until Easter, while still others have only
the weekends to enjoy. James Shaw and Jacob Boesel have ar-
rived home while Herbert Brackney is expected this afernoon.
Tey are all OSU students. Robert Stulze of Butler College will
arrive here Wednesday morning. Students at Witenberg, Misses
Frances Jacobs, Shirley Arnet, Walton Prueter and Leland Stroh
are not expected until the Easter holidays, together with Helen
Jane Lusk of Ohio Wesleyan, whose vacation begins April 9. Miss
Barbara Brown of Cincinnati Art Academy spent the weekend in
Wapakoneta with her parents, Postmaster and Mrs. AJ Brown.
50 years ago, March 20, 1964
A Milbury truck driver has been charged with having an
oversized load that put approximately 500 telephones in the
St. Johns and Fryburg rural area out of order from 11 a.m. to
11 p.m. yesterday. St. Marys Post, State Highway Patrol, cited
Clarence Reynolds, 34 of Milbury was hauling an oversized
load. Reynolds was southbound on Interstate 75 just north of
the Wapak-Fisher Road at 10:35 a.m. when the large steel tank
he was hauling on a lowboy truck bed caught on the telephone
cables, stretching them and cracking the pole. Te investigating
patrolman said the stretched cables dropped and dangled over
the roadway. Once of the cables caught the front of a truck being
driven south by John van Horn, 24, Jackson Center, damaging
the lower front of the cab. Te cable narrowly missed hiting Van
Horn. Cpl. MT Hobbs, in the area at the time, learned from Van
Horn the type of vehicle Reynolds was driving. Te patrolman
halted Reynolds near Sidney and brought him back to the scene.
Reynolds said he had no knowledge the tank had hit the cables.
Te members and guests of the Parent Faculty Commitee
will be introduced to the modern youths’ opinions in a panel
to be given at their meeting on March 25.the subject to be dis-
cussed will be on the idea of parent and teenage relations. Te
discussion will last about 45 minutes with the panelists being
Philip Snyder, Patrick Byrne, Christine Crawford, Christine
Foltz and Jim Neumeier. Te title of the panel is to be “Pressures
on teenagers at home, school and society.” Neumeier will be the
moderator.
25 years ago, March 20, 1989
Tree Wapakoneta residents are candidates for degrees at
winter quarter commencement for the University of Toledo on
March 25. John Tomas Horman will be receiving an associate
degree of applied science in Civil Engineering. Robert Dean Or-
chard was honored with a high scholarship and will be receiving
an associate degree of applied business in marketing and sales
technology. Kevin Allen Wills will be receiving a bachelor’s de-
gree in engineering technology.
Two Wapakoneta Senior High School students donated the
proceeds of a recent dance contest. Kimberly Numbers and Eric
Miller entered the dance contest at the Lima Mall the frst week-
end of March and won $200 each. Half of the money had to be
donated to a project at the student’s school. Numbers donated
$100 to the French Club, while Miller donated $100 to the ath-
letic department. French Club advisor Deb Fahnestock and Ath-
letic administrator James Staufer got together with the students
to thank them for the donations.
James Dabbelt, manager of Owen Hall Realty Group, recent-
ly announced the addition of Marlene Ballweg to the Wapako-
neta sales staf. Ballweg is a graduate of St. Joseph High School
and Davis College of Business in Toledo. She sold real estate for
a local frm for two plus years. Prior to that she had experience in
the feld of mortgage banking and held her license with a major
frm in California.
Auction From Page 1A
DOWNTOWN
THE FACADE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
of the
DOWNTOWN WAPAKONETA PARTNERSHIP
presents an
Building Owners ~ Business Owners
Breakfast available to purchase from menu
How to Apply for 50% Reimbursement
for your Future Improvements
~Informational Meeting~
SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014 AT 9:00 A.M.
Wapak Eagles Building • 25 E. Auglaize St.
was miscarrying almost as
soon as she found out she
was pregnant.
Afer she found out she
was still pregnant and due
in January, Kristi said she
and Tony were anticipating
the 20-week ultra sound.
“Tony and I went to
that appointment with
thoughts of our baby —
was it going to be a boy
or another beautiful litle
girl?” Kristi said.
Kristi described the mo-
ment they heard they were
having another girl as one
of the best moments of
their lives; however, it was
followed by devastating
news from the ultrasound
technician.
“I grabbed my husband’s
hand even tighter, and I felt
like time was playing out in
slow motion,” Kristi said.
“She proceeded to bring in
my doctor right away, and,
together, they told my hus-
band and I that our litle
girl seemed to have a pos-
sible omphalocele.”
Tis condition involves
internal organs remaining
outside of the abdomen
in a sack. Te doctor also
informed her of possible
fuid on her brain and a
“lemon shaped” head that
can point to spina bifda.
“We lef that day feel-
ing devastated and heart
broken, but we prayed for a
miracle,” Kristi said.
Te couple endured
continuing trips to OSU
for ultra sounds, without
any progress in identifying
a specifc concern.
“Each time we seemed
to get new things to worry
about, and they could nev-
er seem to get a clear shot
of her spine to rule out
spina bifda,” Kristi said.
“I would always see a dif-
ferent doctor there. One
would say not to worry
about her head shape, then
the next time they would
seem concerned. We never
knew what to think when
we would leave our ap-
pointments.”
Kristi said she visited
her regular doctor in Lima
to help guide her in be-
tween the unsetling trips
to OSU.
“By the time my last
ultra sound came in late
December, we knew we
were looking at our litle
girl having omphalocele,”
Kristi said. “We knew we
would be needing to have
her at OSU Medical Cen-
ter. We knew she would be
transported to Nationwide
Children’s Hospital right
away for surgery afer her
birth.
We knew the slight
lemon shape head was still
present but with no ex-
planation. So Tony and I
went into January praying
and being very optimistic
about our sweet litle girl.”
Kristi was induced on
Jan. 17, 2014, and Eliza-
beth was born the next
morning.
“Tere were so many
doctors and specialists in
the delivery room waiting
for her arrival,” Kristi said.
“I only got a glimpse of her
litle face as she was being
handed of for evaluation,
but I knew right away there
was much more wrong
than what Tony and I had
thought.”
When she was fnally
given a short time with
her daughter, doctors ex-
plained the baby’s abnor-
malities, including fused
plates in the skull, the cause
of the lemon shape.
Elizabeth was baptized
and sent to Children’s Hos-
pital that same morning,
and Kristi was told the sur-
gery went well that night.
Describing the next few
days as “a blur,” Kristi said
she was visited by count-
less specialists presenting
future challenges with Eliz-
abeth’s abnormalities.
Meanwhile, Elizabeth
was growing strong in the
hospital, and the doctors
said she was ready to be re-
leased.
“We lef with thinking
we had known all of her
challenges,” Kristi said.
“She had her omphalo-
cele surgery ... She has
VSD, two small holes in
her heart. It will be moni-
tored by a cardiologist
and possibly mean sur-
gery if it doesn’t close.
She has metopic cranio-
See BABY, Page 5A
By MIKE BURKHOLDER
STAFF WRITER
ST. MARYS — Pieces
of the city's past could be
incorporated into new
structures that will serve St.
Marys for years to come.
City Engineer Craig
Moeller said he devel-
oped preliminary plans for
the use of I-beams from
a bridge near the former
power plant that could be
used in a similar fashion for
a pedestrian bridge across
the St. Marys River. Moeller
also examined if the beams
would be worth salvaging.
A possible location for
a pedestrian bridge would
be where approximately 5
acres of city-owned land
near Varsity Lanes ap-
proaches the river. A local
Scout built a walking path
through the woods as part
of an Eagle Scout project
several years ago.
"It's not to say we
couldn't use the bridge else-
where," Moeller said. "We
could, but that's one area
we have talked about that
we could get connected."
Te city has plans to
build a walking path around
K.C. Geiger Park this year.
Moeller said any future
bridge near the woods
could tie in with the walk-
ing path, giving connectiv-
ity between K.C. Geiger
and the woods.
St. Marys eyes reuse for bridge parts
Agenda Lottery
Here are the
OHIO LOTTERY
selections for
Wednesday:
Mega Millions 3/18
11-19-24-33-51
Mega Ball: 7
Powerball 3/19
2-19-23-34-43
Powerball: 14
Pick 3 Numbers 3/19
5-7-9 (day)
3-8-5 (night)
Pick 4 Numbers 3/19
1-4-1-5 (day)
3-0-2-3 (night)
Pick 5 Numbers 3/19
6-7-5-7-2 (day)
7-8-8-8-6 (night)
Rolling Cash 5 3/19
14-23-25-28-31
Classic Lotto 3/19
2-6-8-13-24-45
Kicker: 133364
Mega Millions jackpot
$15 million
Powerball jackpot
$96 million
Rolling Cash 5 jackpot
$120,000
Classic Lotto jackpot
$64.1 million
In brief
DAYTON — Skydiving cadets
and instructors from the U.S. Air
Force Academy will help open
the Vectren Dayton Air Show
Presented by Kroger on June
28-29 at Dayton International
Airport.
The academy’s Wings of
Blue, the U.S. Air Force Skydiving
Team, will descend with the U.S.
fag during the singing of the
national anthem in the opening
ceremonies. The team will also
perform a high-energy, preci-
sion parachuting demonstration
each day, joining the U.S. Navy
Blue Angels and a U.S. Marine
Corps AV-8B Harrier “Jump Jet”
as featured military performers
in the 40th consecutive annual
air show at Dayton International.
Wings of Blue’s cadet
and staf members perform
around the world, making
roughly 19,000 jumps per year
for instruction and training.
They demonstrate high-speed
maneuvers in freefall as well as
precision canopy fight at every
home Air Force football game,
airshows across the country and
other high profle venues.
Ticket prices remain un-
changed from 2013. The popular
Chairman’s Club, Pavilion, Family
4 Pack, and Blue Sky Chalet are
now on sale, ofering a range
of seating amenities. Tickets
can conveniently be purchased
through our show website at
www.daytonairshow.com.
Beginning May 19, 2014, deep
discount general admission
tickets will also be on sale at
more than 100 Kroger stores in
the Dayton-Cincinnati region.
The Auglaize County Board
of Elections Of ce will be closed
Wednesday, March 26, to attend
a Regional Training Meeting. The
of ce will reopen on Thursday,
March 27, for regular business
hours.
records
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Thursday, March 20, 2014 3A
Obituaries Death Notices
James R. Steining, 55 Anita M. Bosau, 72
First National Financial
& Investment Services
AARON J. ROHRBAUGH – LPL FINANCIAL ADVISOR
Wapakoneta Ofhce 419-738-2194
LOCATED AT FIRST NATIONAL BANK
New Bremen Ofhce 419-629-2761
FINANCIAL SERVICES OFFERED
Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC.
Insurance products offered through LPL Financial or its licensed
affiliates.
Not FDIC Insured Not Bank Guaranteed
May Lose Value
Not a Deposit
Not Insured by any Federal Government Agency
510CK5 - B0Nß5 - MU1UAL FUNß5
RETIREMENT PLANNING - PERSONAL & BUSINESS
L0N6 1£RM CAR£ PLANNIN6 - LIF£ IN5URANC£
FRIDAY
March 21st
4:30-7:00
Carry Out at
Drive Thru Window $7.00
ALL YOU CARE TO EAT
INSIDE
ADULT
$8.00
CHILD
$4.00
12 & under
(under 6 eat FREE)
FISH FRY
614 Co. Rd. 25A • Wapakoneta
PUBLIC INVITED
Any pkg. of
Oreck
Vacuum Bags
LIMA SEWING CENTER
2100 Harding Hwy., Lima (Next to Harbor Freight)
419-228-8200 Mon-Fr 10-5:30; Sat 10-2
$
5
00
OFF
Expires 04-06-13
March 20: The Auglaize
County Board of Education is
scheduled to meet at 7 p.m.
in the Auglaize County Edu-
cational Service Center, 1045
Dearbaugh St.
• The Auglaize County Vet-
erans Service Commission
will hold its regular board
meeting at 5 p.m., followed
by its annual dinner at 6 p.m.
at Par Five Restaurant, Wapa-
koneta.
March 24: The Waynes-
feld Village Council is sched-
uled to meet at 7:30 p.m. in
the village of ce at 300 N.
Westminster St.
March 25: The Wapako-
neta Board of Education will
meet at 7 p.m. at Wapakone-
ta Elementary School
• The Botkins Village
Council is scheduled to meet
at 7 p.m. in its council cham-
bers, 111 E. Lynn St., Botkins.
• The Botkins Village
Council Finance Committee
is scheduled to meet imme-
diately following the village
council meeting in its coun-
cil chambers, 111 E. Lynn St.,
Botkins.
• The Botkins Village
Council Safety Committee is
scheduled to meet at 6 p.m.
in its council chambers, 111
E. Lynn St., Botkins.
April 1: The Duchouquet
Township Trustees are sched-
uled to meet at 8 p.m. in the
Duchoquet Township house.
• The Logan Township
Trustees are scheduled to
meet at 8 p.m. in the Logan
Township house.
• The Botkins Village
Council Service Committee is
scheduled to meet at 7 p.m.
in council chambers, 111 E.
Lynn St., Botkins.
• The Pusheta Township
Board of Trustees meets at 7
p.m. at the township house
in Freyburg.
April 2: The Auglaize Soil
and Water Conservation Dis-
trict Board of Supervisors is
scheduled to meet at 8 a.m.
at the of ce on Industrial
Drive.
• The Local Emergency
Planning Committee is
scheduled to meet at 10 a.m.
• The Wapakoneta Area
Economic Development
Committee is scheduled to
meet at 11:30 a.m. in the
Chamber of Commerce of-
fce, 30 E. Auglaize St.
• The Botkins Joint Rec-
reational Board meets at 7
p.m. in council chambers,
111 E. Lynn St., Botkins.
April 3: The Wapakoneta
Tree Commission is sched-
uled to meet at 4 p.m. at the
Wapakoneta City Adminis-
tration Building, 701 Parlette
Court.
• The Clay Township trust-
ees are scheduled to meet at
8 p.m. at the Clay Township
House in Gutman.
April 7: The Wapakoneta
City Council is scheduled
to meet at 7:30 p.m. at the
Wapakoneta City Adminis-
tration Building, 701 Parlette
Court.
• The Salem Township
Board of Trustees meets at 8
p.m. in the township build-
ing in Kossuth.
James R. Steining, 55,
of Mountain Top, Pa.,
formerly of Wapakoneta,
died at
1 : 1 5
p . m . ,
Tu e s -
d a y ,
Ma r c h
1 8 ,
2014, at
his resi-
d e n c e .
He was
b o r n
A p r i l
6, 1958, in Lima, the son
of Henry B. and Jane F.
(Kohler) Steining. His
parents survive in Wapa-
koneta.
Other survivors in-
clude, three children, An-
gela D. (Ryan) Sample,
of Indianapolis, Ind.,
Cristine A. (Michael)
Shaw, of Delphos, An-
drew J. (fancée Gabri-
ella Perdmo) Steining, of
Camp Lejeune, N.C.; a
grandson, Landon James
Sample; siblings, Stephen
W. (Gail) Steining, of
Burnsville, Minn., Patricia
J. Steining, of Jacksonville,
Fla., Henry B. (Sally)
Steining, Jr., of Canton, Jo-
seph M. (Michele) Stein-
ing, of Colleyville, Texas;
12 nieces and nephews,
and six great-nieces and
great-nephews.
Jim worked as a district
manager at Vector Securi-
ty Co., Mountian Top, for
15 years. A 1976 gradu-
ate of Wapakoneta Senior
High School, he served
with the combat engi-
neers in the U.S. Army
in Germany. He was a
member of the St. Jude
Catholic Church, and the
Knights of Columbus,
both of Mountain Top.
He enjoyed hunting and
target shooting.
Mass of Christian
Burial will be at 10:30 a.m.,
Monday, March 24, 2014,
at St. Joseph Catholic
Church, Wapakoneta,
with Rev. Daniel Hunt
of ciating. Te family will
receive friends from 2-4
and 6-8 p.m., Sunday, at
the Baylif & Eley Funeral
Home, state route 501,
Wapakoneta. Memorial
contributions may be
directed to the American
Red Cross. Condolences
may be expressed at
baylifandeleyf.com.
James R. “Jim” Donart, 71
James R. "Jim" Donart,
71, of Albuquerque, N.M.,
went to be with the Lord
Sunda y,
March 16,
2014. Jim
was born
in Lima,
O h i o
to Wilfred and Doris
Donart.
He was a graduate of
Bowling Green State Uni-
versity. Jim entered the
U.S. Air Force, where he
honorably served for 21
years. Afer retirement, he
taught science for more
than 20 years in the Rio
Rancho Public Schools.
Jim was a long-time mem-
ber of Sagebrush Com-
munity Church where he
served in multiple minis-
tries. His greatest joys in
life were God and family.
He is survived by Mari-
lyn, his beloved wife of
46 years; children, Genny
Donart, Elizabeth Gar-
ciasalas and husband,
Freddy, and Nathan Don-
art; grandchildren, Anna
and husband, Jaime, Alex,
Alyssa, Sydney, Riley and
Megan; siblings, Mike
and wife, Barb, Rose and
Don and wife, Anne.
A memorial service
with full military hon-
ors will be held Saturday,
March 22, 2014, 9:30
a.m., at Sagebrush Com-
munity Church, River-
side Campus, 6440 Coors
Blvd. NW. Interment of
cremated remains will be
at Santa Fe National Cem-
etery at a later date.
Please visit the on-
line guestbook for Jim
at FrenchFunerals.
com,  FRENCH - West-
side 9300 Golf Course
Road, NW, 505-897-
0300.
Anita M. Bosau, 72, of
Wapakoneta, died at 4:45
p.m., Wednesday, March
19, 2014, at her residence. 
Arrangements are in-
complete at Schlosser Fu-
neral Home & Cremation
Services, Wapakoneta.
Thomas A. Smith, 90
Tomas A. Smith,
90, of Wapakoneta, died
Wednesday, March 19,
2104, in the emergency
department of JTDM
Hospital in St. Marys.
Arrangements are be-
ing completed with the
Miller-Long & Folk Fu-
neral Home (314 W.
High Street Chapel) in St.
Marys.
Half of US adults
40 to 75 eligible
for statin drugs
Almost half of
Americans ages 40 to 75
and nearly all men over
60 qualify to consider
chol esterol - l ower i ng
statin drugs under new
heart disease prevention
guidelines, an analysis
concludes.
It's the frst indepen-
dent look at the impact
of the guidelines issued
in November and shows
how dramatically they
shif more people toward
treatment. Supporters say
they reveal the true scope
of heart risks in Ameri-
ca. Critics have said the
guidelines overreach by
suggesting medications
such as Zocor and Lipitor
for such a broad swath of
the population.
"We wanted to be
really objective and
just quantify what the
guidelines do, and not get
into a discussion about
whether they are correct,"
said Michael Pencina,
the Duke University
biostatistician who led the
analysis. It was published
online Wednesday by the
New England Journal of
Medicine.
Under the new guide-
lines, 56 million Ameri-
cans ages 40 to 75 are eli-
gible to consider a statin;
43 million were under the
old advice. Both numbers
include 25 million people
taking statins now.
"Tat is striking ...
eye-opening," Dr. Daniel
Rader of the University of
Pennsylvania said of the
new estimate.
Winter’s snowy
barrage hammers
US road budgets
TRVERSE CITY,
Mich. (AP) — In Michi-
gan's way-up-north Ke-
weenaw Peninsula, where
200 inches of snow in a
single season elicits bare-
ly a shrug, of cials know
there's nothing in the
budget more important
than keeping the roads
passable.
Yet even they have
been caught short this
merciless winter. Hough-
ton County planned to
spend around $2.1 mil-
lion for plowing, salting
and related maintenance,
which experience sug-
gested would be plenty,
but has overshot it by
$500,000 and counting.
State and local govern-
ments across a huge swath
of the nation, from the
Great Plains to the Upper
Midwest and the Deep
South to New England,
are experiencing sticker
shock afer one of the
coldest, snowiest, iciest
winters in memory. Many
have spent two or three
times as much as they
budgeted for clearing
roads. More bad weather
could send costs higher.
Even as Tursday's of -
cial arrival of spring pres-
ages warmer weather, it's
clear that winter's biter
afertaste will linger much
longer as of cials compen-
sate for untold millions in
unexpected spending that
includes patching a rash
of potholes.
In some states, legisla-
tures are already prepar-
ing emergency appropria-
tions. Elsewhere, road
agencies are delaying re-
paving projects, cuting
back on roadside mowing
and summer hires, dip-
ping into rainy-day funds
and making do with bat-
tered equipment instead
of buying more.
"It'll have a consider-
able impact on cities and
their fscal health," said
James Brooks of the Na-
tional League of Cities.
"Just as they're emerging
from the depths of the
great recession, they got
whacked very hard by this
intemperate winter."
Its sheer ferocity
caught nearly everyone
by surprise, including
those for whom dealing
with cold and snow is sec-
ond nature.
"Tis is a very unique
winter, even talking with
some of the old tim-
ers who have been here
longer than I have," said
Houghton County high-
way engineer Kevin Har-
ju, a resident of the Lake
Superior community
since 1976. "You can get a
lot of snow or you can get
extremely low tempera-
tures, but not both — ex-
cept this year."
Virginia budgeted
$157 million for snow re-
moval and may exceed it
by $150 million — prob-
ably the most the state
has ever spent for the pur-
pose. "Te bills are still
coming in," spokeswom-
an Tamara Rollinson said.
Montgomery County,
Md., in the Washington,
D.C., suburbs, has spent
three times its budgeted
amount. Illinois is 200
percent over its three-
year average, and its crews
have spread almost dou-
ble the usual volume of
salt — a mixed blessing,
since it corrodes roads
and bridges as it melts
the snow. North Carolina
planned for $40 million
and has spent $62 mil-
lion. Arkansas, where ice
is ofen a bigger problem
than snow, has spent a
record $18 million, three
times its seasonal average.
Ernie Winters, high-
way commissioner in
Winnebago County,
Wis., thought things were
tough in 2013 when his
department blew through
its winter maintenance
budget by April. But now
he's over budget again —
by an even bigger margin.
"Last winter was a
peach compared to this
one," he lamented.
Of cials are scram-
bling to make up for the
massive cost overruns.
Atlanta, pummeled by
ice storms that created
epic traf c jams, is dip-
ping into a rainy-day fund
to cover $13.5 million in
cleanup costs.
In Michigan, Mas-
sachusets and Pennsyl-
vania, legislators have
approved special appro-
priations that will help but
won't pay for everything.
Today in History
opinion
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Thursday, March 20, 2014 4A
Publisher: Deb Zwez Managing Editor: Tom Wehrhahn
SATs don’t always mark
a successful path
I
just experienced the thrill of be-
ing invited back to the campus
of my alma mater to speak to
undergraduate students. Te invita-
tion came a few months ago from Jack
Lule, the chair of journalism and com-
munication at Lehigh University, from
which I graduated in 1984. Tat some-
one in Lule’s position would think
students could beneft from listening
to me for an hour gave me a measure
of achievement and acceptance.
And I get why I was invited: Te
combination of my professional
activities since graduation, includ-
ing writing for
Te Philadel-
phia Inquirer,
hosting a daily
radio program
nationwide on
SiriusXM, writ-
ing fve books
with a novel on
the way, and
now hosting a
Saturday morn-
ing program on CNN.
Tere’s just one problem: Accord-
ing to my SATs, I was never Lehigh
material.
Here are the bare facts. At Holicong
Junior High School, and thereafer at
Central Bucks West High School, I
was a “sometimes” honor roll student.
My grades were mostly B’s with an
infrequent A and an occasional C,
frankly, more of the later than the
former. In a scrapbook somewhere
I’ve got a few clippings from the Intel-
ligencer listing the most recent honor
roll with my name mentioned.
My public school record included
some other atributes — sports
participation, a few class presidencies,
a stint as newspaper editor — and
some liabilities — such as when I was
disciplined for selling fake IDs to class-
mates. What can I say? I was always
entrepreneurial, the kid who sold you
Christmas cards and came to shovel
your drive. Sometimes that ambi-
tion got me in trouble. Such as when
Coach Carey demanded I stop an
NFL beting pool out of homeroom,
or when I got thrown in a police van
at the Spectrum for selling Genesis
bumper stickers in my senior year.
(Tey cost me a nickel to print, and I
sold them for a buck.)
My SATs were never commensurate
with my respectable school grades.
And it was no one-of. I took the test
several times and never bated above
the Mendoza line.
Nine-ninety. I still hate seeing it
numerically represented: 990. I never
even broke 1,000.
Lucky for me that my father
received his master’s from Lehigh
and my brother was president of his
Lehigh class the year I was applying.
Otherwise, I’m sure my SATs would
have sunk my application.
Driving back to Bethlehem, Pa., I
felt like George Bailey on the bridge
toward the end of “It’s a Wonderful
Life, when an angel shows the Jimmy
Stewart character an alternative path.
Bailey’s angel was named Clarence.
Mine was Samuel Missimer, then
Lehigh’s dean of admissions, who ad-
mited me despite my mediocre SATs.
What if my college acceptance had
been determined by that test?
A rejection would have meant
I’d have never met a faculty mentor
named Dave Amidon, who sparked
in me an academic fre I never knew
existed. Missing from the Lehigh
campus in the fall of 1980, I would
not have met “Ambassador” George
H.W. Bush when he toured Bethlehem
Steel, an event that led to my working
for Vice President Bush and a string
of extraordinary political experiences,
which in turn caused media outlets to
solicit my commentary. No Lehigh?
No Amidon. No Amidon? No double
major and no Phi Beta Kappa. No Phi
Beta Kappa, no admission to Penn
Law.
Te intervening years haven’t
sofened my antipathy toward the
SAT, not even the recent experience
of a son who aced it. I’m encouraged
that the College Board is atempting
to change the nature of the exam in
a way that will recognize evidence-
based thinking that students should
be gleaning in high school. Perhaps
if I’d had an exam like the board now
contemplates, I’d have scored more
respectably. But maybe not. Beter for
students, parents, and colleges to scrap
it altogether.
Today, out of roughly 2,800 four-
year U.S. colleges and universities,
about 850 make SAT or ACT submis-
sions optional. A recent study by two
former colleagues at Bates College,
William Hiss, the former dean of ad-
missions, and Valerie Wilson Franks,
the study’s lead investigator, found
that there is a negligible diference
between the performance of students
who submit test results and those who
do not.
Te study, “Defning Promise:
Optional Standardized Testing Poli-
cies in American College and Univer-
sity Admissions,” looked at 123,000
student and alumni records. It found
only a 0.05 diferential between the
GPAs of those applicants who submit-
ted a standardized test score and those
who did not — and graduation rates
for submiters were only 0.6 percent
higher than those of non-submiters.
In other words, trivial diferences.
When I shared my personal experi-
ence with Hiss, he told me by e-mail
that the disconnect between my SAT
scores and later academic and career
success is “strikingly common.”
“In our one study, there were tens
of thousands of students whom any
statistician would call ‘false negatives.’
Tat is, these students’ SAT scores
suggest they could not do strong
work in college, when in fact they can.
Simply put, our country cannot aford
to throw away up to 30 percent of its
talent.”
— Michael Smerconish
writes for
the Philadelphia Inquirer.
Los Angeles Times editorial
Who should run
the Internet?
Rob Portman
U.S. Senator
B40D Dirksen Senate
Office Building
Washington, D.C., 20510
(202) 224-3353
Sherrod Brown
U.S. Senator
455 Russell Senate
Washington, D.C., 20510
(202) 224-2315
Jim Jordan
4th District Congressman
1524 Longworth House
Washington, D.C., 20515
(202) 225-2676
Lima office:
3121 E. Elm Plaza,
Lima, OH 45805
(419) 999-6455 (phone)
(419) 999-4238 (fax)
John Boehner
8th District Congressman
5617 Liberty Fairfield Rd.
West Chester, 45011
(513) 870-0300
House Office Building
Washington, D.C., 20515
(202) 224-3121
Write your legislators
Thought for the day
“Spring makes everything
young again except man.”
— Jean Paul Richter,
German author
(1763-1825)
Freedom of Speech: Reader Opinions and Other Views
O
ne of the technological marvels
of the Internet is that it acts as
a unifed system, despite the
fact that it’s a global collection of disparate
computer and communications networks.
Tat’s thanks in part to the use of a com-
mon address book administered by a non-
proft organization created and overseen
by the U.S. government.
Now, the Obama administration says
the time has come to remove Washington’s
oversight, leaving the U.S. government
with no greater infuence over how the In-
ternet operates than any other country has.
Tat’s a risky step, yet one that seems un-
avoidable. And if the transition is handled
the right way, it may actually reduce the
risk that governments will impose rules
that Balkanize the Net.
Te federal involvement in the Web’s
address book, formally known as the
Domain Name System, is a holdover from
days when the Internet was just a federal
research project. Although independent
engineering groups came up with the stan-
dards that enable networks to interconnect
and data to be shared, federal contractors
were in charge of maintaining the list of the
names and corresponding Internet Proto-
col addresses of all the computers that con-
nected online. Tat system, shared by users
around the world, functions as a road map
that guides email, Web browsers and other
Internet traf c to the right destination.
In 1998, however, the federal govern-
ment started shifing oversight of the
Domain Name System to the private
sector, contracting with the newly created
Internet Corporation for Assigned Names
and Numbers to manage domains and
IP addresses. ICANN isn’t controlled by
Washington or any other single entity;
instead, it has a board of directors chosen
by its constituents, which include tele-
communications companies, engineering
groups and governments. Yet the fact that
ICANN is a U.S. government contractor
has led many observers to assume that
Washington has, if not veto power, at least
an unusual degree of infuence over the
organization.
Tat maters because some foreign
governments want a very diferent Inter-
net from the free, open and global one we
have today. Some, such as China, long to
(and, to some extent, do) censor the traf c
coming in and out of their countries. And
in the wake of Edward Snowden’s revela-
tions about National Security Agency
surveillance around the globe, some, such
as Brazil, want to force websites to store all
the data they collect within their borders,
efectively creating local duplicates of the
World Wide Web.
So when the administration announced
last week that it planned to fnish privatiz-
ing the management of Internet names and
addresses, some proponents of Internet
freedom were outraged. Rob Atkinson,
president of the Information Technology
and Innovation Foundation, said the ad-
ministration was “giving up its traditional
‘bodyguard’ role of Internet governance.”
Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich
warned that the move “risks foreign dicta-
torships defning the Internet.”
Tose concerns would be more realistic
if the U.S. could dictate ICANN’s every
move, but it can’t. Still, the federal govern-
ment’s involvement has protected ICANN
from being subjected to some other gov-
ernment or governments’ rule. And given
that a United Nations agency recently tried
to impose its own version of governance
on the Internet, it’s not far-fetched to think
that opponents of a unifed, free and open
Internet will see the administration’s pro-
posed retreat as an opportunity to advance.
To its credit, the administration placed
some important conditions on its with-
drawal. It plans to cede its authority to “the
global multistakeholder community” — in
other words, the academics, engineers,
businesses, consumers and governments
that have a stake in the Internet — when
its current deal with ICANN expires in
September 2015. And while it handed
ICANN the job of coming up with a
replacement for the current system, it said
it will not accept “a government-led or an
inter-governmental organization solution.”
Te Internet is so important to the glob-
al economy that even the United States’
allies have been pressing Washington to
give up control. Te leaks about the NSA’s
activities only amplifed those calls. If the
rest of the world can’t trust the U.S. to keep
its hands of, the best hope for preserv-
ing the Internet as we know it is to make
sure no governments are in charge. Te
administration took a step in that direction,
although no destination is yet in sight.
In Young’s Opinion...
Perhaps what we need
is not more feminism or
more men’s-rights activism,
but a gender-equality
movement that promotes
fairness for both sexes.
Today is Thursday, March 20, the 79th
day of 2014. There are 286 days left in the
year. Spring arrives at 12:57 p.m. EDT.
TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY:
On March 20, 1852, Harriet Beecher
Stowe’s influential novel about slavery, “Uncle
Tom’s Cabin,” was first published in book
form after being serialized.
ON THIS DATE:
In 1727, physicist, mathematician and
astronomer Sir Isaac Newton died in London.
In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte returned to
Paris after escaping his exile on Elba, begin-
ning his “Hundred Days” rule.
In 1922, the decommissioned USS Jupiter,
converted into the first U.S. Navy aircraft
carrier, was recommissioned as the USS
Langley.
In 1933, the state of Florida electrocuted
Giuseppe Zangara for shooting to death
Chicago Mayor Anton J. Cermak at a Miami
event attended by President-elect Franklin D.
Roosevelt, the presumed target, the previous
February.
In 1952, the U.S. Senate ratified, 66-10,
the Treaty of Peace with Japan.
In 1964, Irish poet, author and playwright
Brendan Behan, 41, died in Dublin.
In 1969, John Lennon married Yoko Ono
in Gibraltar.
In 1974, Britain’s Princess Anne was the
target of a kidnapping attempt near Bucking-
ham Palace; the would-be abductor, Ian Ball,
was captured. Former NBC News anchorman
Chet Huntley, 62, died at his Montana home.
In 1985, Libby Riddles of Teller, Alaska,
became the first woman to win the Iditarod
Trail Dog Sled Race.
In 1994, El Salvador held its first presiden-
tial election following the country’s 12-year-
old civil war. (Armando Calderon Sol of the
ARENA party led the vote, but needed to win a
run-off to achieve the presidency.)
In 1995, in Tokyo, 12 people were killed,
more than 5,500 others sickened when pack-
ages containing the poisonous gas sarin were
leaked on five separate subway trains by Aum
Shinrikyo cult members.
In 1999, Bertrand Piccard of Switzerland
and Brian Jones of Britain became the first
aviators to fly a hot-air balloon around the
world nonstop as they floated over Mauritania
past longitude 9 degrees west. (They landed
safely in Egypt the next day.)
Ten years ago: Hundreds of thousands of
people worldwide rallied against the U.S.-led
war in Iraq on the first anniversary of the
start of the conflict. The U.S. military charged
six soldiers with abusing inmates at the Abu
Ghraib prison. The Rev. Karen Dammann,
a lesbian Methodist pastor, was acquitted
of violating church doctrine in a trial held in
Bothell, Wash. Taiwanese President Chen
Shui-bian (jehn shwee bee-ehn) narrowly won
re-election a day after being shot in an assas-
sination attempt. Former Dutch Queen Juliana
died at age 94.
Five years ago: President Barack Obama
reached out to the Iranian people in a video
with Farsi subtitles, saying the U.S. was
prepared to end years of strained relations
if Tehran toned down its bellicose rhetoric;
Iranian officials dismissed the overture,
saying they wanted concrete change from
Washington before they were ready to enter a
dialogue. Pope Benedict XVI, visiting Angola,
condemned sexual violence against women
in Africa and chided those countries on the
continent that approved abortion.
One year ago: Making his first visit to
Israel since taking office, President Barack
Obama affirmed Israel’s sovereign right to
defend itself from any threat and vowed to
prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons.
Five former elected officials of Bell, Calif.,
were convicted of misappropriating public
funds by paying themselves huge salaries
while raising taxes on residents; one de-
fendant was acquitted. Colorado Gov. John
Hickenlooper signed bills that put sweeping
new restrictions on sales of firearms and am-
munition. Rise Stevens, 99, a mezzo-soprano
who sang with the Metropolitan Opera for
more than 20 years spanning the 1940s and
1950s, died in New York.
Today’s Birthdays: Singer Dame Vera
Lynn is 97. Producer-director-comedian Carl
Reiner is 92. Actor Hal Linden is 83. Former
Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney is
75. Country singer Don Edwards is 75. TV
producer Paul Junger Witt is 71. Country
singer-musician Ranger Doug (Riders in the
Sky) is 68. Hockey Hall-of-Famer Bobby Orr
is 66. Blues singer-musician Marcia Ball is 65.
Actor William Hurt is 64. Rock musician Carl
Palmer (Emerson, Lake and Palmer) is 64.
Rock musician Jimmie Vaughan is 63. Coun-
try musician Jimmy Seales (Shenandoah) is
60. Actress Amy Aquino is 57. Movie director
Spike Lee is 57. Actress Theresa Russell is
57. Actress Vanessa Bell Calloway is 57. Ac-
tress Holly Hunter is 56. Rock musician Slim
Jim Phantom (The Stray Cats) is 53. Actress-
model-designer Kathy Ireland is 51. Actor
David Thewlis is 51. Rock musician Adrian
Oxaal (James) is 49. Actress Jessica Lundy is
48. Actress Liza Snyder is 46. Actor Michael
Rapaport is 44. Actor Alexander Chaplin is 43.
Rock singer Chester Bennington (Linkin Park)
is 38. Actor Michael Genadry is 36. Actress
Bianca Lawson is 35. Rock musician Nick
Wheeler (The All-American Rejects) is 32.
Actor Michael Cassidy is 31. Actress-singer
Christy Carlson Romano is 30.
Michael
Smerconish
of cer, also known as a
peace of cer, which is a
person typically employed
by the local police depart-
ment who provides secu-
rity and crime prevention
in schools. Tere are also
18 states that allow adults
to carry frearms on cam-
pus, assuming they have a
concealed-carry license or
some other writen per-
mission to do so, according
to a report by NBC News
in January 2013.
Te training that a W-G
employee would have to
go through in order to be
allowed to carry a gun on
school grounds has not
yet been defned, although
Pfster said it would be
much more in depth than
ataining a concealed-carry
permit.
If this security measure
is adopted at W-G, the
employee or employees
responsible for carrying a
frearm would have to go
through training similar to
that of a school resource
of cer.
W-G Secondary Princi-
pal T.J. Winkler, who has
already received a form of
gun training through the
Shelby County Sherif’s
Of ce, said that the per-
son responsible for carry-
ing a gun would likely go
through continuous train-
ing.
“From talking to
(Waynesfeld Police) Chief
Nathan Moter, there
would probably be on-
going training in that area,
although nothing is of cial
yet” he said at Tuesday’s
meeting. “It’s not going to
be a one-size-fts-all type of
training.”
According to Pfster,
there are schools in Shelby
County that currently al-
low for certain employees
to carry frearms.
“In Shelby County, they
have put diferent school
employees through long-
term training so that they
really knew what to do and
how to coordinate with law
enforcement,” Pfster said
afer a school board meet-
ing on March 10. “Tere
are a number of schools
working with the sherif
who are currently doing
that.”
In fact, the entire W-G
faculty and staf received
training from Auglaize
County Sherif Allen Sol-
omon and a team of 20
of cers last Friday that
dealt with scenarios based
on what they would do
if there was a shooter on
campus.
Winkler and Chief
Moter are both certifed
ALICE (Alert Lockdown
Inform Counter Evacu-
ate) Training Institute in-
structors, which provides
strategic training to school
employees on how to re-
spond to armed intruders.
Winkler said he utilized
bits and pieces of what he
learned at the institute in
the training exercise last
Friday.
During the training,
W-G employees participat-
ed in hands-on scenarios
that included identifying
good and bad guys, and
working to increase com-
munication, self-defense
and barricading skills in the
event of a school shooting.
Tey were also given sta-
tistics about school shoot-
ings, specifcally dealing
with police response time.
According the the AL-
ICE website, the national
law enforcement response
time to aggravated assaults
is 20.9 percent of time
within fve minutes, 32.6
percent of time between
six and 10 minutes and
36.4 percent of time more
than 11 minutes.
Pfster said another
thing he learned at the
training was that most
school shootings are re-
solved by a staf member
addressing the situation,
or the shooter commiting
suicide, as opposed to in-
tervention by law enforce-
ment.
For Pfster, police re-
sponse time is the biggest
reason why he is in favor
of allowing an employee
to carry a gun on school
grounds.
“Te reason we need to
look at this is because we’re
prety far out here (in the
county),” he said. “If Chief
Moter is of that day or if
he’s working nights while
we’re in session, it’s gonna
take the Auglaize County
Sherif at least 15 minutes
to get here.
“All the statistics show
that a huge amount of
damage can be done in just
a few minutes, so if you
had someone on campus
who was well-trained that
could respond immedi-
ately—that’s something
we’re looking at and want
to know how the commu-
nity feels about that.”
Waynesfeld Village
does not have a full-time
police of cer on duty dur-
ing the school day, and be-
ing on the east side of the
county, it is farther away
from the Auglaize County
Sherif’s of ce than many
other districts.
“If Chief Moter is not
on duty and we are solely
waiting on the response
from the Auglaize County
Sherif — and I’m not
knocking them at all—but
we’re not nearly as close as
some of the other school
districts in Auglaize Coun-
ty,” Winkler said.
During Tuesday’s meet-
ing, parent advisory mem-
ber Natasha Kaufman said
she was initially skeptical
of the idea, but is starting
to change her mind based
on what was said at the
meeting.
“I think people need to
hear those statistics,” she
said. “We need to get past
the fear of having an armed
person in the building, to
saying that we could save a
lot of lives if we had some-
one who is trained and
could react like that.”
Kaufman went on to say
that she thinks the survey
should explain in explicit
detail what the trained em-
ployee would have to go
through so that parents can
make the most informed
decision as possible.
Te method in which
the survey will be conduct-
ed is still being discussed,
but Pfster said they may
utilize the school’s emer-
gency communication
system to send the mes-
sage directly to parents
and community members
through their cell phones.
Other options that may be
explored are using an elec-
tronic survey that would be
conducted through the dis-
trict’s website, or puting
the question out through
“Tiger Talk,” the district’s
newsleter.
Pfster said the survey
will be released to the com-
munity within the next 10
to 14 days.
Stock Name Code Price Change/Percentage
UBS AG UBS ETC(UBS BBG... INDU 959.44 +74.60 (8.43%)
Hewlett-Packard Company HPQ 31.62 +1.06 (3.47%)
CVS Caremark Corporation CVS 73.51 -0.18 (-0.24%)
Applied Materials, Inc. AMAT 19.47 +0.10 (0.52%)
AT&T Inc. T 32.96 -0.02 (-0.06%)
General Motors Company GM 34.91 -0.26 (-0.74%)
Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. BBBY 67.89 -0.42 (-0.61%)
Bob Evans Farms Inc BOBE 50.00 +0.77 (1.56%)
BP plc (ADR) BP 47.32 -0.24 (-0.50%)
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co BMY 54.74 +0.01 (0.02%)
Cisco Systems, Inc. CSCO 21.63 0.00 (0.00%)
Citigroup Inc C 48.94 +0.80 (1.66%)
E I Du Pont De Nemours... DD 66.07 -0.73 (-1.09%)
Duke Energy Corp DUK 68.71 -1.53 (-2.18%)
EMC Corporation EMC 27.58 -0.26 (-0.93%)
Emerson Electric Co. EMR 63.63 -0.24 (-0.38%)
Exxon Mobil Corporation XOM 93.73 -0.98 (-1.03%)
Fifth Third Bancorp FITB 22.83 +0.05 (0.22%)
Ford Motor Company F 15.48 -0.01 (-0.06%)
General Electric Company GE 25.28 -0.37 (-1.44%)
The Goodyear Tire &... GT 27.31 -0.39 (-1.41%)
Health Care REIT, Inc. HCN 57.18 -1.21 (-2.07%)
The Home Depot, Inc. HD 79.75 -0.07 (-0.09%)
Honda Motor Co Ltd (ADR) HMC 35.20 -0.16 (-0.45%)
Huntington Bancshares... HBAN 9.80 +0.05 (0.51%)
Intel Corporation INTC 25.02 +0.20 (0.81%)
Johnson & Johnson JNJ 93.59 -0.35 (-0.37%)
JPMorgan Chase & Co. JPM 58.30 +0.24 (0.41%)
Lancaster Colony Corp. LANC 96.71 -0.93 (-0.96%)
Lowe’s Companies, Inc. LOW 49.58 -0.25 (-0.50%)
McDonald’s Corporation MCD 96.10 -1.21 (-1.24%)
Merck & Co., Inc. MRK 55.99 -0.37 (-0.66%)
Microsoft Corporation MSFT 39.27 -0.28 (-0.71%)
Motorola Solutions Inc MSI 65.70 -0.02 (-0.03%)
Nokia Corporation (ADR) NOK 7.54 -0.13 (-1.69%)
Oracle Corporation ORCL 38.55 -0.29 (-0.75%)
Parker-Hannifin... PH 119.66 -0.22 (-0.18%)
PepsiCo, Inc. PEP 81.37 -0.58 (-0.71%)
Pfizer Inc. PFE 31.71 -0.22 (-0.69%)
The Procter & Gamble... PG 78.78 -0.99 (-1.24%)
The Southern Company SO 42.79 -0.66 (-1.52%)
Target Corporation TGT 59.48 -0.24 (-0.40%)
Time Warner Inc TWX 67.08 -0.12 (-0.18%)
Texas Instruments Inc. TXN 45.52 +0.12 (0.26%)
U.S. Bancorp USB 42.34 -0.03 (-0.07%)
Verizon Communications... VZ 46.36 -0.34 (-0.73%)
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. WMT 74.38 -0.39 (-0.52%)
Walgreen Company WAG 66.83 -0.37 (-0.55%)
The Walt Disney Company DIS 80.52 -1.47 (-1.79%)
Wells Fargo & Co WFC 47.81 -0.59 (-1.22%)
Sprint Corporation S 8.72 +0.04 (0.46%)
This data is the previous day’s closing price and should be used for informational purposes
only. The accuracy of these details is not warranted.
Abuse From Page 1A
Armed From Page 1A
Bus From Page 1A
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Thursday, March 20, 2014 5A
Nye said he met the
boy in April in an on-
line chat room, and they
physically met in Indiana
in June and developed a
relationship that included
exchanging graphic pic-
tures of themselves. Nye
said he and a friend drove
to Wisconsin to watch the
boy perform in a play and
later agreed to meet at the
park afer the boy’s moth-
er went to sleep.
Nye said he and the
boy had been sexual ac-
tive Saturday but believed
they did nothing wrong
because they were en-
gaged last year.
tion and the proper insur-
ance will be billed. Also,
employees who do not
have insurance can pay a
fee that ends up being sig-
nifcantly less than other
diagnostic centers.
Roby said that there are
some guidelines regarding
who is allowed to utilize
the services of the bus.
“Any female over the
age of 40 can utilize the
mammography bus, so
long as it has been a year
since their previous mam-
mogram and they are not
pregnant, not nursing
and have had no previ-
ous breast cancer,” Roby
said. “Females between 35
and 39 can also utilize the
mammography bus with a
writen prescription from
their doctor.”
Te success of this pro-
gram is atributed to the
convenience of the oppor-
tunity, Roby said.
“When we frst brought
the mammography bus to
Miller’s Textile Services,
several of the ladies had
never had a mammogram,”
Roby said. “And told me
they probably wouldn’t
have done so if we hadn’t
brought the mammogra-
phy bus in.”
Adding to the success
of the program is the fact
that having the bus as an
option has led to early
detection for a number of
employees at Miller’s Tex-
tile Services.
“Several of our em-
ployees have received
diagnoses that required
further followup,” Roby
said. “Early detection is
the key with breast cancer.
With the mobile mam-
mography unit available
at the work site, there is
no reason for our eligible
employees not to take ad-
vantage of testing.”
Roby would encourage
other Wapakoneta busi-
nesses to look into this
service as an option to of-
fer to their employees.
“Te convenience,
quality of service and the
fact that your insurance
company is billed direct
are all reasons other busi-
nesses should consider
this,” Roby said. “Tere is
no extra cost to bring the
bus to your facility.”
synostosis, which means
skull surgery in the sum-
mer. So we have met with
plastic surgeons and neu-
ro surgeons.
She has fused verte-
brae in her lower back
with an extra half verte-
brae present. We see or-
thopedics, but they won’t
know what to do for her
until MRI in August.
She’s going to need oph-
thalmologist in April, not
sure what her vision will
be.”
Tinking they were
beginning to grasp an un-
derstanding of Elizabeth’s
conditions, the Klop-
festeins took her home,
only to be sent back to
the hospital a week later
with the baby screaming
in pain.
“Children’s couldn’t
pin point any sight of
pain,” Kristi said, “so, af-
ter checking her surgery
sight from her herni-
ated umbilical cord and
watching her for couple
hours, they sent us home.
We felt frustrated.”
At the beginning of
February, the Klopfes-
teins took Elizabeth to
receive results from her
genetics doctor.
“We never would have
imagined that on that
day our world would be
turned upside down for-
ever, and all we thought
we knew about our
daughter would change,”
Kristi said. “We were told
Elizabeth has a rare 1 in
50,000 — geneticist said
more like 1 in 100,000
— syndrome called 9p-
deletion.”
Kristi said the result is
a loss of genetic material
that is normally found
within the chromosome.
All of the abnormali-
ties Elizabeth present-
ed matched with the
syndrome. Tere is no
known cure.
“With some of the re-
search Tony and I have
done, we have realized
not one child with 9p
minus is the same as an-
other — so we are lef
with hope for Elizabeth,”
Kristi said.
She will be undergo-
ing her frst surgery on
her skull this summer.
Kristi said she and
Tony are taking life “day
by day,” and enjoying
their time spent with
their daughter.
“We have truly felt the
love of the local commu-
nities, extended family
and friends with quarter
auction being thrown in
Elizabeth’s name,” Kristi
said.
Baby From Page 1A
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404 Hamilton Rd.
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419-738-9658
800-995-0247
1103 Gardenia Dr.
Suite 1
Wapakoneta, OH
419-738-4849
866-738-4849
Chad F. Metzger
Financial
Advisor
If a Company You Own Is
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www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Thursday, March 20, 2014 6A
Come Check Out These from Area Eateries!
FANTASTIC
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• Seafood Bufet $11.99
Includes Shrimp, Ocean Perch, Cod, Pollock and Salad Bar
• Weekly of the menu fsh specials!
1/4 Mile Of I-75 At Exit 99 • 937-394-3002
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Friday Nights during Lent!
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Sunday 11am-9pm
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American Legion Post 330
1108 E. Benton • Wapakoneta, OH
419-738-9369
OPEN TO MEMBERS & GUESTS
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9 North Wood Street
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LENTEN SPECIALS
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* 21 Piece Shrimp/Fry Basket ... $4.39
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“Where the healing starts and the pain stops”
KUALA LUMPUR,
Malaysia (AP) — Mili-
tary search planes few
over a remote part of the
Indian Ocean on Turs-
day hunting for debris in
"probably the best lead" so
far in fnding the missing
Malaysia Airlines fight,
of cials said.
Te four planes were
checking to see if two
large objects spoted in
satellite imagery bobbing
in the ocean were debris
from Fight 370 that went
missing March 8 with 239
people on board.
Australian authorities
said the frst plane to reach
the area was unable to lo-
cate the debris through
clouds and rain, but that
other planes would con-
tinue the hunt.
One of the objects
spoted by satellite imag-
ery was almost 80 feet in
length and the other was
15 feet. Tere could be
other objects in the area,
a four-hour fight from
Australia's southwestern
coast, said John Young,
manager of the Australian
Maritime Safety Author-
ity's emergency response
division.
"Tis is a lead, it's prob-
ably the best lead we have
right now," Young said. He
cautioned that the objects
could be seaborne debris
along a shipping route
where containers can fall
of cargo vessels, although
the larger object is longer
than a container.
Young told a news con-
ference in Canberra, Aus-
tralia's capital, that planes
had been sent to the area
about 1,550 miles south-
west of Perth to check on
the objects. He said satel-
lite images "do not always
turn out to be related to
the search even if they
look good, so we will hold
our views on that until
they are sighted close-up."
Australian Prime Min-
ister Tony Abbot earlier
told Parliament about the
debris, and said Orion
search aircraf had been
dispatched.
Young said visibility
was poor and may ham-
per eforts to fnd the ob-
jects. He said they "are
relatively indistinct on the
imagery ... but those who
are experts indicate they
are credible sightings. Te
indication to me is of ob-
jects that are a reasonable
size and probably awash
with water, moving up
and down over the sur-
face."
Military planes from
Australia, the U.S. and
New Zealand have been
searching in a region
over the southern Indian
Ocean that was narrowed
down from 232,000
square miles to 117,000
square miles.
Young said the depth
of the ocean in the latest
area, which is south from
where the search had been
focused since Monday, is
several thousand meters
(yards). He said com-
mercial satellites had been
redirected in the hope of
geting higher resolution
images. He did not say
when that would happen.
Te current images are
not sharp enough to de-
termine any markings.
Te Australian Mari-
time Safety Authority re-
leased two images of the
whitish objects foating
on or just under the sur-
face. Te images were tak-
en March 16, but Austra-
lian Air Commodore John
McGarry said it took time
to analyze them.
"Te task of analyz-
ing imagery is quite dif-
fcult, it requires drawing
down frames and going
through frame by frame.
Te moment this imagery
was discovered to reveal a
possible object that might
indicate a debris feld, we
have passed the informa-
tion from defense across
to AMSA for their action,"
he said.
Te AMSA said on
their of cial Twiter ac-
count that the crew of a
P3 Orion plane was not
able to spot the objects
Tursday through lim-
ited visibility but that the
search would continue.
Malaysian Defense
Minister Hishammuddin
Hussein told a news con-
ference Tursday that the
satellite images, "while
credible, still must be con-
frmed."
Some analysts said the
debris is most likely not
pieces of Flight 370. "Te
chances of it being de-
bris from the airplane are
probably small, and the
chances of it being debris
from other shipping are
probably large," said Jason
Middleton, an aviation
professor at the Univer-
sity of New South Wales
in Sydney.
KIEV, Ukraine (AP)
— Russia faces further
sanctions from the Euro-
pean Union on Tursday
over its annexation of the
Crimean Peninsula as
tensions in the region re-
mained high despite the
release of a Ukrainian na-
val commander.
In an address to the
German Parliament in
Berlin, Chancellor Angela
Merkel said the EU was
readying further sanc-
tions and that the G-8
forum of leading econo-
mies had been suspended
indefnitely. Russia holds
the presidency of the G-8
and President Vladimir
Putin was due to host his
counterparts, including
President Barack Obama,
at a summit in Sochi in
June.
"So long as there aren't
the political circum-
stances, like now, for an
important format like the
G-8, then there is no G-8,"
Merkel said. "Neither the
summit, nor the format."
Earlier this week, the
EU and the United States
slapped sanctions on
certain individuals that
were involved in what
they say was the unlaw-
ful referendum in Crimea
over joining Russia. Mos-
cow formally annexed
Crimea earlier this week
in the wake of the poll.
Te Black Sea peninsula
had been part of Russia
for centuries until 1954
when Soviet leader Nikita
Khrushchev transferred it
to Ukraine.
Russian forces efec-
tively took control of
Crimea some two weeks
ago in the wake of the
ouster of Ukraine's pro-
Russia president, Vik-
tor Yanukovych, afer
months of protests and
sporadic violence. Te
crisis erupted late last year
afer Yanukovych backed
out of an association deal
with the EU in favor of
a promised $15 billion
bailout from Russia. Tat
angered Ukrainians from
pro-European central and
western regions.
Debris sighted of Australia
EU mulls further
sanctions against
Russia; G8 on hold
Duke
Gonzaga
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Massachuset t s
Manhat t an
Michigan State
Cal Pol y
Tennesee
Provi dence
Oregon
Ohi o St at e
LA- Laf ayet t e
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NC St at e
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New Mexi co
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Botkins • Corner of 25A & 274
Mon.-Sat. 11am-12am
Sunday 11am-9pm
937-693-8043
The Inn Between
We cater for company functions,
weddings & rehearsal dinners,
parties, and family get-togethers!
WATCH ALL OF THE
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• Home Loans
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• Refinances
For More Information Contact Michelle
121 W. Auglaize St.
Wapakoneta, OH 45895
Bus: 419-738-3232
Cell: 419-302-1112
Dick Brorein
FRESH CUT RETAIL MEAT
728 Keller Dr. • Wapakoneta
419-738-4217
Open 6 Days a Week
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102 N. Wood
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419-738-7269
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Insurance Agency, Inc.
Jon C. Derryberry
Specializing in Health Insurance
419-738-8145
127 W. Auglaize St. •Wapakoneta
Wapakoneta, Ohio
www.gawintzer.com
Since 1848
The Original Recyclers
FUNERAL HOME
“WORTHY OF YOUR TRUST”
1102 LINCOLN AVENUE
(State Route 501)
WAPAKONETA, OHIO 45895
(419) 738-7676
www.bayliffandeleyfh.com
Kansas
Ameri can
11 E. Mechanic St.
Wapakoneta, OH 45895
419-738-8956
COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL
RELAX, IT’S RHEEM™
2 Willipie St.
Wapakoneta, OH
419-739-2200
EMPLOYEE OWNED - EMPLOYEE OPERATED
TIMMERMAN Co.
John P.
Since 1960
Heating - Air
Conditioning Plumbing
24 HOUR
SERVICE
Never Pay
Overtime
Toll Free: 1-800-686-4187
Open 7 Days A Week
Mon - Fri 10 - 9,
Saturday 10 - 8, Sunday 12 - 6
419-224-7117
Use your
tax refund
for a good
night’s sleep!
2151 Elida Rd.
Lima, Ohio 45805
catering@thespottoeat.com
201 S. Ohio • Sidney, OH
937-492-9181
303 N. Main St.
Botkins
937-693-8271
S
C
COLLECTIBLES
Miami Valley Centre Mall Piqua
937-773-0950
Mon.-Sat. 10-9 Sun. Noon-6
WE BUY OLD COINS
Paying Top Dollar for Silver
Coins, 1964 & earlier dimes,
quarters or halves.
2640 W. Michigan St.
Sidney, OH 45365
937-497-1101
M,W,F 9-8 / T, TH 9-5 / Sat. 9-2 / Sun. 12-5
WAPAKONETA
202 Willipie Street
(419) 738-4512
ST. MARYS
462 Fortman Drive
(419) 300-8980
SuperiorFCU.com S
Memphi s
Texas
Jon M. Wade, CIC
Agent
Lisa Sheipline, RHU, ACBC
Agent
24 W Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta, OH 45895
419-738-3617
Kenneth J. Jackson, DDS
“Helping The Whole Family Smile”
809 Redskin Trail • Wapakoneta
419-738-2426
www.AuglaizeFamilyDental.com
10736 Santa Fe Line Rd.
419-568-3992 937-596-6667 937-843-4841
Serving Agriculture For
over 100 years!
LAND SURVEYI NG, LLC
121 W. Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta
Office: (419) 738-8413
Fax: (419) 738-7716
Binkley.Surveying@roadrunner.com
The
Palazzo
309 S. Main St., Botkins
937-693-6325
937-538-6730
Owners: Bob & Carl Doseck
• Weddings • Receptions
• Banquets • Anniversaries
Wapakoneta Daily
News Printing
Company
520 Industrial Drive
Wapakoneta
419-738-2128
St . Josephs
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Thursday, March 20, 2014 7A
103 S. Blackhoof St. Wapakoneta
www.RSRE.com
Chet Hittepole
419-234-2458
UCLA
St ephen F Aust i n
Real Estate Professionals
502 N. Dixie Hwy., Suite 102
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
(419) 738-1161 - Office
(419) 738-1162 - Fax
www.merritt-re.com
Del aware
Nort h Carol i na
Jeremy Huebner Kyle Binkley
567-204-5590 419-236-3768
www.binkleyre.com
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APRIL 5 AND 7
NORTH TEXAS
National
Championship
APRIL 7
Watch On
DAYTON
MARCH 18-19
First Round*
Second Round
MARCH 20-21
Second Round
MARCH 20-21
Third Round
MARCH 22-23
Third Round
MARCH 22-23
Regional
Semifinals
MARCH 27-28
Regional
Finals
MARCH 29-30
National
Semifinals
APRIL 5
Regional
Semifinals
MARCH 27-28
Regional
Finals
MARCH 29-30
National
Semifinals
APRIL 5
Watch the tournament on these networks
or online at NCAA.COM/MARCHMADNESS
March 20 and 22 second-/third-round sites: Buffalo, Milwaukee, Orlando, Spokane. March 21 and 23 second-/third-round sites: Raleigh, San Antonio, San Diego, St. Louis.
March 27 and 29 regional sites: Anaheim, Memphis. March 28 and 30 regional sites: Indianapolis, New York.
***ALL TIMES EASTERN***
© 2014 National Collegiate Athletic Association. No commercial use without the NCAA's written permission.
The NCAA opposes all forms of sports wagering.
Albany (18-14)
Mt. St. Mary’s (16-16)
NC State (21-13)
Xavier (21-12)
Florida (32-2)
Albany
Pittsburgh (25-9)
Colorado (23-11)
VCU (26-8)
Stephen F. Austin (31-2)
Tulsa (21-12)
UCLA (26-8)
Ohio State (25-9)
Dayton (23-10)
Western Mich. (23-9)
Syracuse (27-5)
Stanford (21-12)
New Mexico (27-6)
Eastern Ky. (24-9)
Kansas (24-9)
Virginia (28-6)
Coastal Caro. (21-12)
G. Washington (24-8)
Memphis (23-9)
Harvard (26-4)
Cincinnati (27-6)
Michigan State (26-8)
Delaware (25-9)
Providence (23-11)
North Carolina (23-9)
Iowa State (26-7)
NC Central (28-5)
St. Joseph’s (24-9)
Connecticut (26-8)
Milwaukee (21-13)
Villanova (28-4)
Arizona (30-4)
Oklahoma St. (21-12)
Gonzaga (28–6)
Weber State (19-11)
Oklahoma (23-9)
N. Dakota St. (25-6)
New Mexico St. (26-9)
San Diego St. (29-4)
Baylor (24-11)
La.-Lafayette (23-11)
Creighton (26-7)
BYU (23-11)
Oregon (23-9)
American (20-12)
Wisconsin (26-7)
Wichita State (34-0)
Kansas State (20-12)
Kentucky (24-10)
Saint Louis (26-6)
Louisville (29-5)
Manhattan (25-7)
Massachusetts (24-8)
Tennessee
NC State
Cal Poly
Mercer (26-8)
Duke (26-8)
Arizona State (21-11)
Texas (23-10)
Wofford (20-12)
Michigan (25-8)
Cal Poly (13-19)
Texas So. (19-14)
Iowa (20-12)
Tennessee (21-12) 16
16
12
12
16
16
11
11
Nebraska (19-12)
MEMPHIS
March 27 & 29
NEW YORK
March 28 & 30
INDIANAPOLIS
March 28 & 30
ANAHEIM
March 27 & 29
St. Louis
Mar 23
Orlando
Mar 22
Raleigh
Mar 23
Milwaukee
Mar 22
San Diego
Mar 23
Spokane
Mar 22
San Antonio
Mar 23
Milwaukee
Mar 22
Raleigh
Mar 23
Spokane
Mar 22
San Antonio
Mar 23
Buffalo
Mar 22
San Diego
Mar 23
Buffalo
Mar 22
St. Louis
Mar 23
Orlando
Mar 22
Mar 21, 2:10PM - TNT
Mar 20, approx. 9:57PM - truTV
Mar 20, approx. 7:27PM - truTV
Mar 21, approx. 4:40PM - TNT
Mar 20, 12:40 - truTV
Mar 20, approx. 3:10PM - truTV
Mar 21, approx. 3:10PM - truTV
Mar 21, 12:40PM - truTV
Mar 21, 9:40PM - CBS
Mar 21, approx. 7:10PM - CBS
Mar 20, approx. 7:10PM - CBS
Mar 21, 12:15PM - CBS
Mar 20, approx. 9:50PM - TNT
Mar 20, approx. 9:40PM - CBS
Mar 21, approx. 2:45PM - CBS
Mar 20, approx. 7:20PM - TNT
Mar 20, approx. 4:10PM - TBS
Mar 21, approx. 9:57PM - truTV
Mar 21, approx. 7:27PM - truTV
Mar 20, 1:40PM - TBS
Mar 21, approx. 4:10PM - TBS
Mar 21, 1:40PM - TBS
Mar 20, approx. 2:45PM - CBS
Mar 20, 12:15PM - CBS
Mar 21, approx. 6:55PM - TBS
Mar 21, approx. 9:25PM - TBS
Mar 20, approx. 9:25PM - TBS
Mar 21, approx. 9:50PM - TNT
Mar 20, approx. 4:40PM - TNT
Mar 20, approx. 6:55PM - TBS
Mar 21, approx. 7:20PM - TNT
Mar 20, 2:10PM - TNT
65
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Mar 19 Mar 19 Mar 18 Mar 18
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Youth in Agricul-
ture and Passing on the
Farm: Two entertaining
speakers coming to Mer-
cer County.
“I’m Farming and I
Grow It” or “Chore” are
witty parodies created
by the Peterson Broth-
ers from rural Kansas
focusing on the life of a
farmer.
These parodies spread
the message to America’s
youth about the impor-
tance of agriculture and
the hard work it entails.
For this reason the Mer-
cer County Fair Board,
Farm Bureau, and the
Wright State University
- Lake Campus Agricul-
ture and Food Science
Program are pleased to
bring Greg Peterson in
to speak about the im-
portance of agriculture
and the role America’s
youth will play in the in-
dustry.
The Peterson Broth-
ers have created vari-
ous music parodies on
You Tube to promote
agriculture and create a
greater appreciation for
the work that members
of the farming commu-
nity contribute to our
society. These videos
help to increase aware-
ness of agriculture to
the public by providing
clever messages through
music about agricul-
ture’s roll in America.
In addition to Greg
Peterson, David Mar-
rison, Ohio State Ex-
tension Educator from
Ashtabula and Geauga
Counties, will be pro-
viding an entertaining
and educational presen-
tation about “Passing on
the Farm.” Come listen
to David for tips and
information on how to
pass your agricultural
land and business onto
the next generation.
The public will have
the opportunity to listen
to Greg Peterson and
David Marrison on April
15 at the Mercer County
Fairgrounds.
The Ag Breakfast will
start at 7:30 a.m. with a
meal consisting of sau-
sage, eggs, pancakes,
home fries, milk, coffee,
and juice. Following the
breakfast Greg Peterson
and David Marrison will
begin presenting around
8 a.m., with the program
concluding around 10
a.m.
Besides the breakfast
and speakers, various
agriculture businesses
and agencies will have
displays set up provid-
ing information to par-
ticipants.
The cost of the break-
fast is only $10 and you
can contact the Mercer
County Fair Board of-
fice at 419-586-3239 for
reservations.
Not only will Greg be
presenting for the pub-
lic, but he is also pro-
viding a presentation on
the agriculture industry
to local students. FFA,
4-H, or any students in-
terested agriculture are
welcome to attend this
event that will begin at
10:30 a.m. and conclude
around 12:30 p.m.
With generous spon-
sorship from local do-
nors, students will also
enjoy a complimentary
lunch provided by Mer-
cer County Cattlemen
and Pork Producers. If
any teachers or schools
are interested in attend-
ing, please contact the
Mercer County Fair
Board at 419-586-3239
or greg.mcglinch@
wright.edu with the
number of students at-
tending by April 4th,
2014.
We encourage all
businesses, farmers, or
anyone interested to at-
tend the Ag Breakfast
at the Mercer County
Fairgrounds. This is
an opportunity to see
how America’s youth is
leading the way in Agri-
culture and learn about
passing the farm onto
the next generation of
agriculturists.
Contact the Mercer
County Fair Board of-
fice at 419-586-3239 for
tickets or more informa-
tion.
To hear some of the
Peterson Brothers paro-
dies look for them on
YouTube.
agriculture
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Thursday, March 20, 2014 8A
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Dr. Kenneth Pohl
Orthopedics
Now accepting patients at:
Orthopedic Reconstructive
Surgery
41 South Stanfield Road
Suite C
Troy, OH 45373
Phone: (800) 433-2054
Dr. Pohl is welcoming new patients at his new
location in Troy. Dr. Pohl is ready to provide the
highest quality of orthopedic care. He has forty
years in developing knee and hip joint surgery.
This experience gives him the wisdom to choose
the ideal procedure for each patient. Every patient
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Dr. Pohl specializes in partial knee resurfacing,
bilateral knee resurfacing, total knee resurfacing/
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ketteringphysiciannetwork.org
Each year producers
ask the question when is
the best time to apply N
to wheat?  Also, is it OK
to apply nitrogen on fro-
zen ground?
For any N applica-
tion the question to ask
is when does the crop
need N. Wheat does not
require large amounts of
N until stem elongation
(Feekes Growth Stage
6), which is the middle
or the end of April de-
pending on the location
in state.  Ohio research
has shown no yield ben-
efit from applications
made prior to this time
period.  Soil organic
matter or N applied at
planting generally pro-
vides sufficient N for
early growth until stem
elongation.
Nitrogen applied
prior to rapid utiliza-
tion has the potential
to be lost and unavail-
able for the crop.  Ni-
trogen source will also
affect the potential for
loss.  Urea-ammonium
nitrate (28 percent) has
the greatest potential for
loss, ammonium sulfate
the least, and urea would
be somewhere between
the two other sources.
Ohio research has
shown yield losses
from N applied prior to
green-up regardless of
the N source. 
The level of loss
depends on the year. 
There has never been a
yield increase from ap-
plications made prior
to green-up compared
to green-up or Feekes
Growth Stage 6 applica-
tions.
Ho w -
e v e r ,
t h e r e
is a le-
gi t i mat e
c onc e r n
that wet
we a t he r
may pre-
vent application of N at
early stem elongation.
Ohio research has
shown a yield decrease
may occur when N ap-
plication is delayed un-
til Feekes Growth Stage
9 (early boot).  Thus a
practical compromise is
to topdress N any time
fields are suitable for
application after initial
green-up to early stem
elongation.
There is still a po-
tential for loss even at
green-up applications. 
To lessen this risk a pro-
ducer may want to use
an N source that has the
least potential for loss
for earlier applications. 
The source of N is not
as critical as the appli-
cation date approaches
stem elongation.
In summary, a produc-
er may get away with ap-
plying N prior to green-
up on wheat.  However;
university data has not
shown a yield advantage
for these early applica-
tions, but results have
shown in certain years
a major N loss and yield
reduction from applica-
tions prior to green-up. 
Why take the risk, just
wait until green-up; the
wheat does not need
most of the N until April
and May anyway.
When is the right
time to apply
nitrogen to wheat?
John
Smith
Speakers coming to Lake Campus
SURPRISE, Ariz. (AP)
— Cincinnati Reds closer
Aroldis Chapman broke
bones above
his lef eye and
nose when
he was hit by
a line drive
Wednesday night, the lat-
est frightening injury to a
pitcher struck in the head
by a bated ball.
Chapman was under-
going further testing at
Banner Good Samaritan
Medical Center, where he
was set to spend the night
for observation, accord-
ing to a statement from
the Reds.
First-year manager
Bryan Price said Chap-
man was conscious and
talking as he was taken
of the feld during Cin-
cinnati’s spring training
game against the Kansas
City Royals.
Te exhibition was
called afer an 8-minute
delay with Kansas City
leading 6-3.
“Not good,” Price said.
“He lef the feld on a
stretcher, took a line drive
just above his lef eye is
what it looks like — a
contusion, a laceration,
and certainly needs to
be taken to the hospital
and checked. We’ve got
Tomas Vera, an assistant
trainer, is going to be with
him. And then we’ll get
our updates from there.”
Te hard-throwing
lef-hander was struck
by Salvador Perez’s liner
with two outs in the sixth
inning — the pitch was
clocked at 99 mph. Chap-
man crumbled to the
ground, face down, his
legs failing. Te ball car-
omed into the third base
dugout. Medical person-
nel, including Royals Dr.
Vincent Key, rushed onto
the feld. Blood could be
seen on the mound.
Perez put his hands on
his helmet before reach-
ing frst base. He immedi-
ately went to the mound
where players from both
teams huddled as the
26-year-old Cuban re-
liever was being atended
to in an eerily silent sta-
SPORTS
W A P A K O N E T A
DAILY NEWS
Page 2B:
Franklin’s Kennard named
AP Ohio Mr. Basketball,
Elida’s Mathias 1 of 5 finalists
Sports Editor
BRAD FRANK
sports@wapakwdn.com
419-739-3508

QUOTE
of the day
“It’s just a real sickening
feeling for everybody. “You
can’t find it in your heart to
go out there and play.”
Ned Yost
Kansas City Royals manager
Baseball, softball tournaments in Fostoria
The Geary Family YMCA in Fostoria will be holding youth baseball and
softball tournaments in May.
A Spring Tune-Up softball tournament will be held May 6-8 for age
10-and-under and 12-and-under teams.
The entry fee is $250.
Teams are guaranteed six games.
A Spring Training Shoot-Out baseball tournament will be held May 30,
May 31 and June 1 for 10U and 12U teams.
Teams are guaranteed four games.
For more information, contact Greg Flores at 419-435-6608 or email
gflores@gearyfamilyymca.org.
SCHEDULE BRIEF
Today
College Basketball
NCAA South Region, 2nd round
Ohio St. vs. Dayton, 12:15 p.m.
NCAA East Region, 2nd round
Cincinnati vs. Harvard, 2:10 p.m.
NBA
Cavaliers vs. Thunder, 7 p.m.
NHL
Blue Jackets at Canadiens, 7:30 p.m.
CHAPMAN
Ohio St.
12:15 p.m.
Dayton
March 20
Cincinnati
2:10 p.m.
Harvard
March 20
Oakland
13
Cleveland
3 VS VS VS
Co-host of the nationally televised
show, Performance TV [Velocity
Channel] and NHR/IHR driver,
Kathy Fisher will be on-hand in the
Aesthetic Finishers display during
the upcoming 11th Annual Race
Cars and Future Stars Expo to be held
March 28-30, 2014 at the Miami Val-
ley Centre Mall in Piqua.
Fisher will have her K&N Filters/
Borla Exhaust/Armor Coat dragster
and, her husband and teammate, Kevin
Fisher’s Armor Coat/Ohio Crankshaf
Top Dragster on display throughout
the event, as well as available during
show hours for autographs.
“Afer this very long and cold win-
ter, it will be great to get out and start
thinking about warmer weather activ-
ities,” noted Fisher. “Of course for me,
that is automotive and racing related.
It will be fantastic to get rid of some of
this cabin fever and we are certainly
looking forward to being a part of the
Race Cars and Future Stars Expo.”
“Last year was my frst year partici-
pating in the Race Cars and Future
Stars Expo. I was blown away by the
event atendance and had an amazing
time visiting with so many folks of all
ages. I hoped that my schedule would
align to be able to participate again
this year and I can’t stress how much
I am anticipating being there again,”
she added.
In addition to her weekly co-host-
ing duties alongside fellow drag racer,
Tommy Johnson Jr. on “Performance
TV”, viewers can also fnd Fisher re-
suming her spot as one of the hosts
on the “Te Lokar Car Show Series”,
when it returns to Velocity again this
fall. A fourth season of her popu-
lar online drag racing reality series,
“Married With Dragsters”, that she
shares with husband Kevin, will also
begin production this spring.
A multi-time event champion,
Fisher will embark on her 2014
NHR/IHR drag racing national
and divisional schedule in the coming
weeks alongside her husband Kevin,
as part of their two-car team with Per-
formance by Fisher Racing.
Reds closer Aroldis
Chapman hit in
face by line drive
Ruck wins inaugural county tournament
Twenty of the areas top keg-
lers took to Astro Lanes on
Saturday night to compete in
the 1st annual Re-
vive Yourself Aug-
laize County Masters
bowling tournament.
Dan “Fuzz” Ruck
overcame the tough lane con-
ditions and completion to cap-
ture the championship.
“It was very tough tonight
and you really had to concen-
trate on making good shots,”
Ruck said. “I am just glad that
the bowling alley owners, J.J.
(Miller), and Revive Yourself
were able to put this together
for us to bowl in.”
Eddie Shaner led qualifying
afer six games, followed by f-
nalist Ruck, Nate Pence, Bran-
don Kennard and Jef Triplet.
Finishing sixth was Sarah
Moore, the highest fnishing fe-
male competitor, who missed
the fnals by a meager four pins.
Triplet, the lone lef-handed
fnalist led of match play with a
single-pin victory over a mem-
ber of the newly crowned Ohio
High School Athletic Associa-
tion state bowling champion,
Brandon Kennard, a freshman
at Wapakoneta High School.
Triplet kept it rolling by
defeating Nate Pence of St.
Marys’ Varsity Lanes, 209-169.
Ruck ended Triplet’s  run in
the semifnals with a 167-156
victory. In the fnal, Shaner and
Ruck batled a close match for
the frst half of the game before
Ruck pulled away to a 213-167
win.
Ruck commented on facing
Shaner in the fnals.
“Eddie and I bowl on the
same team and we are friends,
so it was special to bowl him in
the fnals,” he said. “My coach
and ball driller Bubba (Jim
Brannan) supported me and
helped me during tonight and
deserves some of the credit.”
Shaner discussed the fnals
match.
“Te lanes were very difer-
ent in the fnals, and I could not
catch up fast enough,” Shaner
said afer the match. “Everyone
recognizes Fuzz (Ruck) as the
best in Wapak, and he proved it
by bowling a great game against
me in the fnals. I am happy for
him and I am glad the Propri-
etor’s Plaque stayed in Wapak.”
Next year’s tournament will
move to Varsity Lanes in St.
Marys.
B
Thursday, March 20, 2014
See CHAPMAN, Page 2B
By BRAD FRANK
SPORTS EDITOR
Hardin Northern High
School in Dola will become
a member of the Northwest
Central Conference,
NWCC Commis-
sioner David May
announced Wednes-
day night in an email.
“Te NWCC is excited to
have Hardin Northern join the
league and is looking forward to
a long term relationship,” May
said in the email.
Hardin Northern’s athletic
teams, the Polar Bears, will be-
gin competing in the NWCC in
all sports minus football starting
with the 2014-15 school year.
HN will become a full mem-
ber of the conference starting
with the 2015-16 school year
when its football program will
join the NWCC.
Te (Findlay) Courier re-
ported HN’s school board voted
to apply for membership in the
NWCC on Feb. 19. One month
later, the conference announced
the school as a new member.
Te NWCC’s current mem-
bership consists of Lehman
Catholic (Sidney), Perry (Lima),
Ridgemont (Ridgeway), River-
side (DeGraf), Temple Chris-
tian (Lima), Upper Scioto
Valley (McGufey), Waynes-
feld-Goshen (Waynesfeld) and
Fort Loramie.
Temple Christian does not
sponsor a football program, so
Hardin Northern will be the
conference’s eighth football-
playing member starting with
the 2015 season.
Fort Loramie is a football-
only member of the NWCC, so
Hardin Northern will put the
conference at eight members in
all other sports.
Te Polar Bears did not feld
a varsity football team for the
2013 season. Tey will play an
independent schedule in 2014
before joining the NWCC in
2015.
Waynesfeld-Goshen is
scheduled to play a non-confer-
ence football game against HN
in Week 2 of the 2014 season.
Hardin Northern High
School has one of the smallest
enrollments among Ohio High
School Athletic Association
members, with a combined 105
boys and girls in grades 9-11 as
of the OHSAA’s most recent fg-
ures approved in May 2013.
Hardin Northern to join Northwest Central Conference
National
TV host
going to
Piqua
show
School to join conference in all sports minus football starting with 2014-15 school year, football team to join starting in 2015
sports
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Thursday, March 20, 2014 2B
GOODYEAR, Ariz. (AP) —
Sam Fuld scored two runs on two
singles and a walk, leading the
Oakland Athletics over the Cleve-
land Indians 13-3 on Wednesday.
Te center felder has scored
13 runs in 12 games as the A’s
leadof hiter.
Yoenis Cespedes, who
snapped an 0 for 23 slump Mon-
day, drove in a run in Oakland’s
two-run ffh inning against
Carlos Carrasco, who is trying
to earn the fnal opening in the
Indians’ rotation.
Carrasco followed starter
Danny Salazar and inherited a 3-0
lead. Carrasco gave up eight runs
— fve earned — in 2 2/3 innings.
Top shortstop prospect Fran-
cisco Lindor doubled and scored
in the third and contributed a run
scoring single as the Indians built
a 3-0 lead against A’s starter Dan
Straily.
Infelder Nate Frieman hit a
three-run home run for Oakland
of minor leaguer Shawn Arm-
strong to break the game open in
the eighth.
A’s rough up Carrasco for win over Indians
13
3
Ewing bio receives baseball book award
A biography of Auglaize County
native Bob Ewing has been named
the winner of a prestigious award
from the Society for American
Baseball Research (SABR).
Author Mike Lackey will receive
the 2014 Larry Riter Book Award
for “Spitballing: Te Baseball Days
of Long Bob Ewing.” Judges praised
Lackey for his scrupulous research
and called the book “a superbly
drawn portrait of one of early base-
ball’s grinders and his era.”
Te Riter Award is given annual-
ly for the best book about baseball’s
so-called “dead ball” era, 1901 to
1919. Te award is named in honor
of Lawrence S. Riter, who wrote
or co-wrote several baseball books
including the groundbreaking oral
history “Te Glory of Teir Times.”
Riter, who died in 2004, was a pro-
fessor of economics and fnance at
New York University.
Te award will be presented in
August at SABR’s annual conven-
tion in Houston, Texas.
Ewing, who lived all his life in
or near Wapakoneta, pitched in the
major leagues from 1902 to 1912
and is a member of the Cincinnati
Reds Hall of Fame. Lackey is a long-
time newspaper reporter, editor
and columnist who lives in Lima.
He spent 16 years researching and
writing the book.
“Spitballing” (Orange Frazer
Press, $19.99) recounts a colorful
time in baseball and American his-
tory. Te book also details Ewing’s
post-baseball life, including two
terms as Prohibition-era sherif of
Auglaize County.
Te book was previously a fnal-
ist for the 2013 CASEY Award, giv-
en by Spitball magazine for the best
baseball book of the year.
“Spitballing” is available at book-
stores in Cincinnati, Columbus,
Lima and St. Marys, at the Wapako-
neta Chamber of Commerce and at
the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. It
also may be ordered from www.ama-
zon.com or www.orangefrazer.com.
dium. An ambulance’s si-
ren could be heard in the
background while Chap-
man was loaded onto the
stretcher.
“It was an absolute bul-
let that Sal hit,” Royals
manager Ned Yost said.
“It’s just a real sickening
feeling for everybody.”
Players from both
teams kneeled, some
bowing their heads and
crossing themselves in
prayer.
Chapman was taken
to Banner Del E. Webb
Medical Center in Sun
City. He was then trans-
ferred to Banner Good
Samaritan Medical Cen-
ter.
Perez appeared to be
in tears as he lef the feld,
and frst baseman Eric
Hosmer hugged him. Per-
ez quickly lef the club-
house without speaking
to reporters. Hosmer hit
a line drive of the head of
Tampa Bay’s Alex Cobb
last June. Cobb sustained
a concussion.
Playing right feld,
Reds teammate Jay Bruce
heard the ball hit Chap-
man.
“It was one of the more
frightening and non-fun
moments I’ve been a part
of on the baseball feld,”
he said.
Afer Chapman was
driven of to the waiting
ambulance, Price and Yost
met with the umpires.
“It was really a mutual
agreement,” crew chief
Chris Guccione said.
“Players were ratled.
Te staf was ratled. Te
umpires were ratled.
We fgured it was best,
along with both teams in
agreement, that the game
should end.”
Yost said neither he nor
his players wanted to keep
playing. Price felt the
same way.
“You can’t fnd it in
your heart to go out there
and play,” he said.
Oakland pitcher Bran-
don McCarthy, who had
emergency surgery afer
he was struck in the head
by a line drive in Septem-
ber 2012, urged caution
in a post on Twiter.
“all reporting at this
point means zilch, until
he gets a scan,” he said in
a tweet.
Chapman, who throws
a 100 mph fastball, had
walked four Royals in the
inning before being in-
jured.
Te two-time All-Star
had 38 saves for the Reds
last season.
When reporters
walked into the Royals
clubhouse, third baseman
Mike Moustakas asked
a team of cial to request
that they leave.
“No one wants to talk,”
Moustakas said.
In January, Major
League Baseball approved
a protective cap for pitch-
ers following several ter-
rifying scenes similar to
this one in the last few
years, including Toronto’s
J.A. Happ, who sustained
a skull fracture.
Te heavier and big-
ger hats were available
for testing during spring
training on a voluntary
basis, but the cap appar-
ently would not have
helped Chapman in this
case.
“I know this isn’t un-
common as we would like
it to be, but it was fright-
ening,” Price said. “Cer-
tainly frightening.”
CINCINNATI (AP)
— Former Broncos de-
fensive end Robert Ayers
met on Wednesday with
the Cincinnati  Bengals,
who are looking to add to
their line.
Ayers was one of Den-
ver’s frst-round picks
in 2009, the 18th
overall, and started
his career as an out-
side linebacker. He
was switched to defensive
end for the 2011 season.
Ayers played in 15 games,
starting three of them,
last season as Denver
reached the Super
Bowl and got routed
by Seatle 43-8.
He became an unre-
stricted free agent as Den-
ver overhauled its defense
and signed defensive end
DeMarcus Ware.
Te Bengals had the
No. 3 defense in the NFL
last season. Tey lost
defensive end Michael
Johnson, who signed with
Tampa Bay as a free agent.
Former Broncos DE Robert Ayers visits Cincinnati
Chapman From Page 1B
DAYTON (AP) —
Jarnell Stokes dominated
inside as Tennessee f-
nally caught
up in the clos-
ing minutes
of regulation,
and then
opened over-
time with a
t hr ee- poi nt
play that got
the Volunteers
headed to a
78-65 victory
over Iowa on Wednesday
night in the NCAA’s First
Four.
Te Volunteers’ late
comeback sent them Ra-
leigh, N.C., where they’ll
play sixth-seeded Massa-
chusets on Friday in the
Midwest Regional.
Tennessee (22-12)
didn’t lead until Antonio
Barton’s 3-pointer put the
Vols up 59-57 with 3:05
lef regulation. Tere
were fve lead changes
before the Vols’ Jordan
McRae missed a jumper
missed at the buzzer,
leaving it tied at 64.
Stokes’ three-point
play was the key moment
in his 18-point, 13-re-
bound performance.
Iowa (21-13) managed
only one free throw in
overtime, ending a hec-
tic and stressful day for
coach Fran McCafery.
McCafery started the
day in Iowa with his teen-
age son Patrick, who had
surgery to remove a thy-
roid tumor.
Vols rally to beat Iowa
in OT at NCAA First Four
Rich Peverley has been
released from an Ohio
hospital afer undergoing
successful sur-
gery to correct
an abnormal
heart rhythm,
just more than
a week afer
the Dallas Stars
forward col-
lapsed on the
bench during a game.
Stars general manager
Jim Nill said Peverley was
released from the Cleve-
land Clinic on Wednesday.
Te surgery was Monday.
Peverley, who is out for
the season, is expected to
return Tursday to Dal-
las. He will be monitored
closely and may require
further treatment.
“Tere is no decision
being made at this time
on his ability to return to
hockey participation,” Nill
said.
Te 31-year-old Pever-
ley was diagnosed with
atrial fbrillation before
training camp in Septem-
ber and opted for less
invasive treatment and
medication so he could
return sooner.
Peverley was out
through the frst game of
the regular season before
playing in 60 consecutive
games. A week before he
collapsed, he sat out a game
in Columbus because he
wasn’t feeling well.
Doctors said they
changed Peverley’s medi-
cation, and he returned
for two more games before
collapsing early in the frst
period against Columbus
on March 10. He was re-
leased from a Dallas hospi-
tal two days later.
Te game against the
Blue Jackets was postponed
with Columbus leading
1-0. It will be replayed
April 9 from the beginning
with the same score.
Stars say Peverley has successful heart surgery
78
65
DAYTON (AP) —
Chris Eversley scored 19
points and Cal Poly avoid-
ed its 20th loss
of the season
and won its
frst NCAA
t our na me nt
game with an
81-69 victory
over Texas
Southern on
We d n e s d a y
night in the
First Four.
Te Mustangs (14-19)
were 0-3 and 4-9 early
before losing nine of 11
heading into the Big West
Conference tournament
— which they won to
earn the program’s frst
NCAA bid.
Te team with the worst
record in the tournament
now moves on to face the
one with the best — top-
seeded Wichita State (34-
0) — in the second round
in St. Louis on Friday.
Aaric Murray, the for-
mer La Salle and West
Virginia player, closed out
his career with 38 points
for Texas Southern (19-
15), champs of the South-
western Athletic Confer-
ence tournament.
Cal Poly, just 14-19,
advances from NCAA
First Four game
81
69
COLUMBUS (AP) —
When you ask Luke Ken-
nard where he’s going to
play college basketball,
he lists fve of the biggest
names in the sport and
then quickly adds, “Not in
any particular order.”
Tose schools already
know he’s the best player
in Ohio. Now it’s of cial.
Te 6-foot-6 Franklin
High School junior is a
unanimous choice as win-
ner of the Ohio Associ-
ated Press Mr. Basketball
award.
Even though he was
a frst-team all-stater in
football, make no mistake
about it: He’s a blue-chip-
per in basketball. His fnal
fve are Duke, Ohio State,
Kentucky, North Carolina
and Michigan.
“It’s just been my fa-
vorite sport growing up,”
he said. “My dad likes to
tell people that I was born
with a ball in my hands.
Basketball comes a litle
bit more naturally to me. I
just think it would be neat
to be in that kind of atmo-
sphere in college.”
Kennard’s numbers on
the court are staggering.
He averaged 41 points,
10.4 rebounds, four as-
sists and two steals a
game. He scored 50 or
more three times while
shooting over 50 percent
from the feld, 42 percent
on 3-pointers and 85 per-
cent at the line.
Add the fact that last
fall as a quarterback he
completed 162 of 276
passes for 2,145 yards and
26 touchdowns with just
fve interceptions and it’s
easy to see why people
rave about his athletic
acumen.
“Not to put down other
kids, or to seem boastful,
but he just seemed like
he was playing chess and
the other kids were play-
ing checkers,” said Brian
Bales, his coach at Frank-
lin. “He’s two plays ahead
of everybody. He’s kind
of like that on a football
feld. It’s amazing. It’ll be a
dead play and all of a sud-
den he makes something
out of it.”
Tis basketball season,
he led Franklin — located
not far from Middletown,
hometown of the legend-
ary Jerry Lucas — to a
20-4 record. Te Wildcats
have won 35 consecutive
conference games. Tey
also traveled all around
the country, showcasing
their star player and ex-
posing him to some of the
best players and trickiest
defenses imaginable.
Everybody has tried to
stop Kennard. And with
litle luck.
“Tis year? I’ve proba-
bly seen them all,” he said
of the array of defenses.
Asked the weirdest X’s
and O’s he encountered,
Kennard laughed and re-
membered an early-sea-
son game against Oxford
Talawanda.
“Oh, man. Tere was a
guy face-guarding me, it
wasn’t really a box-and-1,”
he said. “It was like a 1-1-2
with a guy standing right
on me.”
Kennard isn’t just a
leader on the court or on
the feld. He carries a 4.3
grade-point average and
is near the top in his class
academically.
His dad, Mark, works
in a bank and played col-
lege ball at Georgetown,
Ky., where Luke’s sister,
Lauren, is a senior. His
mom, Jennifer, is a substi-
tute teacher.
During the summer,
Luke, who throws a foot-
ball right-handed but is a
lefy shooter in basketball,
has played on the King
James AAU team which
features many of the top
players in the state.
Luke is a marquee
player wherever his teams
play.
“Afer games, it’s noth-
ing for him to sign auto-
graphs for 30 or 45 min-
utes,” Bales said. “And
that’s even in showcases.
We’ve been to Myrtle
Beach, and he’s the No.
1 player they want auto-
graphs from and that’s
probably the best event
in America. Flyin’ To Te
Hoop, there was a line for
45 minutes with him sign-
ing autographs afer that
game.”
His signature will be
mighty valuable to a col-
lege team soon. He ex-
pects to scribble his name
on a leter of intent in the
next month or so.
“It’ll be prety nice to
get it over with and to
be able to enjoy my next
year and kind of get the
pressure of,” he said. “I’m
kind of looking forward to
it.”
Past winners of the
Ohio AP Mr. Basketball
award, determined by a
vote of sports journalists
from around the state, in-
clude NBA players LeB-
ron James (the only three-
time winner), O.J. Mayo,
Trey Burke and Jared Sull-
inger.
Others considered
this year include Elida’s
Dakota Mathias, Javon
Bess of Gahanna Lincoln,
Esa Ahmad of Shaker
Heights, Brady Arnold of
Millersburg West Holmes
and Peyton Aldridge of
Leavitsburg LaBrae.
Franklin’s Kennard is AP Ohio Mr. Basketball
Elida‘s Dakota Mathias, Purdue commit, 1 of 5 fnalists for the state’s player of year
DENNIS THE MENACE
ZITS
SNUFFY SMITH
HI AND LOIS
FUNKY WINKERBEAN
CRANKSHAFT
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
BABY BLUES
Annie’s Mailbox
Bridge
Crossword Puzzle
LOCKHORNS
Horoscope
Cooperative if approached in a spirit of friendship
For Friday, March 21, 2014
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
Satisfy your urge to do something different
today. You want to try your hand at something
new. At least be a tourist in your own city.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You are not casual about money, and most of
you are financial wizards. Today is a good day
to look at debt, bills and issues with shared
property.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
The Moon is opposite your sign today, which
means you have to go more than halfway when
dealing with others. In two weeks, others will
have to go more than halfway when dealing
with you.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Make a to-do list to get better organized, and
include how to get healthier as well. Why not
have it all? Be the best that you can be!
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
This is a wonderful, playful day. Enjoy sports
events, movies, fun times with children and
social occasions. Take a long lunch or meet
friends this evening.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
You’ll enjoy puttering around at home today.
Family and personal business are your top
priorities now. A chance to just relax in familiar
surroundings will please you.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
You feel curious today. You’re also keen to
enlighten others about something. Get out and
talk to whoever you can. Short trips also will
appeal.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Cash flow and financial matters are on your
mind. You see that a year from now, you’ll be
riding high, and you want to know how to get
there fast.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Today the Moon is in your sign, which makes
you more emotional than usual. However, it
also can make you a bit luckier. The universe
owes you a favor today.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You feel private today. This doesn’t mean you
are withdrawn or unfriendly; it simply means
you are relaxed and happy in your own skin.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
A discussion with a female friend could be
significant today. You might want to discuss
your hopes and dreams for the future in order
to get someone’s feedback.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Personal details about your private life might
be public today, especially in the eyes of par-
ents, bosses, teachers and VIPs. (Yikes.) Try to
do some damage control.
YOU BORN TODAY Although you have a touch
of the dreamer in you, you are forthright and
bold. You go after what you want with quiet
assurance. You like to express yourself physi-
cally, nonverbally. You are a courageous lead-
er. This is the year of growth for you. It is a
time of building and constructing. Strengthen
your financial position, and do not make major
changes yet.
Birthdate of: Phyllis McGinley, author/poet;
Eddie Money, musician/singer; Gary Oldman,
actor.
(c) 2014 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
DEAR ANNIE: My hus-
band and I are expecting our
second child. When our first
was born, my in-laws (who live
out of town) visited shortly
after the birth, and it was awful.
They tried to separate me from
our baby to have alone time
with him. And instead of help-
ing out, they created additional
work, even though I was still
recovering from the birth.
I don’t want to shut them
out, but would like the first visit
to take place at least a month
after the baby is born. My hus-
band is understanding, but
likes to please his family. How
can I tactfully schedule a visit
to preserve both my sanity and
my relationship with my hus-
band’s family? -- Not Looking
Forward
DEAR NOT: Your husband
must agree to support you in
this request. It would be best if
he could convince his parents
to wait before visiting. And of
course, this is not their first
grandchild, so they may be per-
fectly agreeable. If not, we rec-
ommend you enlist the help of
your pediatrician to suggest
that it’s better for the child to
wait until he has had his first set
of immunizations (usually at
two months). When they press
to come sooner, you can give in
slowly and eventually settle on
four weeks. We trust you will
give the same information to
your parents.
DEAR ANNIE: My hus-
band and I own a home on a
cul-de-sac. Most of the other
original owners have moved
on, and several of the homes
are now rentals and inhabited
by multiple families. This
means many, many cars. Two
homes alone account for 13
automobiles. Every home has a
spacious garage and driveway,
but these neighbors use that
space for junk. As a result, we
always have multiple cars
parked in front of our house,
sometimes for days at a time,
including giant SUVs parked
between two driveways, hang-
ing over on each side. And
because it’s a cul-de-sac, some-
times the cars are double-
parked.
I’ve called the police multi-
ple times, but they don’t always
show up, or by the time they
arrive, the offending vehicle has
been moved. A ticket or two
might teach these people, but
they just keep getting away with
it. I’m so tired of looking out
my living room window or sit-
ting on my patio looking at
other people’s cars. I feel as if I
live in a parking lot.
It’s not fair that I should
need to move out of my retire-
ment home in order to have a
decent view. I know you cannot
solve this for me. I’m just vent-
ing. -- Sick of Your Clunkers
DEAR SICK: We get it. Do
you have a neighborhood or
homeowners association of any
kind that could mediate this?
Do you think talking to your
neighbors would help? People
often don’t consider the possi-
bility that their neighbors
would be cooperative if they
were approached in a spirit of
friendship. But also ask the
police whether there is any-
thing else you can do.
DEAR ANNIE: I read the
letter from “Glad the Holidays
are Over,” whose mother-in-law
hogs the conversations and
constantly talks about herself.
That was me! For years, I
was loud and abrasive, hogged
conversations, interrupted and
didn’t listen, thinking instead of
what I was going to say next. I
thought I was the life of the
party and had to keep conversa-
tions going.
I learned my lesson when I
met another person like me. I
heard people say how he
wouldn’t let anyone get a word
in edgewise and that he must
not care about others. What an
eye opener! Since then, I’ve
learned to ask others questions
and actually wait for the
answers. It’s a relief not to be
responsible for all of the con-
versation, and it allows me to
get to know people better.
Please cut this out and send
it to those who feel they must
keep talking to avoid odd
silences. -- Minot, N.D.
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to annies-
mailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Cre-
ators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.
comics
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Thursday, March 20, 2014 3B
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AMOS Girod, Owner
647 E. 900 S., Geneva, IN 46740
CALL FOR MORE INFO. ON METAL ROOFS!
FREE ESTIMATES Call JOSH at
260-706-1665 for an appointment
419-905-7754
TOM SCHAEFER
Foundation Specialist
Schumann
Lawn Services
Byron Schumann
567-356-6589
Mowing • Trimming • Yard Work • Edging
17395 Pusheta Road | Wapakoneta, OH 45895
RAS44ELCD032014-S,
Reindel Auction Sales
CITY OF WAPAKO-
NETA
LEGAL NOTICE
On March 17, 2014
Wapakoneta City
Council passed Ord
2014-06, an Ordinance
authorizing the Direc-
tor of Public Service
and Safety to set spec-
ifications and advertise
for bids for the altera-
tion of storage building
at Harmon Park for
public restrooms within
the City of Wapakone-
ta. A copy of this Ordi-
nance in its entirety is
available upon request
at the Office of the
Clerk of Council, Wa-
pakoneta City Hall,
701 Parlette Court,
Wapakoneta, Ohio,
7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Monday thru Friday.
Dennis Faller, Law Di-
rector, City of Wapako-
neta, Ohio, has ap-
proved this summary.
LEGAL NOTICES
Dodge RV Camper
22 ft., sleeps 4. New
tires, new exhaust,
new brakes, stove,
fridge, bath w/shower
& toilet. New couch.
Asking $2,500 OBO.
Call 419-394-4866
RECREATIONAL
BOLD & SOLD! Is
what happens when
your ad stands out.
Only $1.00 additional
per word for bolding.
Call us now!
1996 Cadillac Sedan
DeVille: Low miles on
the NorthStar engine.
85 year old Mother-in-
law's car and Runs
GREAT! $,995. 419-
236-9754
AUTOS FOR
SALE
A nice 2 bd, new car-
pet, W/D hookup, cen-
tral air, large storage
shed, quiet location,
$475/month. 1033
Hendricks, St Marys
(419)953-2216
FOR
RENT
HOUSE FOR
RENT
St. Marys
Brand new apart-
ments. Hara Lane
2 bedroom, 2 bath,
large living area. No
steps, 1 car garage.
Great for retirement.
Available April 1.
419-678-2651
Spacious, total electric
1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments in St. Marys.
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Pets accepted.
Deposit only $200.00
419-394-8509
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
Now Accepting Appli-
cations
Beech Tree Hill Apart-
ments 416 Beech St.
St. Marys, Ohio 45885
419-394-5396
Mon. & Wed. 8:00 am-
4:30 pm or by appt.
2 bedroom apartments
with appliances fur-
nished. On site laundry
facility. Call for details
or pick up an applica-
tion at the rental office.
Possibility of rental as-
sistance. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity.
TDD#419-526-0466
“This institution is an
equal opportunity pro-
vider, and employer.”
Laurelwood and River-
side 1 & 2 bedroom
furnished and unfur-
nished apartments, no
pets, for more informa-
tion call Schlenker De-
velopments (419)738-
8111
Celina
1125 W. Bank Rd.
Unit #301- Lake front
Very nice 2 bedroom,
2 bath apartment. Ap-
pliances, garage, non-
pet. $625/month.
419-925-5123
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
Carpet & Flooring In-
stallation & or Sales.
Shop from home or get
a free quote on just in-
stallation. Impressions
Flooring. (419) 953-
7473
WORK WANTED
Childcare openings in
my Wapakoneta
home. 15+ years ex-
perience. Excellent ref-
erences. Call 419-204-
2665
CHILD CARE
NOW HIRING CLASS
A DRIVERS FOR
DEDICATED ROUTES
THAT ARE HOME
DAILY!!
Excellent opportunity
for CDL Class A Driv-
ers with 2 years' expe-
rience and a clean
MVR. All loads are
drop & hook or no
touch freight.
We reward our drivers
with excellent benefits
such as medical, den-
tal, vision & 401K with
company contribution.
In addition to that we
also offer quarterly bo-
nuses, paid holidays
and vacations.
To apply please con-
tact Dennis 419-733-
0642
A
pply
Today!
DRIVERS
SNAP-Ed Program
Assistant Position at
OSU Extension,
Auglaize County. For
complete position de-
scription and online
application instruc-
tions, please go to
www. j obsat osu. com
and search by requisi-
tion number 380801.
Applications due by
March 30, 2014. To
build diverse work-
force, Ohio State en-
courages applications
from individuals with
disabilities, minorities,
veterans, and women.
EEO/AA employer.
HELP WANTED
Open Interview
Event
Thursday March
20, 2014 10am-1pm
Staffmark is partner-
ing with Energizer
Personal Care in
Sidney to staff 1st
and 3rd shift long
term assembly and
production positions.
Open interviews on
Thursday March 20,
2014 from 10am-
1pm at Energizer
Personal Care Plant
1 located at 1810
Progress Way in
Sidney(on the cor-
ner of 4th Ave and
Progress). You can
also apply online at
www.staffmark.com
and choose the Sid-
ney, OH location.
Full Time STNA
FT 3rd shift STNA
needed. Please ap-
ply in person to:
St. Marys Living
Center, HR Manager
1209 Indiana Ave.
St. Marys, OH
45885
(419) 394-7611
E.O.E.
Conveniently locat-
ed across from St.
Marys Square!
help
wanted
HELP WANTED
Performance Im-
provement Manager
Excellent opportunity
for an experienced
clinician demonstrating
a proven track record
with performance im-
provement and hospi-
tal accreditation sur-
veys. The Grand Lake
Health System is re-
cruiting for its Perform-
ance Improvement
Manager that reports
to the Chief Clinical
Officer of Joint Town-
ship District Memorial
Hospital. Successful
candidates will have
an active Ohio license
and 5 years clinical ex-
perience in a health re-
lated field. Registered
Nurse preferred. Bach-
elor’s degree required
with Master’s in Busi-
ness or related Health-
care field preferred.
The position requires
excellent interpersonal
skills and must pos-
sess the ability to moti-
vate staff and build ef-
fective relationships.
Please apply online
at
www.grandlakehealth.
org
Oncology Practice with
offices in St. Marys
and Lima needs Full-
Time Certified Medi-
cal Assistant for cleri-
cal/clinical duties and
willing to travel to each
office. Previous office
experience a must.
Benefits included. Re-
sumes will be accept-
ed at 1004 S Knoxville
Ave, St. Marys OH or
email to
tripsmoncology@bright
.net.
HELP WANTED
Local masonry con-
tractor has full time po-
sitions available.
419-925-5213
Full-Time
CARRIER NEEDED –
ST. MARYS
If you are a morning
person with a reliable
vehicle, insurance, and
are at least 21 years of
age, then we have an
opportunity for you for
delivery of The Lima
News in St Marys!
Add an estimated
$275.00/week to your
household income.
Refer a friend, family
member, or take it
yourself during March
and get a gas card bo-
nus with value up to
$100. Call Bill Meeker
419-993-2112 or 800-
686-9914 X2112 or
apply online at:
http://limaohio.com/sec
tion/delivery.
Are you reading this
ad right now?
See - The Classifieds
Work. Call us to place
your Classified ad to-
day! Don't forget to
ask about centering
your ad for even faster
results!
Agriculture Part to Full
Time Warehouse help
needed. Also must be
able to do planting of
crops with modern
John Deere equip-
ment. MUST have ag-
riculture background
and dependable. You
can call or fax resume
to 419-753-2958 with
reference and pay.
APPLY
NOW!
HELP WANTED
A cure for the winter
blahs! A puppy from
Garwick’s the Pet Peo-
ple. Maltese, Shih-poo,
Yorkies, Pom-poo, Ti-
ny Chihuahua.
419-795-5711
garwicksthepetpeople.
com
PETS FOR
SALE
Firewood for sale - $60
pick up truck delivered.
$200 for a 14ft dump
trailer delivered 810-
656-9351
MISC. ITEMS
FOR SALE
Williams Tax Service
with 2 locations:
8 South Blackhoof
Street, Wapakoneta at
419-738-4494 and 307
East Spring Street, St.
Marys at 419-300-
8653. Personal, Busi-
ness, and Farm In-
come Taxes. Hours:
M-F 9-5; Sat. 9-1; Oth-
er Hours by Appt.
Rubber Stamps, Print-
ing services. We han-
dle all types of custom
printing and advertis-
ing needs. See us to-
day! Wapakoneta Dai-
ly News, 520 Industrial
Dr., Wapakoneta, Ohio
45895. 419-738-2128.
Photo restoration: Do
you have old photos
that are torn or faded
or otherwise dam-
aged? Let me help
preserve your family's
heirloom and important
pictures. I will scan
your photo, then tweak
it via the computer,
and reprint an image
for you. Reasonable
rates, charged by the
hour. Contact John at
419-738-1250 or via
e m a i l
at jzwez@bright.net
DAILY NEWS
W A P A K O N E T A
520 Industrial Dr.,
Wapakoneta, OH
419-738-2128
Various sizes
to choose
from at...
NOTE
PADS
BUSINESS
SERVICES
NOTICE
Investigate fully before
sending money as an
advance fee. For further
information, call or write:
Better Business Bureau
P.O. Box 269
Lima, OH 45802
419-223-7010
This notice provided as a
customer service by The
Wapakoneta Daily News.
BUSINESS
SERVICES
The Wapakoneta City
Schools Board of Edu-
cation hereby gives
notice, in accordance
with Section 3307.353
of the Ohio Revised
Code, that Mike Davis,
who is currently em-
ployed by the Board of
Education as a mainte-
nance person, will be
retiring and seeking re-
employment with the
Wapakoneta City
School District in the
same position follow-
ing his service retire-
ment. The Board of
Education will hold a
public meeting on the
issue of re-employing
the above named per-
son at a meeting to be
held on Tuesday, April
22, 2014, at 7:00 pm
at Wapakoneta Middle
School, 400 W Harri-
son St, Wapakoneta,
Ohio.
PUBLIC
NOTICES
Looking for a lady be-
tween the ages of 35-
40 to live with and care
for me. In a wheel-
chair. Call 419-739-
9049. Ask for Richard.
PERSONALS
PUBLIC
NOTICES
Subscribers:
Moving?
Getting Married?
Then come pickup
your free end rolls of
paper at the Wapako-
neta Daily News.
Works great for pack-
ing, covering tables,
drawing, and much
much more.
520 Industrial Dr.,
Wapak
419-738-2128
DAILY NEWS
W A P A K O N E T A
In a dog eat
dog world
is top dog!
Classifieds
Work!
Buy-Sell-Buy
Advertise Here!

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SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD •
SOLD
ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES AND HOUSEHOLD AUCTION
SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD • SOLD
Sat., March 22nd, 2014, 10:00 AM
Auglaize Co. Fairgrounds-Wapakoneta , Ohio
Consigners: Robin Rose-Shawnee, Diane Wieland-Wapakoneta, Pam Niemeyer-Lima, Mike Hoehn (Haney) - Ottoville
Antiques-Collectibles: Edison roll record phonograph, 36 record rolls ,Roseville, secretary, 4pc Shrimp forks-Holland, Milk bottles( Brown
dairy –Wapak, Kolter, Decker, Shelly, Eldora farms, Hefner Eldora, Hefner, Hefner & Sons, Equity ,White Mountain, Independent, Lincoln-Delphos,
Gribler-Van Wert, Kenton-Dunkirk Creamery Co.,) matchbook collection,1986” Reds “baseball,” Norman Rockwell” young girls diary, 1930’s stamp
album, antique doll ( leather body-ceramic head),walnut wash stand, “Sohio” toy trucks, Stiffel brass lamps, “Fisher-Price” little people castle-
airport-city and school, 1920’s license plates ,embossed bottles, brass hanging lights, vintage fans, 1949 “John Hancock” picture, Stroh’s beer
signs ,Beer stine collection, mirrored beer signs, personal dresser-Italy, Japanese coin collection, Crystal w silver tops salt & pepper shakers ( 4
sets, Waterford), knife-sword early 1900’s “India”, helmet (stamped late 1800’s), Havilland China set-#21261, Tiffany & Co.-ice bucket-matching
glasses – wine decanter-lead glass bowl-lead glass mugs,1940’s International silver tea pot-creamer-sugar, 8 Blue Willow divided plates, 2
“Neil House”pots, large footed berry bowl w/lid-5 matching berry bowls, silver and silver plated pcs, Heisey punch bowl and 12 cups, Havilland
chocolate pot w/6 cups, Havilland pancake warmer ,various etched glass pcs, Cartier Cordial glasses, ladder back chairs w/rush seats(2),Amethyst
etched pitcher, large cut glass biscuit jar,1970’s Havilland China book, 8pc “Wedgewood* USA –patent 61296-6pc plates ,mink coat ,Mahjongg
Ivory set late 1800’s, “Five little pepper’s and how they grew” x-mas 1914, “Pillsbury Dough Boy” 1971, Boston canning jars, Snow Crest bank
bottles, Ohio advertising pcs., “The Buckeye Machine Co”. Lima 1942, Ant. Oak frame mirror, “Marquis” by Waterford picture frame & vase,” David
Davison “ Lighthouse pict. , 1926”Chrysler” paper ad, “Sawyer” pictures, 1940’s” Sweetie Pie” Doll, wicker high chair, ”Sunny Tom” tomato can
wraps, crocks, “John Deere” items, old monopoly game, old books, mink stoles, insulators, “Edward Hopper “prints, “Chagall” peintures 1942-
1945, ballets program signed, North Atlantic Ocean framed map, primitive bench w/ meat grinder, oak library table, quilts, much much more…
Household and Misc. :Dining table w/six chairs, Twin bed 5pc suit,luggage set, office sullies, desk, sofa hide-a-bed, lamps end tables ,army
trunks, army field hospital cots, wood $ metal storage cabinets & trunks, solid Cherry drop leaf table w/6 chairs, fake trees, large cedar chest, Oak
corner chair, cut glass items, house hold items ,quilts ,recliner, clocks, TV trays, sweeper, tools, keyboard, Ect ,ect…
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Auction Conducted By : Reindel Auction Service
Mike Reindel Owner/Auctioneer 419-235-3607
Auctioneers: Mark Knoch, Matt Bowers, Apprentice Elaine Wehri
All Auctioneers Licensed and Bonded in the favor of the State of Ohio
Terms: Cash or check w/ proper ID
View Pictures @ auctionzip.com • Lunch Available
Will be running two rings (one ring will be gallery style) • Very nice clean Auction, Come and visit with Us
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
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