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Thursday, July 18, 2013

July 18, 2013

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DAILY NEWS
W A P A K O N E T A
SPORTS, 1B
ARIZONA BOUND
Local baseball product Brian
Garman headed for rehab
DOW JONES
15,470.52 +18.67
NASDAQ
3,610.00 +11.67
WHEAT
$6.37 -$0.04
CORN
$6.59 -$0.10
SOYBEANS
$15.92 -$0.02
NEW INJECTOR
Smith discusses OSU demonstrating new injector
AG., 4B
TRAILER STOLEN
Sheriff’s deputies investigative theft
STATE, 2A
VOLUME 108,
NUMBER 168
State/Region 2A
Records 3A
Opinion 4A
Pageant 6A
Sports 1B
Summer Swim 2B
Agriculture 4B
Comics 5B
Classifieds 6B
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A quirky eastern
South Dakota landmark dedicated to all
things corn is undergoing a multimillion-
dollar renovation, including new lit domes
resembling ears of corn, in an effort to draw in
more maize-curious visitors.
The Corn Palace bills itself as the world’s
only palace dedicated to the grain plant. New
murals using about 275,000 ears of corn of
various sizes and colors decorate the exterior
and interior of the sprawling building each
year in the small town of Mitchell.
State Rep. Jim Buchy, R-Greenville, has set
up an online legislative survey in an effort to
gain feedback from the residents of the 84th
Ohio House District regarding a variety of state
issues. The survey can be accessed at http://
tinyurl.com/BuchySurvey2013.
“This survey is part of my ongoing efforts
to gather opinions from the district,” said Rep.
Buchy. “Constituents really do drive public
policy, and hearing from you will ensure I
cast votes that best serve the interests of the
district.”
INDEX YOUR HOMETOWN BUCHY SURVEY ODDS & ENDS
See 2A
Best
Hometown
OHIO MAGAZINE’S
Staff photos/William Laney
Jocelyn Campbell wears her sash and holds flowers after being crowned Miss Summer Moon 2013
during Wednesday’s scholarship pageant. Salon Gegel, inset from top, earned first runner-up, Sid-
ney Nuss earned second runner-up and Karli Schneider earned third runner-up in the pageant.
Campbell crowned queen, Gegel retains
1st runner-up sash, Nuss, Schneider place
Royal blush
By WILLIAM LANEY
Managing Editor
As one of nine young wom-
en lef, this 2013 Wapakoneta
High School graduate could
not believe she heard her name
as Miss Summer Moon 2013.
As emcee Nick Earl read her
name her hands cupped her
face and tears welled up in her
eyes as Jocelyn Campbell tried
to absorb the news she would
be the
n e x t
reigning
q u e e n .
Dressed
in a
s h i m -
me r i ng
f l o o r -
l e n g t h
b l a c k
d r e s s ,
s h e
slowly took a step forward
and then fnally moved down
the row of girls so Miss Sum-
mer Moon 2012 Mindy Ke-
ifer could place the tiara on her
head and give her a bouquet of
fowers.
“I was so surprised because
all these girls are super awe-
some,” Campbell, 18, said as
she exchanged hugs and pleas-
See ROYAL, Page 6A
EMA director warns of exotic animals residing in the county
By MIKE BURKHOLDER
EL Managing Editor
ST. MARYS — Lions,
monkeys and pythons are
among some of the exotic
animals located through-
out county that are sub-
ject to new reporting laws
in response to an incident
in Zanesville in 2011.
Auglaize County
Emergency Management
Agency (EMA) Direc-
tor Troy Anderson gave a
rundown Wednesday of
some of the animals lo-
cated in the county while
addressing the St. Marys
Rotary. While the list is
long, Anderson stressed
it contained only the ani-
mals whose owners ap-
plied for a permit under a
new state law.
In response to the new
state law, Anderson creat-
ed a countywide response
team that would respond
to any animals releases or
escapes in the county. Te
team is made up of law
enforcement, frefghters,
a vet and members of the
See EXOTIC, Page 5A
County
plans
for fuel
upgrade
Soldier’s
dream
defending
country By KAREN KANTNER
Assistant Managing Editor
Auglaize County of -
cials are determining how
they can recoup costs to
fund up-
gradi ng
a fuel
complex
used by
m u l -
tiple of-
fces and
a g e n -
cies.
Auglaize County Engi-
neer Doug Reinhart said
a new fuel management
system is needed imme-
diately at an approximate
cost of $21,700, but he
is also looking into the
future with all seven fuel
dispensers expected to
need replaced in the next
10 years and another sof-
ware system afer that.
Te dispensers, frst in-
stalled 23 years ago, are
expected to cost $5,000
each to replace, for a total
cost of $55,000.
Reinhart said in de-
termining what type of
surcharge they may add
per gallon used by other
of ces and agencies, they
also would consider tack-
ing on 20 percent for un-
foreseen future expenses.
At an estimated sav-
ings of 20 cents per gal-
lon compared to retail,
the agencies and of ces
would still be purchasing
discounted gasoline and
have access to it 24-hours-
a-day even during inclem-
ent weather as the system
may be powered by a gen-
erator as needed.
“We are out there to
help people and that’s our
job,” Reinhart said. “We
have a service to provide.
Te botom line is we
See FUEL, Page 3A
By LANCE MIHM
Staff Writer
Te world has a way of twisting to-
gether the fates of people and sometimes
those twists and turns can turn cruel,
and even unbearable,
especially to friends
and family that lose a
loved one.
Teir paths crossed
with 25-year-old
Sonny Zimmerman,
a 2005 graduate of
Waynesfield-Goshen
High School, who died
Tuesday while serving
in the U.S. Army over seas.
Shortly before noon Wednesday,
U.S. Department of Defense of cials
announced Zimmerman died Tuesday,
July 16, in Mushaka, Afghanistan, of
wounds he sufered when his vehicle
was atacked by a rocket propelled gre-
nade.
He was assigned to the 1st Batalion,
506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade
Combat Team out of Fort Campbell, Ky.
Te unit is beter known as the Band of
Brothers.
As with most, the path that Zimmer-
man had taken to his untimely death
was not a straight road. While he had
dreamed of being in the military from a
young age, as he got older and entered
junior high his plans began to change.
“He kind of started talking about ca-
reers when he was in junior high and had
started making plans to go into graphic
design,” said Chris Zimmerman, Son-
ny’s father. “He was talking about going
to Bowling Green State University.”
Te frst of those interesting turns
happened shortly afer.
While Sonny was beginning his fresh-
man year at Waynesfeld-Goshen, four
passenger airliners were hijacked by 19
al-Qaida terrorists on Sept. 11, 2001 and
fown into buildings in suicide atacks.
Te planes were used as weapons as they
were fown into the World Trade Cen-
ter complex and the Pentagon, a fourth
plane, which had been targeted for the
Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.,
crashed into a feld in Pennsylvania afer
See DREAM, Page 5A
...WHERE IT PAYS TO
SHOP LOCAL FIRST
WAPAKONETA
Jocelyn Campbell
Reinhart
Zimmerman
STATE/REGION
2A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
A heat advisory will go into effect for the entire viewing area Thursday at noon with heat indices in the region
expected to top out at and above 100 degrees! Actual temperatures will be in the low 90s so remember to drink
plenty of fluids through the day. Friday will be the last hot and humid day in the region before a cold front moves
through Friday night bringing showers and thunderstorms to the region for the first half of Saturday.
Vern Doenges compiles this daily historical
column for the Wapakoneta Daily News.
Looking Back
Through the pages of the
Wapakoneta Daily News
75 years ago
July 18, 1938
Burlington, WI: The explanation offered by Doug-
las Corrigan after he landed his trans-Atlantic plane
at Dublin, Ireland, “by mistake” has won him a life
membership in the famed Burlington Liars Club.
Corrigan said after his daring hop from New York
that he really thought he was flying to Los Angeles.
Anyone who can tell a story like that and still keep
a straight face, Liars Club President OC Hulett said
today, “is entitled to a life membership in our orga-
nization. I’d sure like to shake Corrigan’s hand.”
Six boys from Auglaize County have left for
enlistment in Civilian Conservation Camps in the
northwestern part of the states. Those going were
Roy Rains, Austin Harrison and Charles Coil of
Wapakoneta; James Douglas of Wayne Town-
ship; Fred Fannon of St. Marys; and John Steele of
Waynesfield.
AH Slusher, county relief agent, announced today
11,000 pounds of potatoes and 50 cases of canned
peas had been received for distribution to those on
relief. Persons calling for the merchandise are asked
to take their own containers.
50 years ago
July 18. 1963
Hubert Zimmerman, Wapakoneta sports promot-
er for 30 years, related his experiences in the sports
world. Remember the kid ball teams on North Black-
hoof Street? This was the start of boys teams in
the city. The ball diamond was located at the corner
location of the Veteran’s Court. The League was
open to all boys through 15 years ago age. It got to
be such a big thing I moved play to Harmon Field.
At that time there were more than enough boys for
four teams. The probate judge, ministers and priest
would take turns in giving the boys a talk about
good sportsmanship. Judge Dan McKeever was
secretary. Balls and bats were furnished to all the
boys. To finance this, basketball games were pro-
moted, the profits all going for equipment. Where
are these boys today? I would appreciate hearing
of their whereabouts. Remember when Wapako-
neta had two baseball teams? Once was known as
Wapak Reds, one was Wapak National. Some of the
players were Lefty Houts, Fred Bubp, Urb Weimert,
Cass Kohler, Ed Garrett, Scotty Cleaves, and Buck
Dardio. Remember Kolter Park? It had a fence and
grandstand, the whole works.
25 years ago
July 19, 1988
The first place team in the Ladies stagette at
the Wapakoneta Country Club included Mary Kent,
Lenore Eddington, Marge Taylor and Jackie McCor-
mick. The ladies shot a team score of 70 for the 18
holes. The four ladies who finished in second place
were Jan Berg, Nan McCord, Barb Stettler and Mari-
lyn Shelby with a finish of 72. This group carded an
18-hole 75, which was good enough for third place
in the stagette. The group was composed for Pat
Katterhenry, Priscilla Elshire, Sharon Kohlresiser
and Alice Wintzer.
The fun of the Wapakoneta Fun Days concluded
for another year Saturday afternoon as rafts floated
down the Auglaize River in the Great River Raft
Race. Winner of the race was Bedrock Beds, with
the Wapakoneta Light Department finishing second.
Century 21 finished third, Wapakoneta Daily News
fourth and Wapak Pharmacy fifth. Each of these
finishers received a trophy for their accomplish-
ments. In addition to the race, there were three
other categories in which rafts were judged. The
winner of the longest raft was the Wapakoneta Daily
New; Century 21 won for the most creative raft; and
Bedrock Beds for the fastest raft. Each of these win-
ners received $100. Bedrock Beds also received a
trophy for the family division of competition.
The Voice of Auglaize County Since 1905
520 Industrial Drive, Wapakoneta, OH 45895
The Wapakoneta Daily News is open
Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
General business telephone number: (419) 738-2128
Fax number: (419) 738-5352
Publisher Deb Zwez:
(419) 739-3504 - publisher@wapakwdn.com
Managing Editor William Laney:
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Production Manager Nina Laney:
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Circulation Department Cotie Ibarra:
(419) 739-3501 - circulation@wapakwdn.com
Press Supervisor Mark Croy:
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Business Manager Melissa Bartlett:
(419) 739-3503 - mbartlett@wapakwdn.com
After hours news tips:
Please call (419) 739-3515 and leave a message.
Published Monday-Friday evenings and Saturday morning, except holidays,
by Horizon Ohio Publications Inc. ID No. 665840
The publisher reserves the right to reject,
edit or cancel any advertising at any time without liability.
Yearly subscription rates: Carrier delivery, $126;
Motor Route, $135.20; Mail, $185; News stand, 75 cents
Periodicals Postage Paid, Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Postmaster: Send address changes to
Wapakoneta Daily News,
520 Industrial, Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
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7-Day
Forecast
courtesy of
meteorologist Brian
Schroeder and the
WLIO weather team
Trailer stolen from barn
By KAREN KANTNER
Assistant Managing Editor
A trailer was report-
ed stolen from a barn at
04692 State Route 219,
St. Marys.
Vicki Shively, 42, who
rents a residence on the
property from her aunt,
reported the thef at noon
Monday. She said the
trailer was taken afer 11
a.m. Friday, according to
a report from a deputy
with the Auglaize County
Sherif’s Of ce.
Shively said the trailer
was taken from a barn
with no force required to
gain access to it. A slid-
ing door on the barn was
found open. A weed eater
and bucket of oil were
moved to get the trailer
out of the barn.
Te trailer belongs to
Shively’s aunt, who lives
in Nebraska, and owns the
property on Ohio 219.
Te trailer is described
as a small utility trailer
that came with a Crafs-
man riding lawn mower.
It was used to haul sticks
and other items.
Te trailer was black
metal with white rims.
Shively said to her
knowledge no one had
asked to use the trailer.
Auglaize County
Sherif’s Of ce
• Lynn Werling, 57,
11977 Glynwood Road,
Wapakoneta, reported a
receiving a scam phone
call at 6:25 p.m. Monday.
According to the re-
port:
Werling said he re-
See BARN, Page 6B
Brown backs brownfields bill
By WILLIAM LANEY
Managing Editor
While no brownfelds sites exist
in Auglaize County, legislation co-
sponsored by Democratic U.S. Sen.
Sherrod Brown would maintain
existing federal funding levels un-
til 2016 and provide new tools for
communities working to redevelop
these sites.
“Ohio brownsfelds — those
properties that have been lef be-
hind afer a building or a factory has
been demolished
or abandoned —
can be found in
big cities or small
towns all across
the state,” Brown
said Wednesday in
a media telecon-
ference. “Tese
brownfelds do
not belong in neighborhoods where
children walk to school, they don’t
belong in communities where busi-
nesses seek new customers, but es-
timates say there are literally thou-
sands of these brownfelds in our
state.
“Te Brownfelds Utilization, In-
vestment, and Local Development,
or BUILD, Act would overhaul
EPA’s brownfelds program,” the se-
nior senator said. “Te BUILD Act
would frst increase clean-up grants
and more than double the funding
ceiling on remediation grants. We
know by increasing fexibility then
See BROWN, Page 6B
Woman
claims
being hit,
choked
By KAREN KANTNER
Assistant Managing Editor
Wapakoneta Police
Department of cers were
called to the 300 block
of Jackson Street early
Wednesday morning afer
a woman claimed her f-
ancé hit and atempted to
choke her.
Te 35-year-old wom-
an said she was walking
home from Lulu’s 113,
113 E. Auglaize St., with
her 38-year-old fancé
when he became violent
for an unknown reason at
2:15 a.m., Clerk Denise
Kohler said.
When the man was
contacted at the residence
he shares with the woman
in the 300 block of Glyn-
wood Road, he said noth-
ing happened and they
just walked home, accord-
ing to an of cer’s report.
Te woman did not
want to pursue charges
from the alleged domes-
tic violence. She did not
sufer any injuries, Kohler
said.
She said alcohol was a
factor in the incident.
Wapakoneta
Police Department
• An on-duty detective
came across James Valen-
tine Jr., 22, 201 Logan St.,
Wapakoneta, at 1:35 p.m.
Tuesday at the intersec-
tion of Auglaize and Perry
streets.
According to the re-
port:
Te detective knew
Valentine was wanted on
an active arrest warrant.
He was arrested and
taken to court, where he
was released on an own
recognizance bond.
• Two vehicles sus-
tained minor damage
and no one was injured
See CHOKED, Page 6B
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Box Of ce Opens
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Movies begin at dark
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Sat. & Sun. 1:30 pm
Admission $4.50
Playing
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Rated PG-13
Brown
Group hug
Staff photo/William Laney
All 12 contestants in the Miss Summer Moon 2013 scholarship pageant hug
at the end of the event. More Summer Moon Fest events are scheduled today
such as the bed races and bands playing into the night. Former Ohio State
Buckeyes head coach Earle Bruce will also be in Wapakoneta today.
have to have this system.”
“But if any thing else
messes up, we are out of
business,” Chief Deputy
Engineer Gary Kuck said.
In 2012, 152,000 gal-
lons of gasoline and die-
sel fuel were dispensed
through the county’s fuel
complex to the 17 govern-
ment agencies and of ces
who use it. Te Engineer’s
Of ce used 76,000 gal-
lons, with the next two
biggest users being the
Sherif’s Of ce at 28,000
gallons and the Council
on Aging at 22,000 gal-
lons.
“When we got into this
in 1990, we anticipated
that the county engineer
would use two-thirds of
the fuel and everyone else
one-third, but the use has
grown and it is about 50
percent us and 50 percent
them now,” Reinhart said.
Te system was in-
stalled to replace steel
tanks and equipment put
in at the complex in 1969
to meet new state rules
and regulations. Along
with new dual-walled f-
berglass tanks, a tracking
system was put in at the
complex to track usage by
person, vehicle and mile-
age. Also included was 12
diferent buried lines to
monitor possible contam-
ination. Te total cost was
$100,000.
Commissioners assist-
ed the Engineer’s Of ce
last year in paying $20,000
needed to rebuild sealed
caps to keep the elements
out of the system.
“Te 10- to 12-year-old
computer system has to
be upgraded, but we need
to fgure out how we are
going to be paid for that,”
Reinhart said. “Hopefully
we can iron out how fund-
ing will be collected and
do it very soon. I am not
comfortable waiting any
longer.”
Reinhart questioned
Auditor Janet Schuler
about how he could es-
tablish an account to set
aside money to make the
improvements and the
state told her such a fund
could not be established
before the expense was
incurred.
Schuler said the of-
fces and agencies would
have to pay back the cost
through surcharges afer
the work had been done,
not before.
Te commissioners,
who also have stake in the
fuel complex, are working
with Reinhart to fnd an-
other option so that some
money could be set aside
for future anticipated
costs of updating the sys-
tem.
“I don’t understand
their thinking, why I can’t
build up an account for
anticipated costs,” Rein-
hart said of the state. “It
should be a heck of a lot
simpler and I don’t want
to go into debt or take
out loans to pay for this.
I would like to fnd a way
to build this into the bud-
get.”
Reinhart said he hoped
Schuler could help them
fnd the best way to do it.
For now, the plan is to
begin adding a surcharge
per gallon used on Jan.
1. What that surcharge
may be is still being deter-
mined, but Reinhart said
it could be several cents
per gallon and it would be
based on usage.
Shelby County collects
5 cents per gallon as part
of a similar system set up
there.
“We need to try to
move forward,” Com-
missioner Doug Spencer
said of the need to begin
adding a surcharge to the
price per gallon next year.
“Tere has never been
a surcharge before, but
we need to fnd a way to
pay for these updates,”
Reinhart said, clarifying
that the charge would be
based on usage.
He said he didn’t want
to start charging the of-
fces and agencies before
then so they wouldn’t
have any unexpected bills
and would be beter able
to account for the costs in
their budgets.
“Everyone could help
pay a litle per year, a litle
per month,” Reinhart said.
“I do not want to surprise
people who are on a fxed
budget.”
Te county engineer
said he planned to have
an estimate of anticipated
annual costs based on us-
age in 2013 to each of ce
and agency by November,
in time to determine their
budgets for next year.
“I would like to fnd a
way to have cash on hand
in something set up like
savings account to pay
for improvements as they
need to be made,” Rein-
hart said.
He also inquired about
seting money aside in
the county’s permanent
improvement fund or
borrowing from the com-
missioners’s capital im-
provement fund and re-
imbursing them for costs
at the jointly owned com-
plex.
Schuler planned to re-
search diferent options
and get back to Reinhart
about how he needs to
proceed.
Commissioner John
Bergman agreed that they
would fnd a way to get it
done.
RECORDS
Page 3A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
Agenda
Today: The Auglaize
County Veterans Service
Commission is scheduled
to meet at 5 p.m. at the Vet-
erans Service Commission
Office, 209 S. Blackhoof St.,
Wapakoneta.
• Buckland Village Council
meets at 6:30 p.m. in the
Buckland Community Build-
ing
• The Auglaize County
Board of Education is sched-
uled to meet at 7 p.m. in the
Auglaize County Educational
Service Center, 1045 Dear-
baugh St., Wapakoneta.
Monday: The Waynesfield
Village Council is scheduled
to meet at 7:30 p.m. in the
village office at 300 N. West-
minster St.
Tuesday: The Wapakoneta
Board of Education meets at
6 p.m. at the Gardenia office.
Wednesday: The Botkins
School District Board of
Education is scheduled to
meet at 7 p.m. in the school
library, 208 N. Sycamore
Ave., Botkins.
• The Union Township
Zoning Commission is
scheduled to meet at 8 p.m.
at the township facility in
Uniopolis.
Thursday: The Botkins Vil-
lage Council Safety Commit-
tee is scheduled to meet at 6
p.m. in its council chambers,
111 E. Lynn St., Botkins.
• Buckland Village Council
meets at 6:30 p.m. in the
Buckland Community Build-
ing.
• The Botkins Village
Council is scheduled to
meet at 7 p.m. in its council
chambers, 111 E. Lynn St.,
Botkins.
• The Botkins Village
Council Finance Committee is
scheduled to meet imme-
diately following the village
council meeting in its council
chambers, 111 E. Lynn St.,
Botkins.
Aug. 5: The Uniopolis
Village Council meets at 7
p.m. at council chambers in
Uniopolis.
he Waynesfield-Goshen
Board of Education is sched-
uled to meet at 7 p.m. in the
board room at the district
office.
• The Wapakoneta City
Council is scheduled to meet
at 7:30 p.m. at the Wapa-
koneta City Administration
Building, 701 Parlette Court.
• The Salem Township
Board of Trustees meets at 8
p.m. in the township building
in Kossuth.
Aug. 6: The Botkins
Village Council Service
Committee is scheduled to
meet at 7 p.m. in council
chambers, 111 E. Lynn St.,
Botkins.
• The Pusheta Township
Board of Trustees meets at 7
p.m. at the township house
in Freyburg.
Here are the Ohio Lottery
selections for Wednesday:
Mega Millions 7/16
10-14-21-40-53
Mega Ball: 20
Megaplier: 2
Powerball 7/17
1-22-34-38-42
Powerball: 17
Pick 3 Numbers 7/17
6-7-2 (day)
3-9-7 (night)
Pick 4 Numbers 7/17
3-6-1-6 (day)
1-6-3-4 (night)
Pick 5 Numbers 7/17
0-4-0-9-6 (day)
6-4-8-8-9 (night)
Rolling Cash 5 7/17
6-14-16-30-36
Classic Lotto 7/17
7-12-17-27-36-44
Kicker:
0-0-0-2-2-9
The Mega Millions jack-
pot is $12 million.
The Powerball jackpot is
$141 million.
The Rolling Cash 5
jackpot is $244,000.
The Classic Lotto jack-
pot is $41 million.
Lottery
ST. RITA’S
MEDICAL CENTER
Births
Sara and Craig Topp, of
New Bremen, a son born
Tuesday, July 16, 2013
Casey Hess and Jared
Kohnen, of St. Marys, a
daughter born Wdnesday,
July 17, 2013
Hospital
In brief
MOOREFIELD TOWN-
SHIP (AP) — A veteran
sheriff’s deputy in a west-
ern Ohio county is facing
charges associated with
producing child pornogra-
phy and having sex with a
minor.
The Dayton Daily News
reports that 30-year-old
Dustin William Hensley,
a deputy with the Clark
County Sheriff’s Office,
was arrested Tuesday and
charged with one count of
producing child pornog-
raphy.
FBI agents and sheriff’s
deputies raided Hensley’s
home last week. Authori-
ties have not said what
was found at the house.
Clark County Prosecu-
tor Andy Wilson told the
newspaper on Wednesday
that his office will refrain
from pursuing charges
of sexual battery and
unlawful sex with a minor
against Hensley until fed-
eral court action. Hensley
allegedly had sex with a
male under the age of 16.
URBANA (AP) — The
saying goes that it’s better
late than never.
Thus, a person claiming
to be a slow reader has re-
turned a book that was 41
years overdue to a western
Ohio public library.
BRIGHTEN
YOUR SMILE!
Summer Special
Professional
Tooth Whitening
$
99
00
Reg $300
Offer Good Thru 9/1/13
809 Redskin Trail
Wapakoneta
419-738-2426
Kenneth J. Jackson,
DDS
www.AuglaizeFamilyDental.com
$
99
00
Death Notices
Staff Sgt. Sonny Zimmerman, 25
Staf Sergeant Sonny
C. Zimmerman, 25, of
Waynesfeld, was killed in
action Tuesday, July 16,
2013, in Afghanistan.
Condolences can be
expressed at armentrout-
funeralhome.com.
Other arrangements
are incomplete at Armen-
trout Funeral Home in
Waynesfeld.
Debra Hague, 55
Debra K. Hague, 55,
of St. Johns, died at 1:15
a.m. Tursday, July 18,
2013, at St. Rita’s Medical
Center in Lima.
Arrangements are in-
complete at the Baylif
& Eley Funeral Home in
Wapakoneta.
Fuel From Page 1A
Karen Kantner
Asst. Managing Editor
419-739-3517
reporter2@wapakwdn.com
Relief from heat
on the horizon
NEW YORK (AP) —
Cooler temperatures are
within sight but likely not
soon enough and cool
enough for a large swath
of the country hit with
dangerously high tem-
peratures for days as the
largest heat wave of the
summer failed to budge
from South Dakota to
Massachusets.
Te relief is expected
to begin arriving Turs-
day in some regions of
the country as a cold front
drops south from Canada.
But it is not soon enough
for others. New York City,
for instance, is bracing for
another day of tempera-
tures in the high 90s.
Cooler tempera-
tures are likely to sweep
through the Midwest
and into the Mid-Atlantic
and Northeast regions by
Saturday. Tey might be
accompanied by severe
thunderstorms.
Te largest heat wave of
the summer has stagnated
over large regions, bring-
ing sizzling temperatures
and litle hope of relief
without rain, a growing
possibility for some hard-
hit areas as the weekend
approaches.
Most states in the U.S.
had at least one region
where the temperature hit
90 degrees Wednesday,
according to the National
Weather Service, though
the worst heat was in the
Midwest to Northeast.
Humid air just made it all
feel worse, with heat in-
dexes in some places over
100.
It was hot enough to
buckle highway pave-
ment in several states.
Firefghters in Indianapo-
lis evacuated 300 people
from a senior living com-
munity afer a power out-
age knocked out the air
conditioning. Te state
of Illinois opened cooling
centers.
Senators ready to
restore lower rates
WASHINGTON (AP)
— Senators are ready to
ofer students a beter
deal on their college loans
this fall, but future classes
could see higher interest
rates.
Te Senate could vote
as early as Tursday on a
bipartisan compromise
that heads of a costly in-
crease for returning stu-
dents. Te compromise
could be a good deal for
students through the
2015 academic year, but
then interest rates are
expected to climb above
where they were when
students lef campus this
spring.
Under the deal, all
undergraduates this fall
would borrow at 3.85 per-
cent interest rates. Gradu-
ate students would have
access to loans at 5.4 per-
cent.
Falling in (and out of)
love with Libor
Last week it was announced that
the British Bankers’ Association had
sold Libor to NYSE Euronext, the
company that
operates the
New York Stock
Exchange.
Te news
brought a lump
to my throat.
Until 2008, I
was painfully ig-
norant of Libor.
Ten suddenly,
as the world
economy was
brought to its knees by the subprime
mortgage crisis, I realized why I wasn’t
cruising the Greek islands in my yacht.
I fgured that if I said “Libor” ofen
enough, someone might give me a
yacht. I would walk around the of ce
saying things like, “Libor is up 10
basis points” or “Commercial paper is
frozen. Libor’s too high.”
I had only the vaguest notion of
what any of this meant, but one thing
the newspaper business teaches you: If
you can just pick up the jargon, every-
thing else comes easy.
For a while I was capitalizing
LIBOR, because it’s an acronym. It
stands for London Interbank Ofered
Rate. But all your big-shot fnancial
publications were going with proper-
name Libor.
I was charmed by the notion that
promptly at 11 a.m. each weekday,
a dozen bankers in black suits and
bowler hats, like that guy in “Mary
Poppins,” would march out of their
of ces in the city of London carrying
umbrellas. Tey would meet for tea
and decide how much to charge each
other to borrow money.
Banks being (in those days) the
safest possible customers, this would
become the basic measurement of
soundness of the world fnancial sys-
tem. If they thought it was sound, they
would set a low Libor rate.
If they were nervous, Libor would
go up. Libor became the benchmark
for everything.
Tat is if you consider hundreds of
trillion dollars everything.
If the bank-to-bank Libor rate on
Tuesday was 3 percent, then the bank-
to-business rate that day might be 3.5
percent.
And the credit-card-to-shady-cus-
tomer rate that day might be 20.5 per-
cent. Everything was indexed to Libor.
Student loans. Car loans. Municipal
bonds. Huge international develop-
ment projects. Everything.
In my view, these 12 bankers would
be paragons of probity because, afer
all, this was London and the world
needed proper standards.
I believed in them like I believed in
the clock at the Royal Observatory in
Greenwich. If the Royal astronomers
said it was 12 noon Greenwich Mean
Time, it was by-God noon.
It turned out Libor wasn’t quite
that simple. In the frst place, there are
dozens of diferent Libors, all set by
diferent panels of bankers in diferent
currencies for diferent maturity peri-
ods. You can get your overnight dollar
Libor or your three-month yen Libor.
Te lords of the British Bankers’ As-
sociation would throw out the high
and low quotes and setle on the mean
rate of the ones in the middle. Tey
met by phone or email and didn’t wear
bowler hats.
Also, some of them were crooks.
Te whole thing was rigged. Te
frst of cial hint came in April 2008
when the Wall Street Journal reported
that a whistle-blower at Barclay’s Bank
had told the New York Fed that Bar-
clay’s wasn’t posting an honest Libor
rate.
Te temptation to cheat was enor-
mous. A move of 50 basis points (half
a percent) up or down could dramati-
cally afect a bank’s loan position on
any given day. Billions of dollars could
be made or lost.
Naturally, as soon as Timothy
Geithner, then the president of the
New York Fed and later treasury
secretary, heard the news, he raised
an alarm. Never mind the possible
panic in the markets, he said, everyone
deserves to know.
No, just kidding. He quietly in-
formed British banking of cials that
they might have a problem. Te Brits
kept it under their hats (not bowlers)
and sent the equivalent of a Very Stern
Note to member banks.
By 2011 the scandal was in full
fower. Emails showed traders had
been angling for, and geting, favorable
Libor positions.
Te Justice Department opened
a criminal investigation. Britain’s
Financial Services Authority had its
own investigation going, as did other
governments. Municipal and state gov-
ernments, which had been ripped of
on bond rates, went ballistic. Nearly
everyone who had a loan for anything
was afected.
Now, because nobody really trusts
Libor any more, the Brits have sold the
right to run it to Americans (like we
don’t have any scam artists), though
British authorities will oversee it
(since they did such a fne job before).
NYSE Euronext is being acquired
by IntercontinentalExchange of At-
lanta for $8.3 billion.
Te Atlanta frm runs exchanges
that trade fnancial derivatives, which
are made-up instruments worth only
what people think they’re worth, tied
to the squishy number called Libor.
No confict of interest there. Te
world’s central banks ought to be set-
ting that number.
Te nice thing about the Libor
scandal is that hundreds of sleazy
bankers went to prison.
No, that’s ridiculous. Banks paid
billion-dollar criminal fnes, and a few
big-shots had to resign. If you want to
go to prison, rip of a 7-Eleven.
If you want to sail the Greek isles
in your yacht, learn about Libor when
you’re young.
Kevin Horrigan
with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Local editorial
Columnist opinions
Thought for the day
“I’m nuts and I know it. But so
long as I make’em laugh, they ain’t
going to lock me up.”
— Red Skelton
(1913-1997)
Protect Lima’s
neighborhoods
Foxhoven
should be
St. Marys SSD
L
ast week I visited Lima and saw
frsthand the good work that
Mayor Dave Berger is doing
to keep his community safe. I joined
Berger, Allen County Commissioner
Cory Noonan, and local of cials as an
abandoned house on Calumet Street
was demolished afer siting vacant for
fve years and becoming an eyesore to
area residents and a threat to surround-
ing home values.
Newspapers across the country have
chronicled the crimes that occur when
homes are vacated, abandoned and lef
empty for criminals to use.
Tese challenges aren’t limited to the
toughest neighborhoods of some far
away city. Tey are also here in northern
Ohio — stretching from streets in the
Mahoning Valley to neighborhoods in
Cleveland and even in Lima. Te city
of Cleveland estimates that more than
15,000 area homes are vacant, more
than half of which are condemned and
awaiting demolition. Lima has demol-
ished nearly 250 homes, with nearly
1,000 still on the waiting list.
Similar situations are occurring all
over Ohio in communities both large
and small.
Abandoned and blighted structures
are a major public safety issue. Tese are
houses that no one will ever live in again,
they have no historical signifcance
whatsoever, and they do only harm to
the communities in which they sit. Tens
of thousands of vacant homes dot the
streets of our cities, becoming magnets
for illicit activity including drug use,
rape, gang activity and murder. Aban-
doned structures also severely afect the
housing values of other homes on that
street.
For neighboring homes that are
still occupied, this can mean that up to
75 percent of their home value is lost
because of nearby houses becoming
vacant, creating a downward spiral that
quickly sends struggling neighborhoods
downhill.
Municipalities and local land banks
have worked collaboratively to tackle the
growing threat that vacant properties
pose to the public safety and economic
well-being of our communities. How-
ever, with municipal budgets already
stretched, there is litle money available
to tackle this problem. In response to
concerns raised by local mayors and
community groups, I introduced the
Neighborhood Safety Act, which would
allow communities to tap into additional
funds to demolish vacant structures.
Tis bill has broad bipartisan support
in the U.S. House.
Tis bill simply allows the Hard-
est Hit Fund to be used to demolish
blighted structures. Te bill does not
give Washington the power to mandate
what amount can be used for demoli-
tion. Rather, it merely makes demolition
an allowable use of these funds and gives
states the fexibility to decide if they
want to use some funds for this impor-
tant purpose.
I do not believe that demolishing
homes will solve all of our problems,
nor do I believe that all of these funds
should be used for demolition, as some
have suggested. I agree with my col-
league, Sen. Sherrod Brown, and com-
munity groups that some of these funds
should be used to help struggling home-
owners remain in their homes. Tere is a
balance between demolishing properties
and aiding struggling homeowners, and
I support both goals.
During a recent visit to the Husky
Plant in Lima, I saw frsthand a commu-
nity that is poised to thrive. But in order
for Lima and other cities around Ohio
to grow, the people of our state need
leaders who are willing to tackle the
problems that are holding our commu-
nities back. Tis is one of those prob-
lems. But unlike so many we face, the
solution has strong bipartisan support
from policymakers across the spectrum.
It’s time to take action, before more of
our neighborhoods fall victim to the
blight of abandoned homes.
S
t. Marys City Council mem-
bers have permited partisan
politics to invade a local deci-
sion regarding hiring
Greg Foxhoven as
their new safety-
service director —
using residency and
professional engi-
neer requirements
as their crutch.
Foxhoven was se-
lected by a third party entity, contracted
to evaluate the candidates for the of ce,
as the best person for the job.
Mayor Pat McGowan hired the frm so
councilors could not point the fnger at
him as selecting a crony or hiring some-
one as a political favor.
McGowan also went out of his way
to permit councilors to have a say in the
hiring of the safety-service director or
taking the interim tag of of Foxhoven’s
title. Foxhoven, who served years as the
police chief, accepted the position of
safety-service
director on an
interim basis.
In a split
vote, one
councilor
used the fact
he lived a
mile outside
the city limits
and the fact
he does not
possess a
professional
engineering
degree as
reasons for
not approv-
ing Foxhoven
as the new
safety-service
director.
While the
city can insti-
tute residency
require-
ments on the
safety-service
director, cities
can relax them a bit to enable a person to
live immediate outside the area. Te state
follows a state Supreme Court ruling that
fremen and police of cers, including
the police chief, can live anywhere in the
county they work as well as any adjoining
county. Tis net may be too big, Fox-
hoven lives 1 mile outside of the city of
St. Marys corporation limits.
As far as the question of being a
professional engineer, this requirement is
less needed now then in years past.
Te safety-service director, nor the
city, wants to assume the responsibility
or have the director devote that much
time to the position. It is beter to let a
professional engineering frm write of on
building projects and assume the liability.
Another problem is this appointment
should be McGowan’s – and McGowan’s
alone since the safety-service director
works for him.
Council may control the purse strings
for this position, the safety-service direc-
tor ultimately answers to the mayor,
while he works with city council.
Another search —which would be the
fourth in two years — is likely to send
up red fags to possible candidates of St.
Marys being a problem community.
Te safety-service director is more
about managing staf then where a
person lives or what degrees he holds.
Foxhoven has proven his skills as a man-
ager of staf — frst at the police depart-
ment and later as interim safety-service
director.
He has the backing of McGowan and
even City Law Director Kraig Nobel
came to his defense.
Te time has come for St. Marys City
Council members to reconsider their
earlier decision and appoint Foxhoven as
the new safety-service director.
POINTS TO
PONDER
POINT 1 — St. Marys
Mayor Pat McGowan
hired an outside firm to
evaluate safety-service
director candidates and
Greg Foxhoven got the
nod.
POINT 2 — Councilors
are playing politics with
the pick and should
give the job who has
earned their trust first
as police chief and now
as interim SSD.
POINT 3 — Foxhoven
has the support of the
people and city law
director — the time is
now for council to back
him.
OPINION
Page 4A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
Publisher: Deb Zwez Managing Editor: William Laney
WILLIAM
LANEY
In Garvin’s Opinion...
But it won’t do for Congress
and its minions, who are now in
search of relief from the mess
they’ve created for themselves.
Rob
Portman
U.S. senator
Republican from Ohio
Rodney Metz
Wapakoneta Mayor
701 Parlette Court
Wapakoneta, Ohio
421 Hoopengarner St.
Wapakoneta, Ohio
419-738-3111
419-739-2007
Steve Henderson
President of Council
701 Parlette Court
Wapakoneta, Ohio
1311 Lincoln Ave.
Wapakoneta, Ohio
419-738-6999
Jim Neumeier
1st Ward Councilor
708 W. Auglaize St.
419-738-4338
Dan Lee
2nd Ward Councilor
1004 Cherokee Crossing
419-738-3759
Bonnie Wurst
3rd Ward Councilor
205 E. Benton St.
419-738-5370
Chad Doll
4th Ward Councilor
713 W. Auglaize St.
419-738-6180
Tom Finkelmeier Jr.
Councilor-at-large
1217 Oakridge Court
419-739-7530
Dan Graf
Councilor-at-large
503 W. Auglaize St.
419-738-9437
Randy Fisher
Councilor-at-large
1017 Holley St.
419-235-5028
Write your legislators
Freedom of Speech: Reader Opinions and Other Views
KEVIN
HORRIGAN
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Exotic From Page 1A
media.
“We’ve asked the
dangerous, wild animal
owner to join,” Anderson
said. “Somebody who has
some knowledge of wild
animals, because I have
none, to sit on here and
give me some advice on if
we have to capture an ani-
mals, how do we do that.”
Anderson touched
upon some of the 23 spe-
cies of exotic animals — 
as defned by the state of
Ohio — that are found in
the county. Again, Ander-
son stressed the list only
included those owners
who applied for a permit
to keep the animal — at
a cost starting at $150 per
permit per animal.
“We have American al-
ligators — fve of them,”
Anderson said. “We have
lemurs, the capuchin
monkeys, the black bears
— we have numerous
black bears.”
Anderson said a prop-
erty owner south of St.
Marys has a black bear
that he wrestles. Tere
also are quiet a few Ca-
nadian lynx. Cougars,
mountain lions and grey
wolves also are in abun-
dance in Auglaize County.
Tere also are lions in the
eastern side of the county.
“I can reach down and
pick the fence up, lif it up
and crawl underneath it,”
Anderson said of the cage
the lions are kept in.
Tracking exotic snakes
in the county can be more
dif cult than larger ani-
mals.
Anderson said he has
heard rumors of someone
near St. Marys who has a
garage full of snakes kept
in aquariums.
“I would be interested
to see what those snakes
are,” Anderson said. “I
can’t imagine you just
have a garter snake or a
black snake. Usually they
have their pythons or ana-
condas — hopefully there
aren’t any timber ratlers.”
Anderson expressed
some concerns regarding
the permiting process.
It could become more f-
nancially advantageous to
simply release the animals
instead of obtaining the
necessary permit and mi-
crochip.
“We will have some is-
sues out of this,” Anderson
said. “My concern is once
we start puting mandates
on here, once they start
hiting these guys with the
permit and microchip, I
have a tendency to believe
that they will turn them
loose, especially with the
snakes.”
Te animals also could
pose a danger to frst
responders. If a frst re-
sponder arrives on the
scene of an emergency
and he or she is unaware
of the exotic animals at
the residence, that could
put them at risk for injury
or death. Mercer, Shel-
by, Darke and Van Wert
counties has no wild ani-
mals reported.
Anderson said he plans
to ask the state to provide
a breakdown of the ani-
mals located within mu-
nicipalities so those agen-
cies are aware of the exotic
animals located within its
borders as well as give of-
fcials a chance to develop
zoning regulations if nec-
essary. He also plans to
make the list available to
the public in the future.
“Tat list could be
given to council and they
could do with it whatever
they want,” Anderson
said. “As far as I am aware
of, there are no zoning
rules for anybody that says
you cannot have a bear in
town or in the village. Tat
might be something that
might have to be looked at
down the road.”
State of cials enacted
more provisions to the
law in June. Owners will
have to pass background
checks, pay permit fees,
obtain liability insurance
or surety bonds and show
inspectors they can prop-
erly contain their animals.
Ohio of cials could seize
the animals if owners are
found housing them with-
out a permit. Te new law
took efect in September
2012, although some pro-
visions have yet to kick in.
Tose include the permit
process that goes into
place in October.
Under that process,
owners who want to keep
their animals must obtain
new state-issued permits
by Jan. 1. Te law exempts
sanctuaries, research in-
stitutions and facilities
accredited by the two na-
tional zoo groups.
Te Associated Press
contributed to this report.
5A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
Dream From Page 1A
The Associated Press
Today is Thursday, July 18, the 199th day of 2013. There
are 166 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On July 18, 1863, during the Civil War, Union troops
spearheaded by the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry,
made up of black soldiers, charged Confederate-held Fort
Wagner on Morris Island, S.C. The Confederates were able
to repel the Northerners, who suffered heavy losses; the
54th’s commander, Col. Robert Gould Shaw, was among
those who were killed.
On this date:
In A.D. 64, the Great Fire of Rome began.
In 1792, American naval hero John Paul Jones died in
Paris at age 45.
In 1872, Britain enacted voting by secret ballot.
In 1932, the United States and Canada signed a treaty to
develop the St. Lawrence Seaway.
In 1940, the Democratic National Convention at Chicago
Stadium nominated President Franklin D. Roosevelt for an
unprecedented third term in office.
In 1947, President Harry S. Truman signed a Presiden-
tial Succession Act, which placed the speaker of the House
and the Senate president pro tempore next in the line of
succession after the vice president.
In 1969, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., left a party
on Chappaquiddick Island near Martha’s Vineyard with
Mary Jo Kopechne, 28; some time later, Kennedy’s car went
off a bridge into the water.
In 1976, at the Montreal Olympics, Romanian gymnast
Nadia Comaneci received the first-ever perfect score of 10
with her routine on uneven parallel bars. (Comaneci would
go on to receive six more 10s at Montreal.)
In 1984, gunman James Huberty opened fire at a
McDonald’s fast food restaurant in San Ysidro, Calif., kill-
ing 21 people before being shot dead by police. Walter F.
Mondale won the Democratic presidential nomination in
San Francisco.
In 1988, Texas Treasurer Ann Richards, delivering the
keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in
Atlanta, skewered presumed Republican nominee George
H.W. Bush as having been “born with a silver foot in his
mouth.”
In 2003, basketball star Kobe Bryant was charged with
sexually assaulting a 19-year-old woman at a Colorado spa;
Bryant denied the charge, saying he was guilty only of adul-
tery. The body of British scientist David Kelly, a weapons
expert at the center of a storm over British intelligence on
Iraq, was found a day after he’d committed suicide.
In 2008, one of the world’s largest mobile cranes
collapsed at a refinery in southeast Houston, killing four
people and injuring seven others. Two French humanitar-
ian aid workers were kidnapped in Afghanistan’s Day Kundi
province.
In 2012, rebels penetrated the heart of Syria’s power
elite, detonating a bomb inside a high-level crisis meeting in
Damascus that killed three leaders of the regime, including
President Bashar Assad’s brother-in-law and the defense
minister. A bus bombing at the Burgas airport in Bulgaria
killed five Israeli tourists, the bus driver and the alleged
perpetrator.
Today’s Birthdays: Former South African President
Nelson Mandela is 95. Former Sen. John Glenn, D-Ohio,
is 92. Skating champion and commentator Dick Button is
84. Actor James Brolin is 73. Baseball executive Joe Torre
is 73. Singer Ricky Skaggs is 59. Golfer Nick Faldo is 56.
Actress Elizabeth McGovern is 52. Actor Vin Diesel is 46.
Dance music singer-songwriter M.I.A. is 38. Actress Kristen
Bell is 33. Actor Chace Crawford is 28.
Today in History
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
EdwardJones

Jeff Overberg
Financial
Advisor
404 Hamilton Rd.
Wapakoneta, OH
419-738-9658
800-995-0247
1103 Gardenia Dr.
Suite 1
Wapakoneta, OH
419-738-4849
866-738-4849
Chad F. Metzger
Financial
Advisor
Has the crazy notion
that college saving
for a child should
be less complicated
than raising one.
It is strange to think your financial
advisor should actually simplify
the college-saving process?
Fortunately, our over 11,000
financial advisors are in
neighborhoods like yours, so
having a coversation about
planning for college is easy.
Because parenting is complicated
enough. Join the nearly 7 million
investors who know. Face time
and think time make sense.
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Saturday, July 20th
1:00-3:30 PM
(Rain date: Sunday, July 21st)
1202 Lincoln Highway
RICK’S MOTORS
passengers tried to over-
take the hijackers.
From that point, Son-
ny’s focuses changed back
to the military.
“He had his mind made
up,” his father said. “He
wanted to join the Ma-
rines.”
Another twist in Son-
ny’s life occurred soon
afer that. He planned on
signing up through the
delayed entry program
when he was 17, and soon
afer hiting that age, he
made plans with his father
to visit a Marine recruiter
in Lima.
However, afer arriving
at the recruiting of ce, the
Marine recruiter wasn’t
there. However, the Army
recruiter was, so Sonny
and his father decided to
check it out.
“We met with the
Army recruiter and I was
very impressed with him,”
Chris Zimmerman said. “I
told my son, if you come
out of this being half as
mature as that guy, you
would have done well.”
Sonny was a natural
born leader, and afer
eight years he worked
himself to the rank of staf
sergeant.
Tose leadership skills
began to show early in his
life, as refected by his for-
mer baseball coach, Tim
Pence, who is now princi-
pal at Waynesfeld-Gosh-
en Elementary School.
“He was a total team
player,” Pence said. “Vo-
cally, he was the leader of
the team. Te other kids
instantly looked to him to
lead the direction of the
team. He did his best. He
played real hard.”
His skills as a leader,
pitcher and catcher with
the baseball team trans-
lated well to the military,
and he quickly became a
leader respected by all.
Sonny had the same
afect while a member of
the football team.
“He always liked it,”
Chris Zimmerman said.
“He liked what he did. He
considered those under
him as ‘his men.’ To him,
they were the best.”
Sonny was living his
dream life on his terms,
defending his country.
He served two tours in
the war on terror, and
then married the love of
his life, Morgan, in Sep-
tember of last year, while
treating her 5-year-old
step-daughter, Riley, as if
she was his own.
Life would have one
more twist for him soon
afer.
During his third tour
of duty, Sonny was in-
jured in a June 3 atack,
along with 15 other peo-
ple. Ten school children
and two other G.I.s were
also killed in the atack.
Sonny sufered injuries to
his arm and back and had
shrapnel in his leg.
In that fnal twist in his
life, Sonny would return
to serve.
“He was the only one
of all of those injured that
returned,” his father said.
“He felt he had a job to do,
and he loved doing it.”
Te last of many unex-
pected turns took Sonny’s
life on Tuesday while do-
ing what he loved. Te
sting of the loss will un-
doubtedly be felt by his
wife, family, friends and
soldiers who looked for
him for leadership.
While such a loss is
hard to bear, Chris Zim-
merman said if he could
somehow get a message to
those he had lef behind,
he knows exactly what it
would be.
“He would tell every-
body it is OK,” his father
said. “Everything will be
alright. I got to do what
I wanted to do. I got to
be where I wanted to be.
Don’t worry about me.
Just remember the fun
things we did. Tat is what
he would say.”
Chris said that Sonny
never saw himself as a
hero, that he saw the other
soldiers he led as the true
heroes. Perhaps that is
one of the several traits
that made it obvious of
what he was. A true hero.
Sonny will be remem-
bered as an avid hockey
fan who had a love for the
Detroit Red Wings. His
favorite player, as his fa-
ther put it, “was anybody
who played on the Red
Wings.”
His love of hockey will
be one of the refections
they had of Sonny, go-
ing to participate in roller
hockey leagues in Lima
and Celina.
If it wasn’t game day,
he shared in the fun with
his sister, Baily, who is also
now in the military. Sonny
would have Baily dress in
complete gear and play
goalie, while he tried to
slide the ball passed her
for the score.
“If you looked at his
pictures, he was always
smiling,” Chris Zimmer-
man said. “He was elec-
tric. He walked into a
room as if he owned it. He
would simply ask every-
one to support his guys
over there, and to support
his family here.”
Auglaize County Fair
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2013
Food, Family and FUN!
Season Passes $
25.
00
7 day pass
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SAVE 45%
off of regular admission
Visit one of the following locations, stop at the
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Wagner's IGA
Western Ohio
True Value
St. Marys
Minster Bank
Pantry Pride
New Knoxville
First National Bank
Cridersville
Chase Bank
Waynesfield
Tussing Pizza
Wapakoneta
Minster Bank
Chase Bank
First National Bank
5/3 Bank
July 28-August 3rd
Royal From Page 1A
PAGEANT
6A
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
antries with the other 11 girls and
friends and family. “Some of these
girls I had never talked to before
because I am older and I never
really see some
of the younger
girls, but geting
to know them
was so much fun
and honestly if I
didn’t win any-
thing it would
not have mat-
tered because I
just love all of them and I wanted
the best for all of them.”
Five other girls walked away
with sashes or trophies during the
Miss Summer Moon scholarship
pageant Wednesday evening at
the Wapakoneta Performing Arts
Center.
Salon Gegel, 18, who also
graduated from Wapakoneta High
School in 2013, was named 1st
runner-up for the second consecu-
tive year. Fellow graduate Sidney
Nuss was named 2nd runner-up
and Wapakoneta High School se-
nior Karli Schneider was named
3rd runner-up.
Schneider, 17, also won Miss
Photogenic, while fellow senior
Haley Aldrich, 17, won Most Spir-
ited. Annie Henderson, 19, who
graduated in June, won Miss Con-
geniality.
Twelve girls competed for the
crown, but the end of the night be-
longed to Campbell.
She said when she heard her
name read as
the new queen
she was “just
shocked. I feel so
humble to win
such an award
and to know that
I am going to be
a role model for
litle girls, young
girls all over Wapak. I am just so
excited to start my reign and I just
can’t wait — excitement as well.”
For her, the other girls and the
friendships cultivated by the schol-
arship pageant, she said, helped
calm her nerves throughout the
night.
“I made a lot of new friends
through this, friends that I will
never forget,” the daughter of Tami
and Terry Campbell said.
Te contestants included
Chrystalina Collins, 17, a senior,
Sara Foor, 16, a junior, Sean Huels-
kamp, 15, a sophomore, Courtney
Fisher, 18, a 2013 graduate, Bay-
leigh Clark, 16, a junior, and Dusty
Hoelscher, 17, a senior, as well as
Aldrich, Schneider, Gegel, Hen-
derson and Campbell.
As queen, Campbell, who in-
tends to study nursing at the Uni-
versity of Toledo, earned a $1,000
scholarship from the Wapakoneta
Area Chamber of Commerce.
She said her favorite portions of
the contest were the interview and
the creative performance, while
the question at the end of the pag-
eant made her most nervous. Te
contest also consisted of a speech
and evening wear competition.
During the creative perfor-
mance, she danced barefoot in a
black outft to “Unchained Melo-
dy.” She started and ended by read-
ing a love leter.
For her speech, Campbell talked
about her volunteer work in Africa
and ended by quoting the late Neil
Armstrong, who was the focus of
the tribute during Wednesday’s
pageant, by saying, “Te single
observation I would ofer for your
consideration is that some things
are beyond your control. You can
lose your health to illness or acci-
dent. You can lose your wealth to
all manner of unpredictable sourc-
es. What are not easily stolen from
you without your cooperation are
your principles and your values.
Tey are your most important pos-
sessions and, if carefully selected
and nurtured, will well serve you
and your fellow man.”
Gegel said she was excited to
be 1st runner-up and having the
chance during the next year to fll
in for Campbell at events.
“I am very excited, the scholar-
ship money is great and it is a great
way to represent the community,”
the daughter of Tammy and Mike
Gegel said.
“I think one of my favorite
things about competing in the pag-
eant is seeing all
the young girls
in parades with
their litle plas-
tic tiaras and
they are patient-
ly waiting and
then when you
wave back they
start scream-
ing,” she said. “You know that litle
girl will remember you because I
remembered Miss Summer Moon
in the parade when I was 5-years-
old and now I get to be in the pa-
rade and do all those things.”
In her speech, Gegel talked
about the power of a smile and
how it “makes friends, builds hope
and can even save lives.” She dis-
cussed her promise to smile at ev-
eryone as she revealed if she had
smiled at everyone earlier in life
then maybe one boy would not
have commited suicide and how
her smile helped brighten the day
of another friend, who was having
a bad day.
For her creative performance,
Gegel danced to a self-choreo-
graphed traditional Indian dance
with her twin brother, Cedric, and
Liam Martell.
Nuss and Schneider, who were
competing in their frst queen
pageant, sang songs during their
creative performance. Nuss sang
“At Last” while
dressed in a full-
length charcoal-
colored dress
with sparkles,
while Schneider
sang “Have You
Ever” while play-
ing the piano in
a black blouse
and white-and-black full-length
skirt with a Peruvian design.
Te daughter of Dean Nuss ad-
dressed the issue of bullying and
how in a world full of hate that
bullying is aimed at damaging a
person’s self-esteem and self-con-
fdence and how bullies atacked
her about her appearance. She said
she “changed and learned to be
happy with the person I am” and
“being yourself is never a bad thing
because we all have gifs and short-
comings and if we stand up and
try again, with our hearts and our
minds then everything is possible.”
Nuss said her enjoyment was
competing and not necessarily
placing.
“It was a shocker to me because
it was a good competition with a
lot of great girls who had fabulous
talents,” Nuss said. “I was amazed
because anyone could have won.”
Te 18-year-old said she really
enjoyed how “close she got with all
the girls and you lean on everyone
like a family. When Jocelyn won, I
felt so much joy for her because we
had become so close.”
Te daughter of Gretchen and
Mark Schneider talked about frst
learning to ride a bicycle and the
lessons learned from falling, scrap-
ing a knee and geting back on the
bicycle until a person can travel at
higher speeds during her speech.
She quoted Albert Einstein who
said life is about balance and to
stay balanced a person must keep
moving, like a person on a bicycle.
From learning to ride, people later
in life learn to “keep their eyes for-
ward, despite their scraped knees,
to pick themselves back up of the
ground and take that one giant
leap” into the future.
Te 17-year-old said she could
not speak when her name was an-
nounced as 3rd runner-up.
“I was completely speechless
when I got 3rd runner-up, I had no
idea that I would place,” Schnei-
der said. “I thought it would be
awesome to just place and I never
knew it would be me.
“I think the pageant would be a
great experience for anyone,” she
said afer months of meetings, a
photo shoot, working at Relay for
Life and now the pageant. “It really
boosts your self-confdence and
it is a really great experience for
young teenagers.”
Campbell
Nuss
Gegel
Schneider
Bayleigh Clark, 16
Parents: Erryn Clark
Brenda and Jason Clark
Performance:
Rollerblading
Speech: Female equality
in sports
Chrystalina Collins, 17
Parents: John Collins
Performance: Hip hop to
two-step
Speech: The beauty
within really matters
Dusty Hoelscher, 17
Parents: Julie Hoelscher
and Kim and Dave
Hoelscher
Performance: Drums to
Tarzan song
Speech: Girl Scout
promise
Sara Foor, 16
Parents: Anita and Mike
Foor
Performance: Sang 100
ways to live a man
Speech: Importance of
role models
Haley Aldrich, 17
Parents: James and
Kimberly Aldrich
Performance: dance to
“We All Bleed Red”
Speech: Snapshot of life
is not the real person
Annie Henderson, 19
Parents: Tonya and
Steve Henderson
Performance: Basketball
performance and tap
Speech: Rules in life,
never give up
Sean Huelskamp, 15
Parents: Marie and Scott
Huelskamp
Performance: Magic act
while singing “Magic”
Speech: Nurturing of
parents more important
Courtney Fisher, 18
Parents: Cheri and Scott
Wieging, Melissa and
Glenn Fisher
Performance: Sewing
Speech: It is OK to be
who you are
By RALPH D. RUSSO
AP College Football Writer
NEW YORK (AP) —
Hang on to NCAA Foot-
ball 2014, all you video
game fans. It will be a col-
lector’s edition.
T h e
NCAA said
Wednesday it
will no longer
allow Elec-
tronic Arts
Inc. to use
its logo start-
ing next year.
Te move ends a lucra-
tive business deal with
the gaming industry giant
and comes as the NCAA
fghts a high-profle law-
suit that says the govern-
ing body owes billions of
dollars to former players
for allowing their like-
nesses to be used for free.
Te NCAA said it
won’t seek a new contract
with EA Sports, which
manufactures the popular
game, beyond the current
one that expires in June
2014. However, that won’t
stop EA Sports from pro-
ducing a college football
video game depicting
powerhouse schools like
Alabama, Ohio State and
Oregon, and the Red-
wood City, Calif.-based
company made that clear.
“EA Sports will contin-
ue to develop and publish
college football games,
but we will no longer in-
clude the NCAA names
and marks,” said Andrew
Wilson, executive vice
president. “Our relation-
ship with the Collegiate
Licensing Co. is strong
and we are already work-
ing on a new game for
next generation consoles
which will launch next
year and feature the col-
lege teams, conferences
and all the innovation fans
expect from EA Sports.”
Te company reported
$3.8 billion in net revenue
during its last fscal year
and, aside from its NCAA
Football franchise, is well
known for Madden NFL,
FIFA Soccer and other
games.
EA Sports frst began
making an NCAA foot-
ball game in 1998.
Todd Mitchell, senior
analyst with New York-
based Brean Capital, LLC,
said losing the NCAA
brand isn’t likely to hurt
EA Sports. He estimated
NCAA Football accounts
for only about 5 percent
of EA Sports’ revenue, or
about $125 million.
“It’s nice to have the
brand, but it’s more about
the characters,” he said.
It could not immedi-
ately be determined ex-
actly how much of what
EA makes from NCAA
football goes back to the
NCAA and its members
in licensing deals.
Analyst Colin Sebas-
tian of R.W. Baird said EA
Sports likely expected to
lose its partnership with
the NCAA.
“I’m sure they have
thought about this be-
cause of this pending liti-
gation and the worst case
scenarios,” Sebastian said
by telephone from San
Francisco. “I don’t expect
it to have a signifcant im-
pact on their business.”
See GAME, Page 3B
Page 2B:
Photo gallery of
Wapakoneta Waves at
WOAL Championships
Section
B
Thursday, July 18, 2013 SPORTS
Sports Editor
BRAD FRANK
sports@wapakwdn.com
419-739-3508

QUOTE
of the day
“EA Sports will continue to
develop and publish college
football games, but we
will no longer include the
NCAA names and marks.”
Andrew Lewis
EA Sports Exec. VP
Michigan signs Beilein through 2018-19
By LARRY LAGE
AP Sports Writer
Michigan men’s basketball coach John Beilein has signed a new deal
that keeps him with the Wolverines through the 2018-19 season.
Athletic director Dave Brandon told The Associated Press on Wednesday
that Beilein signed a three-year extension that replaces his previous contract.
The 60-year-old Beilein will make $2.45 million a year in total compensa-
tion.
Michigan hired Beilein in March 2007, a week after he led West Virginia
to the NIT championship. Last year, the Wolverines tied a school record with
31 wins and lost in the NCAA championship game to Louisville.
SCHEDULE QUICK LOOK
Friday
MLB
Pirates at Reds, 7:10 p.m.
Indians at Twins, 8:10 p.m.
Saturday
MLB
Pirates at Reds, 4:05 p.m.
Indians at Twins, 7:10 p.m.
Sunday
MLB
Pirates at Reds, 4:05 p.m.
Indians at Twins, 7:10 p.m.
NCAA to stop
putting name, logo
on EA video game
CBJ’s Horton
undergoes surgery
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Columbus  Blue  Jackets
forward Nathan Horton
has undergone surgery
to repair a
shoulder in-
jury sufered
during the
Stanley Cup
fnals, general manager
Jarmo Kekalainen an-
nounced on Wednesday.
Te surgery was per-
formed by Dr. Jon Warner
at the Boston Shoulder
Institute at Massachusets
General Hospital.
Horton signed a seven-
year, $37.1-million con-
tract with the Blue  Jack-
ets on July 5. He has 198
goals and 204 assists for
402 points with 543 pen-
alty minutes in 591 ca-
reer NHL games with the
Florida Panthers and Bos-
ton Bruins. Tis past sea-
son, he had 13 goals and
nine assists in 43 games
with the Bruins before
picking up seven goals
and 12 assists in 22 Stan-
ley Cup Playof games.
Horton is expected to
miss the start of the sea-
son during rehab.
Garman
headed to
Arizona to
rehab injury
By BRAD FRANK
Sports Editor
PHOENIX — Brian
Garman arrived Wednes-
day in Arizona to begin
rehab at the
Mi l waukee
B r e w e r s ’
spring train-
ing facility in
Phoenix, as
the Wapakoneta native
continues to be on the
shelf with an injury.
Garman, a pitcher for
the Huntsville Stars, a
Double-A minor league
baseball team of the
Southern League based
in Huntsville, Ala., is at-
tempting to nurse himself
back to health afer sufer-
ing a torn labrum earlier
this summer. He has been
on the disabled list since
June 24.
Upon arriving in Phoe-
nix, Garman was re-eval-
uated by on-site trainers
and therapists, who con-
frmed the labrum tear. All
medical evaluations, how-
ever, have indicated the
labrum tear is not caus-
ing the symptoms keep-
ing Garman from playing.
Rather, Garman said he
has been told his injury is
an impingement or tendi-
nitis.
“I’ll start playing catch
based on how I feel,” Gar-
man said late Wednesday
in Arizona. “It’s going to
be a day-to-day thing.”
Garman said he has not
been given a timeline as
far as his return to action.
“I have no idea how
many days I’ll be in
Arizona. Hopefully, it
doesn’t take too long to
get back to normal,” Gar-
man said. “It could be a
mater of
days, it
could be
a mater
of weeks,
b u t
h o p e -
fully not
months.”
A n
MRI conducted July 2 on
Garman revealed the la-
brum tear. Te MRI was
ordered afer a throwing
session was halted July 1
when Garman did not re-
cover from an original in-
jury to the shoulder, forc-
ing his DL stint.
At the time he was
placed on the DL, this
season Garman had 1-0
record, a 4.25 ER and 22
strikeouts.
Garman said he found
out Tuesday that indeed
he would be headed to
Arizona, knowing it was
a possibility as much as a
week ago.
Te Stars resume
games today afer being
of Monday due to the
Southern League’s All-
Star break.
Garman, who will turn
25 years old Friday, said
Tursday he was planning
a visit to Wapakoneta dur-
ing the break but the trip
to Phoenix disrupted that
plan.
Garman atended the
University of Cincin-
nati for baseball and was
drafed in the 17th round
of the 2010 MLB draf by
the Brewers. He is a 2006
Wapakoneta High School
graduate.
Te Brewers are Hunts-
ville’s MLB parent club.
Garman has spent
parts of two seasons with
Huntsville.
Working in the water
Staff photo/John Zwez
Lily Lynch, 9, of the Wapakoneta Waves swim team, competed in the 200-meter
freestyle relay, was 56th (1:09.36) in the 50-meter freestyle and 56th (1:29.64) in
the 50 backstroke in the Western Ohio Aquatic League Championships this past
weekend at Bluffton Community Pool.
LAHAINA, Hawaii
(AP) — Dayton will face
Gonzaga, the No. 1 team
in last season’s fnal AP
college basketball poll,
in the open-
ing round
of the EA
Sports Maui
Invitational,
while Final Four partici-
pant Syracuse will meet
Minnesota and frst-year
coach Richard Pitino.
Te other frst-round
games on Nov. 25 at the
Lahaina Civic Center will
have California against
Arkansas and Baylor
facing Division II host
Chaminade, it was an-
nounced Wednesday.
Te Gonzaga-Dayton
and Chaminade-Baylor
winners will meet in one
semifnal with the Syra-
cuse-Minnesota and Ar-
kansas-California winners
in the other. Te champi-
onship game is Nov. 27.
Dayton
to face
Gonzaga
in Maui
By RALPH D. RUSSO
AP College Football Writer
Te Big Ten and the
Detroit Lions have an-
nounced a six-year agree-
ment to play a bowl game
at Ford Field,
and a person
familiar with
the situation
says the Atlantic Coast
Conference will provide
the opponent.
Te new bowl will start
in the 2014 season and it
has not been named or
sponsored.
Te person familiar
with the situation tells
Te Associated Press the
game will be a matchup of
Big Ten and ACC teams.
Te person spoke on con-
dition of anonymity be-
cause a formal announce-
ment was to come later.
ESPN.com frst reported
the ACC would be part of
the new Detroit Bowl.
Te conferences will
select the teams to play in
the new game.
“We are thrilled to be
hosting a new bowl game
See BOWL, Page 3B
Big Ten,
Lions
team up
for new
bowl
game
Garman
EA Sports photo
This image depicts the popular EA Sports video game
series ‘NCAA Football.’ The NCAA announced Wednes-
day it would not renew its contract with EA Sports
when it expires in June 2014. EA Sports said it will con-
tinue to publish a college football video game.
SUMMER SWIM
2B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
Wapak Waves 11-12s at WOAL
Staff photo/John Zwez
Danielle Slechter finished third (1:13.83) in the 100-meter
freestyle, fifth (1:27.39) in the 100 individual medley, fifth
(39.0) in the 50-meter backstroke, seventh (39.0) in the
50 butterfly and eighth (34.49) in the 50 freestyle.
Staff photo/John Zwez
Emma Davis was eighth on a 200-meter freestyle relay team, 19th (47.64) in the
50-meter backstroke, 19th (1:47.10) in the 100-meter individual medley, 20th (55.27) in
the 50 breaststroke and 40th (42.54) in the 50 freestyle.
Staff photo/John Zwez
Hannah Ott was eighth on a 200-meter freestyle relay team and on a 200 medley team,
31st (50.73) in the 50-meter backstroke and 35th (41.56) in the 50 freestyle.
Staff photo/John Zwez
Nathaniel Miller took third on a 200-meter meter medley relay team, third (1:18.16) in
the 100-meter freestyle, fourth on a 200 freestyle relay team, seventh (43.64) in the
50-meter butterfly and seventh (1:38.32) in the 100 individual medley.
Staff photo/John Zwez
Danielle Slechter appears on the awards podium with
a medal after her third-place finish in the 100-meter
freestyle Saturday.
Staff photo/John Zwez
Nathaniel Miller appears on the awards podium with
his medal after taking third in the 100-meter freestyle
Saturday.
Staff photo/John Zwez
Members of the Wapakoneta Waves swim team participate in the 80’s-themed
swimmers parade Friday morning prior to the start of competition.
Staff photos/John Zwez
LEFT: Wapakoneta Waves coach Mark Law looks on
during the meet. RIGHT: Members of the Wapakoneta
Waves participate in the 80’s-themed swimmers parade
Friday morning prior to the start of competition.
Girls tie for 5th;
boys finish 5th
BLUFFTON — Both the boys and girls for the
Wapakoneta Waves ages 11-12 groups took ffh place
at the Western Ohio Aquatic League Championships at
Bluf on Community Pool.
Te girls team tied with the Bluf on Sardines, each
totaling 146 points.
Te Shawnee CC Tide was the girls 11-12 champion.
For the boys, Wapakoneta scored 121 points.
Te Westside Waves tallied 411 points to win the
boys 11-12 crown.
SPORTS
3B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
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LeBron James
wins 3 trophies
at ESPY Awards
By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer
LOS ANGELES (AP)
— LeBron James padded
his trophy collection, re-
ceiving three at the ESPY
Awards, including male
athlete of the year for
helping the Miami Heat
win a second straight
NBA championship.
James also won in the
championship perfor-
mance and NBA player
categories, completing a
sweep of the three awards
he won last year. He
shared in the best team
award Wednesday night.
James beat out Miguel
Cabrera of the Detroit Ti-
gers, Minnesota Vikings
running back Adrian
Peterson and Olympic
swimmer Michael Phelps
for male athlete honors.
Serena Williams won
two awards, including
female athlete of the
year. She defeated a pair
of Olympians, gymnast
Gabby Douglas and
swimmer Missy Franklin,
and former Baylor basket-
ball star Britney Griner.
Williams didn’t atend be-
cause she’s playing a tour-
nament in Sweden.
Peterson and Phelps
also won two awards each.
Jon Hamm, the star of
AMC’s “Mad Men,” host-
ed the 21st annual show
from the Nokia Teatre.
Quarterback Johnny
Manziel of Texas A&M
won male college athlete
honors afer fying in ear-
lier from Hoover, Ala.,
where he atended SEC
media day. Griner, who
now plays for the WNBA’s
Phoenix Mercury, won fe-
male college athlete.
Peterson won trophies
for NFL player and best
comeback, while Cabrera
won as best MLB player.
Williams won female
tennis player, giving her
eight career ESPYs.
Phelps also claimed
best male Olympian, while
teenage swimming sensa-
tion Missy Franklin won
best female Olympian.
San Francisco 49ers
quarterback Colin Kae-
pernick won as break-
through athlete. Rick Piti-
no won as coach-manager
for guiding the Louisville
Cardinals to a national
basketball championship.
Te best game was
Game 6 of the NBA fnals
between the Heat and
San Antonio Spurs.
Te award for best up-
set went to Florida Gulf
Coast’s men’s basketball
team, a No. 15 seed that
upset No. 2 seed George-
town in the NCAA tour-
nament.
Te best moment
award singled out 7-year-
old Jack Hofman’s 69-
yard touchdown run at
Nebraska’s spring game in
April, which was replayed
on national TV and
viewed more than 2 mil-
lion times on YouTube.
Te boy from Atkinson,
Neb., has brain cancer.
Sidney Crosby won
NHL player, while Ti-
erry Henry of the New
York Red Bulls won MLS
player.
South Carolina foot-
ball player Jadeveon
Clowney won best play
for his hit on Michigan’s
Vincent Smith in which
he knocked the runner on
his back with a helmet-
toppling smack, then
reached out with one
hand to snare the ball.
Te Arthur Ashe Cour-
age award went to “Good
Morning America” co-
anchor Robin Roberts,
who underwent a bone
marrow transplant last fall
to treat a life-threatening
blood and bone marrow
disease. She was of work
for fve months before
returning to her TV job.
James presented Roberts
with the award, and frst
lady Michelle Obama sa-
luted her via video.
Te Jimmy V Award for
Perseverance was given to
father-and-son duo Dick
and Rick Hoyt by actor-
director Ben Af eck. Te
younger Hoyt was born
with cerebral palsy and is
unable to use his hands
and legs. His 73-year-old
father Dick pushes him
in a custom-made run-
ning chair, and together
they have participated in
more than 1,000 endur-
ance events, including 31
Boston Marathons.
Te winners in most
categories were deter-
mined by fan voting.
Bowl From Page 1B
Hanging out by the pool
Provided photo
Pictured, from left, are Ryan Richardson, Ross Honigford, Ian Steinbrunner and Dillon Kaeck, who all
competed together in the boys 8-and-under 100-meter freestyle relay Saturday at the Western Ohio Aquatic
League Championships, finishing with a time of 1 minute, 48.78 seconds. The boys were mistakenly
identified in a photo on Page 1B in the Tuesday, July 16 edition of the Wapakoneta Daily News.
in Detroit that will be
anchored by an annual
commitment from the
Big Ten,” Lions president
Tom Lewand said. “In ad-
dition to showcasing our
city and its rich football
tradition, this game will
be an opportunity for
fans to enjoy a postseason
matchup featuring one of
college football’s best con-
ferences.”
Te new game could
spell the end for the Lit-
tle Caesars Pizza Bowl,
which has been played in
Detroit and tried to match
the Big Ten and Mid-
American Conference.
Te Big Ten ofen would
not have enough bowl eli-
gible teams to send one to
the Litle Caesars Bowl.
Ken Hofman, the ex-
ecutive director of the Lit-
tle Caesars Bowl, did not
return a message seeking
comment.
Te Litle Caesars Bowl
has been held at Ford
Field since 2002. Te
game was originally called
the Motor City Bowl and
held at the Silverdome.
MAC Commissioner
Jon Steinbrecher said the
announcement of the
new Detroit bowl was
not a surprise, and his
league still looks forward
to holding its champion-
ship game in Detroit. Te
2014 season marks the
beginning of the new col-
lege football playof, leav-
ing the rest of the bowl
scene uncertain as far as
which conferences will
play where.
“We’re all kind of in the
process of re-jiggering,”
Steinbrecher said.
Last season, Northern
Illinois became the frst
MAC team to reach the
Bowl Championship Se-
ries, playing in the Orange
Bowl. Tat’s an honor the
league can try to build on.
“Every year is a new
year,” Steinbrecher said.
“You’ve got to go out and
do it again.”
WDN Sports on
Twitter: @WDN_Sports
Game From Page 1B
NCAA Football al-
lows participants to play
as any major college foot-
ball team, though unlike
in its professional sports
games, the names of
players are not used. Te
similarities between the
avatars in the game and
actual college athletes are
at the root of a legal fght
that could alter the way
the NCAA does business
in the future.
Te NCAA is in the
midst of a long court
batle that started with
a lawsuit fled by former
UCLA basketball star Ed
O’Bannon afer he was
shown a video game with
an avatar playing for the
Bruins that played a lot
like him.
Te anti-trust law-
suit also names EA and
the Collegiate Licensing
Company that handles
trademark licensing for
dozens of schools, the
NCAA and various con-
ferences. Te suit has
expanded to include sev-
eral former athletes who
claim the NCAA and EA
Sports used their names
and likenesses without
compensation and de-
mand the NCAA fnd a
way to give players a cut
of the billions of dollars
earned from live broad-
casts, memorabilia sales
and video games.
“We are confdent in
our legal position regard-
ing the use of our trade-
marks in video games,”
the NCAA said. “But
given the current busi-
ness climate and costs of
litigation, we determined
participating in this game
is not in the best interests
of the NCAA.
“Te NCAA has never
licensed the use of cur-
rent student-athlete
names, images or like-
nesses to EA. Te NCAA
has no involvement in
licenses between EA and
former student-athletes,”
it said in a statement.
Still, the NCAA said
its members can seek ar-
rangements with video
game manufacturers if
they wish.
“Member colleges and
universities license their
own trademarks and oth-
er intellectual property
for the video game,” the
NCAA said. “Tey will
have to independently
decide whether to con-
tinue those business ar-
rangements in the future.”
Michael Hausfeld,
the lead atorney on the
O’Bannon case, said the
NCAA cuting ties with
EA could provide greater
freedom for EA to make
deals with conferences,
schools and even players.
“No longer would EA
have to pretend the ava-
tars are not the likenesses
of the real players,” he
said.
Keith Olbermann
rejoining ESPN
BRISTOL, Conn.
(AP) — Keith Olber-
mann is rejoining ESPN
to host a late-night show.
Olbermann rose
to prominence as a
“SportsCenter” anchor
from 1992-97 before one
of several contentious de-
partures that have marked
his career.
Te network said
Wednesday that “Olber-
mann” will premiere Aug.
26. It will generally air at
11 p.m. ET Monday-Fri-
day on ESPN2, depend-
ing on live event coverage
on the channel. Te show
will include commentary,
interviews, panel discus-
sions and highlights.
His last two politi-
cally oriented jobs end-
ed poorly. Olbermann
quit abruptly in January
2011 afer eight years as
a prime-time host at MS-
NBC, and his later tenure
at Current TV lasted a
year before he was taken
of the air and responded
with a lawsuit, setled out
of court.
Lions release
RB Jahvid Best
ALLEN PARK, Mich.
(AP) — Te Detroit Lions
have released running back
Jahvid Best, a frst-round
draf pick from 2010 who
hasn’t played since Octo-
ber 2011 because of con-
cussion problems.
General manager Mar-
tin Mayhew calls Best
as fne a person and pro-
fessional as he has ever
worked with. Best says Li-
ons fans and the people of
Detroit will always hold a
special place in his heart.
Best accounted for
1,000-plus yards and six
touchdowns as a rookie,
but he was limited to six
games during the 2011
season afer what he said
was the third concussion
of his football career.
Detroit signed Reggie
Bush in the ofseason to
help boost its inconsis-
tent running game.
Ohio crop growers
will have the opportu-
nity to view firsthand a
new method of injecting
poultry litter during Ohio
State University’s 2013
Manure Science Review
Aug. 6.
The new subsurfer in-
jector allows growers to
reap the extensive ben-
efits of this type of ma-
nure while promoting
water quality by lessening
the potential for agricul-
tural runoff. It’s use will
be demonstrated at the
Review, an educational
program for farmers, live-
stock managers, certified
crop advisers, profession-
al engineers and others.
The Review features
speakers from industry,
livestock groups, con-
servation agencies, and
Ohio State’s College of
Food, Agricultural, and
Environmental Sciences,
including Ohio State Uni-
versity Extension and the
Ohio Agricultural Re-
search and Development
Center, which are the
college’s outreach and re-
search arms, respectively.
The subsurfer allows
crop growers to benefit
from the use of poultry
litter, which is high in ni-
trogen, phosphorus and
potassium and has been
shown to increase yields
without increasing the
potential for negative en-
vironmental impact, said
Amanda Douridas, an
OSU Extension agricul-
ture and natural resources
educator.
“The machine creates
eight rows of trenches
that are two inches wide,
three feet deep and about
12 inches apart, using ro-
tating augers to deposit
the litter below the sur-
face and covering the
trenches,” she said. “The
augers help break up large
chunks of litter into a fine
material that is better de-
posited into the soil.
“The method improves
water quality because it
results in less phospho-
rus in groundwater and
also lessens the amount
of nitrogen that is released
into the air.Until now,
solid manures could only
be surface applied, with
or without tillage, which
increases runoff risks.”
Created by scientists
with the U.S. Department
of Agricul-
ture’s Ag-
ricultural
Research
S e r v i c e ,
the sub-
s u r f e r
has been
found to
lower nu-
trient runoff and ammo-
nia emissions by some 90
percent while increasing
forage yields, the agency
said in published reports.
It has also been found to
lower phosphorus runoff
and ammonia loss and in-
crease corn yields, accord-
ing to USDA.
Still in the prototype
phase, the machine is
used in pastures and no-
till fields. It can also use
composted cattle manure,
according to USDA.
“To be able to demon-
strate it in Ohio so area
growers can see it and
learn more about it is very
exciting,” Douridas said.
“Poultry litter is very pop-
ular with crop producers
who don’t have livestock
because it’s easy to trans-
port and has very high nu-
trient content.”
Manure Science Re-
view runs from 8:30 a.m.
to 3 p.m. at the Hord
Livestock farm south
of Bucyrus. The near-
est street address is 1961
State Route 294, Marion.
The site is about a quar-
ter mile west of the street
address on the north side
of the road and will be
marked with signs.
The subsurfer demon-
stration is 1 to 3 p.m. dur-
ing the Review, Douridas
said.
Registration, which
includes a continental
breakfast and lunch, is
$30 per person by July 29
and $35 per person after
July 29.
To register, partici-
pants should send name,
affiliation, address, e-mail
address, telephone num-
ber and payment (with
checks made payable
to OARDC/OSU) to
Mary Wicks, OARDC/
OSU, 1680 Madison Ave.,
Wooster, 44691.
For more information,
contact Wicks at 330-
202-3533 or wicks.14@
osu.edu.
An agenda and registra-
tion form may be down-
loaded at http://go.osu.
edu/MSR2013 (pdf ).
Participants will be
eligible for the following
credits: 5.0 Ohio Depart-
ment of Agriculture Cer-
tified Livestock Manager
continuing education
hours, 3.0 Certified Crop
Adviser (CCA) Nutri-
ent Management con-
tinuing education units,
2.5 CCA Soil and Water
Management continu-
ing education units and
2.0 Professional Engineer
continuing professional
development hours.
The Review is spon-
sored by Ohio State, the
Ohio Livestock Coalition,
Ag Credit, and the Ohio
Soybean Council. Col-
laborators include Hord
Livestock, the Ohio De-
partment of Agriculture,
the Ohio Department of
Natural Resources Divi-
sion of Soil and Water
Resources, Ohio’s soil
and water conservation
districts, and the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture’s
Natural Resources Con-
servation Service.
John Smith is an agricul-
tural agent with the Aug-
laize County Ohio State
University Extension Office.
AGRICULTURE
4B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
Monday-Thursday 9:00-5:30
Friday 9-8
Saturday 9-5
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Agriculture Calendar
Aug. 12: The Auglaize County Agricultural Society (fair
board) is scheduled to meet at 8 p.m. at the Auglaize
County Junior Fair Building.
Aug. 14: The Auglaize Soil and Water Conservation
District Board of Supervisors is scheduled to meet at 8
a.m. at the office on Industrial Drive.
Aug. 14: The Auglaize Farm Service Agency board is
scheduled to meet at 8:30 a.m. at the county office on
Industrial Drive.
Grain Quotations
These are the prices provided by Advanced Agri-Solutions.
All prices are per bushel and are subject to change.
Wapakoneta
Crop 6/13 6/20 6/27 7/11 7/18
Wheat
July 13 6.62 6.77 6.50 6.49 6.37
Aug/Sep 13 6.60 6.74 6.50 6.49 6.37
July 14 6.62 6.99 6.80 6.67 6.52
Corn
July 13 6.63
FH Aug 13 6.59 6.19 6.38
Oct/Nov 13 5.11 5.32 5.12 4.96 4.72
Dec 13 5.18 5.37 5.17 5.04 4.79
Jan. 14 5.23 5.42 5.22 5.09 4.84
Mar 14 5.28 5.47 5.27 5.14 4.89
Beans
July 13 15.96
FH Aug 13 15.86
Oct/Nov 13 12.68 12.57 12.38 12.52 12.43
OSU demonstrates new injector
John
Smith
OEFFA continues tour series
Te Ohio Ecological
Farm & Food Association
(OEFFA) will continue
its 2013 farm tour series
in Licking County with
a tour of Northridge Or-
ganic Farm at 1 p.m. July
21.
Te farm is located at,
4211 Van Fossen Road in
Johnstown.
Mike and Laura Laugh-
lin have owned and oper-
ated Northridge Organic
Farm for 19 years and
have been certifed organ-
ic producers for 24 years.
Tey raise a variety
of seasonal produce for
sale at farmers’ markets,
restaurants, and retailers,
and are known through-
out central Ohio for their
delicious and colorful
heirloom tomatoes. Tey
have recently partnered
with Joseph Swain of
Swainway Urban Farm
in Columbus to transi-
tion the farm to the next
generation. Although the
Laughlins want to retire
to spend more time with
their family, “I really have
this strong feeling that
we owe something to our
customers,” Mike told Ed-
ible Columbus.
“Not only at the farm
market, but with the chefs
and owners we worked
with for years.”
Collaborating with Jo-
seph will allow the Laugh-
lins to provide continued
service to their custom-
ers, keep their farm in
production, and help an
already successful begin-
ning farmer expand.
Join the Laughlins on
this tour to learn how
they are working to meet
the growing demand for
healthy, locally grown
foods, while embracing
change and tomorrow’s
challenges.
For more information
about Northridge Or-
ganic Farm, call 740-967-
4462, email northridgeor-
ganicfarm@hotmail.com,
or visit their Facebook
page.
Tis tour is free and
open to the public. No
registration is necessary.
Given all the recent
rains, conditions at
Northridge are expected
to be wet. Please plan to
wear boots and other-
wise dress accordingly
for muddy conditions. To
reduce the stress on their
felds from parking, we
encourage guests to car-
pool if possible.
If you’re planning to
atend a summer farm
tour, we need volunteers
to take pictures. OEFFA
will use farm tour pic-
tures on the website and
in publications. High
resolution photos are
preferred. Photographers
will be given photo cred-
it. Send your farm tour
photos by email to Lau-
ren Ketcham at lauren@
oefa.org or mail on CD
to OEFFA, c/o Lauren
Ketcham, 41 Croswell
Road, Columbus, 43214.
Photo submitted
Mike and Laura Laughlin have owned and operated
Northridge Organic Farm for 19 years and have been
certified organic producers for 24 years.
Bureau to offer
intactive experience
COLUMBUS —
Family fun and a con-
nection to rural Ohio are
just two of the many rea-
sons for visitors to stop
by the Land and Living
exhibit at the Ohio State
Fair July 24 through
Aug. 4.
Presented by the
Ohio Farm Bureau Fed-
eration (OFBF), an ex-
hibit will demonstrate
agriculture’s link to ev-
eryday life.
Visitors to the exhibit,
located in the Nation-
wide Donahey Ag &
Hort Building, can par-
ticipate in a variety of
activities such as taking
a ride in a virtual com-
bine harvester simulator,
watching chicks and tur-
keys hatch and driving
remote control tractors
through a farm seting.
Children can ride a ped-
al tractor through the
OFBF country cruise
while adults can take a
stroll to learn about Ohio
crops, animals and other
important areas of Ohio
agriculture. Families also
can capture their fair ex-
perience with a souvenir
picture, compliments of
the Farm Bureau.
Te land and living
display will showcase
many new exhibits in-
cluding the country
connection stage wit-
demonstrations such
as winemaking basics,
sheep shearing, agri-
science experiments
and animals from the
Columbus Zoo. July 26
and 27, Gus Smithhisler
will carve a giant squash
weighing more than 600
pounds, and the joint
House and Senate Agri-
culture Commitee hear-
ing will be featured July
29.
Also joining the land
and living lineup is Seed
Survivor, presented by
Agrium. Tis highly in-
teractive exhibit will tca-
ture 20 multimedia and
virtual reality games, a
sunfower seed planting
station, a watershed cen-
ter and more. Tis ex-
hibit for youths demon-
strates that plants need
water, light, healthy soil,
and nutrients to survive,
as well as showing the
importance of agricul-
ture.
“Te Land and liv-
ing exhibit defnitely
has something for ev-
eryone in the family,”
said Ohio Farm Bureau
lead intern Kelly Fager.
‘’Te building is full of
activities that will leave
visitors with a beter
understanding of Ohio
agriculture.”
DENNIS THE MENACE
ZITS
SNUFFY SMITH
HI AND LOIS
FUNKY WINKERBEAN
CRANKSHAFT
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
BABY BLUES
Annie’s Mailbox
Bridge
Crossword Puzzle
LOCKHORNS
Horoscope
You are not helping anyone by adding stress
For Friday, July 19, 2013
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You feel generous to others today and will help
those who are less fortunate if you can. If dis-
cussing how to share something, don’t give
away the farm.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Relations with others are serious but consider-
ate today. People are supportive, but in practi-
cal ways. Nothing is frivolous.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
You might be able to visualize a better way to
do your job. You want to accomplish some-
thing today, and you want to do it fairly and
right.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Discussions about the care and education of
children might come up today. Discussion
with a romantic partner also will focus on
future possibilities.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
You want what’s best for your family today,
especially in a practical way. You’re looking for
ways to solidify your home base.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Discussions with others will be serious but
reasonable today. Both parties will be inclined
to see each other’s point of view, which is a
good head start.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
You might want to spend money on something
luxurious today, but you won’t. Part of you
does not want to be frivolous. This sensible
part wants you to spend money on practical
expenditures.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You feel a need to have a deeper understand-
ing of who you are today. This is why you
might be attracted to studies that promote this
-- meditation, metaphysics, yoga or spiritual-
ism.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Feelings of selfless generosity will make you
put the needs of others before your own today.
You won’t be denying yourself; it’s what you
want to do.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Someone older, or perhaps a teacher figure,
will inspire you to be the best you can be
today. This person might suggest that you lend
your efforts to a charitable group or a cause
that works for the benefit of others.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Someone in a position of authority might
inspire you today. You might see that power
and authority are useful if they are used in the
right way.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Any kind of teaching, religious meeting or
philosophical gathering will appeal to you
today, because you want to understand more
about what makes you tick. You also want to
learn more.
YOU BORN TODAY You have a natural grace
and style, which can be elegant. This can be
evident both verbally and physically. You have
high standards for yourself, which is why you
are sometimes self-critical (and also some-
times critical of others). Personally, you have
heroes that you admire. This year a major
change could take place, perhaps as signifi-
cant as something that occurred around 2004-
05.
Birthdate of: Benedict Cumberbatch, actor;
Edgar Degas, artist; Vikki Carr, singer/humani-
tarian.
(c) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
DEAR ANNIE: My
daughter, “Elizabeth,” is a pro-
fessional who is married to an
older man. I’ll call him “Jacob.”
They have two children.
Elizabeth recently was diag-
nosed with ovarian cancer and
is going through intense che-
motherapy. Early in her treat-
ment, Jacob used to help a lot
around the house with laundry
and meals, and took good care
of the kids. But she is halfway
through her treatments, and
although Jacob still looks after
Elizabeth and the children, he
expects her to do a lot more
around the house. Of course,
as soon as Elizabeth feels a lit-
tle strong, she goes beyond her
capacity and does too much.
This aggravates me. Eliza-
beth never demands that Jacob
help more. I had an argument
with him over it. On the day of
one of her treatments, I
reminded him to be home in
time to pick up the oldest child
from school. He replied, “I will
see when I will be finished at
my mother’s.” I told him that
on the day of the chemo, he
cannot leave his wife alone
with two children, supper and
homework time. It is very tir-
ing for her. He said he does not
need to be reminded. Then we
got into an argument, and he
said we do not love him, we
only do things for our daugh-
ter, and we are lucky he does
not close the door in our faces.
Annie, I worry about Eliza-
beth’s strength. We help as
much as we can by cooking
some meals, picking up the
oldest from school, helping
him with homework and tak-
ing the youngest so Elizabeth
can rest. But Jacob allows her
to do the laundry, cooking and
shopping while he cuts the
bushes, cleans the gutters and
prays (he is very religious).
She is not going to get well if
she is exhausted.
My sweet daughter always
takes her husband’s side, and
my husband tells me to look
after my own health, because I
had a mild heart attack a few
months ago. How do we han-
dle this? -- DISTRAUGHT
MOTHER
DEAR DISTRAUGHT:
We know you want Jacob to
take over all of these chores,
and we agree that he should do
more on the days when Eliza-
beth has her chemo. But try to
be more compassionate. Jacob
is going through a difficult
period, too, and also needs a
break.
Please do what you can for
your daughter’s family. It is a
great help when you can cook a
meal or take the kids. If you
can afford to hire someone to
assist on the days when Eliza-
beth has a chemo treatment,
that would be an amazing gift.
Otherwise, please back off a
bit. You are not helping your-
self or your daughter by getting
into fights with her husband
and adding stress to her life.
DEAR ANNIE: “Iowa”
wrote to say that her mother
suggested she put down her
13-year-old cat because he has
diabetes. She was upset that
Mom was so negative. But
Mom may be wiser than you
think.
I cared for my 18-year-old
diabetic cat, who needed insu-
lin shots daily. While the shots
are easy to administer, the
main problem is having to
schedule your entire life
around those injections. If
“Iowa” is still in school, has a
boyfriend and perhaps a part-
time job and a busy social cal-
endar, she might discover the
responsibility of daily shots at
regular times is a lot to incor-
porate. I was unable to accept a
job that required irregular
shifts and had to forgo summer
vacations that involved being
out of town unless I could take
my cat with me.
Because I made significant
sacrifices for my cat, she
enjoyed a good quality of life
for five years. But the commit-
ment is far more than just pok-
ing the cat with a needle. It is a
major responsibility she can-
not shirk when something
more interesting comes up. --
LIFETIME CAT LOVER
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to annies-
mailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254.
COMICS
5B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
CLASSIFIEDS
6B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
UPS
SERVICE
520 Industrial Dr., Wapakoneta, OH
419-738-2128
Available at...
DAILY NEWS
W A P A K O N E T A
sory or leadership
experience.
REFRI GERATI ON
TECHNICIAN
Person will be respon-
sible for maintenance
and repairs to semi
trailer refrigeration
units. Must have ability
to diagnose and repair
units, perform preven-
tative maintenance and
install new units. Prior
experience on Thermo
King and/or Carrier
units required with a
preference on having
certification.
Both positions are on
day shift and must
have own tools. We
offer a very clean work
environment and
newer model equip-
ment. Excellent com-
pensation and benefit
package.
Apply at:
Continental Express
Inc.
10450 St Rt 47
Sidney, OH 45365
800-497-2100
Or email resume to:
mgoubeaux@ceioh.co
m
HELP WANTED
Continental Express
Inc., a full service
transportation compa-
ny that specializes in
hauling refrigerated
food products is
recruiting for the follow-
ing positions:
FLEET MECHANIC
SUPERVISOR
Primary responsibility
will be overseeing work
being done by
Mechanics on semi
trailers including; pre-
ventative maintenance,
DOT inspections, gen-
eral repairs and new
trailer preparation. This
will be a hands-on,
working supervisor
position. Person must
have working knowl-
edge and experience
on tractor trailers.
Strongly prefer some-
one with prior supervi-
HELP WANTED
FREE food with every
puppy sold before
7/27/13. Poms, Dobes,
Chihuahuas, Morkies,
Shihtzus, more.
Garwick’s The Pet
People. 419-795-5711.
garwi ckst hepet peo-
ple.com.
PETS FOR
SALE
For sale: L-shaped
sofa sectional with
built-in Queen bed and
recliners, good condi-
tion $500 OBO.
Entertainment stand
$60 OBO. 419-394-
1598.
FURNITURE
FOR SALE
AUCTION SALE 702
Perry St., Wapak, OH.
Sat., July 20th at 10
AM. House at noon,
2007 Ford Taurus,
1986 Harley Davidson
FXRD, many tools,
antiques, collectibles,
and lots of household
misc.
L k
Here!
AUCTIONS
Free fill dirt from New
Bremen area. Contact
Bruns Building &
Development for more
information. 419-925-
4078.
FREE ITEMS
Used ping pong table
with new net and no
paddles. $25 Call
(419)738-4223
For Sale:
Antique Foot Locker
Call 419-300-4775
MISC. ITEMS
FOR SALE
Wapak
Rosewood and
Cinnamon
Friday 9-5
Tools, handmade
items, LOTS of clothing
children-plus size
adults, boys
Abercrombie, other
misc. items.
Wapak
807 Poppy
Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-?
Books, VHS Tapes,
toys, mens & womens
clothing, collectibles,
Christmas decorations,
lots of misc.
GARAGE SALES
Wapak
707 N. Water
Thurs-Fri. 8-5
Saturday 8-Noon
Washer/dryer, exercise
equipment, baby, dou-
ble stroller, tons of tod-
dler boys clothes, high-
chairs, tons of toys,
much more!
Wapak
7 Families on Canning
Factory Rd, 2 on the
corner of Kohler Rd.
and Canning Factory
Rd. Little of everything.
Look for the signs.
July 18-19, 8-6pm
July 20, 8-noon
Wapak
404 S. Blackhoof
Friday 9-5, Sat. 9-1
Household, ladies
plus-sizes, baby bed,
tools, misc.
Wapak
309 S. Blackhoof
Thurs.-Sat., 8:30-5
Porch/Yard Sale!
Antiques, collectables
clothes, toys, small
appliances, dishes,
pots, pans, much
more.
Wapak
24 E. Auglaize
Saturday 8-2
Check our window out!
Wapak
16676 Wapak
Cridersville Rd.
Friday 8-4
Miscellaneous cloth-
ing, baby clothes,
carseat, toys, glass
knick-knacks, some
furniture.
Wapak
15491 & 15117 Ramga
Rd.
Friday 9-4, Sat. 9-11
Household items,
antique furniture, name
brand kids clothing,
girls NB-8, boys NB-
4T, toys and miscella-
neous.
GARAGE SALES
Wapak
1414 Mohican
Fri.-Sat., 8-2pm
Baby items, toys
(Rescue Heroes,
Zhuzhu Pets), boys 8-
10, girls 6-8, girls room
decor, junior small,
womens plus, mens
XL, misc.
Wapak
14133 Infirmary Rd.
(between Wapak-
Cridersville Rd. and
railroad tracks)
Friday 8-5, Sat. 9-12
Multi-Family! Crib,
carseats, kids clothes,
toys, home decor,
including Home &
Garden
Wapak
1404 Commanche
Pass
Thurs. 8-4, Fri-Sat. 8-2
S n o w b l o w e r ,
Chiminea, toys, puz-
zles, books, holiday
decor, kitchen items,
mini refrigerator, craft
items, microwave, TV,
sewing machines,
frames.
Wapak
13080 Wrestle Creek
Rd.(4.5 miles east of
St. Johns on SR 333
then South. Signs post-
ed)
Friday 7/19 8:30-4.00
Saturday 7/20 8:30-12
Large 3 family garage
sale. Children, adult,
baby girl clothing.
Toys, glassware,
Precious Moments,
table, light, bathroom
sink & misc.
Wapak
1308 Mohican Trail
(across from WHS)
Friday 8am-6pm
as well as 9th ANNUAL
S U B D I V I S I O N
GARAGE SALE ONLY
Saturday 8am-3pm
boys 0-2yrs, plus size
clothing, misc.
GARAGE SALES
Wapak
121 N. Wagner
Thursday-Friday 9-4
Knick-knacks, Mary
MooMoo’s, kitchen
items, curio cabinet,
furniture, tires/chrome
rims, truck acces-
sories, priced to sell.
Wapak
115 North Rauthland
Ave
Fri.-Sat. 9-5
Bow mount trolling
motor, easy glider,
1940’s refrigerator,
Vegas style slot
machine, fishing poles
& tackle, and alot
more!
Wapak
113 N. Wagner Ave.
Thurs.-Fri.-Sat. 8-6
ESTATE SALE!
Highwheel weed
t r i m m e r ,
weedeaters, tools,
toys, records, some
antiques, some furni-
ture, household
items, lots of miscel-
laneous.
Wapak
107 S. Wagner
Thurs.-Fri. 9-4
Tools, TV’s, swimming
pool w/ladder, season-
al inflatables, clothes,
inflatable pool toys,
golf cart, fishing items,
misc.
Wapak
1002 Lima (Corner of
Rauthland/Lima
Thurs-Fri. 9-4, Sat. 8-?
Womens clothes, boys
clothes, scrubs, home
decor, games, toys,
TV, bedding, lots of
misc.
GARAGE SALES
St. Marys
810 S. Wayne
Thurs., Fri., Sat. 8-?
Multi-Family
Small furniture, misc.
household & decora-
tive items, clothing,
baby items
St. Marys
705 Kimberly Drive
Fri. & Sat. 9-4
Clothes, decor,
portable band saw,
tools, fishing gear,
microwave, bikes, toys,
variety of items!
St. Marys
402 S. Vine St.
Garage & Estate Sale
Thurs., Fri., Sat. 9-5
Jewelry, clothes, purs-
es, shoes, coats,
housewares, decora-
tive items, patio swing
HUGE GARAGE SALE
Minster K of C Hall
St. Augustine Mission
Commission
July 22, 5pm-9pm
July 23, 9am-9pm
July 24, 9am-7pm
Bag Day Wednesday
GARAGE SALES
Rubber Stamps,
Printing services. We
handle all types of cus-
tom printing and adver-
tising needs. See us
today! Wapakoneta
Daily News, 520
Industrial Dr.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio
45895. 419-738-2128.
Come To The
Wapakoneta Daily
News for your laminat-
ing needs. See us
today! Wapakoneta
Daily News, 520
Industrial Dr.,
Wapakoneta, Ohio
45895. 419-738-2128.
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Photo restoration: Do
you have old photos
that are torn or faded
or otherwise dam-
aged? Let me help pre-
serve your family's
heirloom and important
pictures. I will scan
your photo, then tweak
it via the computer, and
reprint an image for
you. Reasonable rates,
charged by the hour.
Contact John at 419-
738-1250 or via email
at jzwez@woh.rr.com
DAILY NEWS
W A P A K O N E T A
520 Industrial Dr.,
Wapakoneta, OH
419-738-2128
Various sizes
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from at...
NOTE
PADS
NOTICE
Investigate fully before
sending money as an
advance fee. For further
information, call or write:
Better Business Bureau
P.O. Box 269
Lima, OH 45802
419-223-7010
This notice provided as a
customer service by The
Wapakoneta Daily News.
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Lost
Beloved pet missing
around Hoopengarner
St. Female cat, 7 yrs.
old, ”Gracie”, black
w/some brown/white
around eyes.
REWARD! Call
(567)356-0425 leave
message.
LOST AND
FOUND
Notice
Lending
Opportunities
Borrow smart. Contact
the Ohio Division of
Financial Institutions’
Office of Consumer
Affairs BEFORE you
refinance your home or
obtain a loan.
BEWARE of requests
for any large advance
payment of fees or
insurance. Call the
Office of Consumer
Affairs toll free at 1-
866-278-0003 to learn
if the mortgage broker
or lender is properly
licensed. This notice is
a public service
announcement of the
Wapakoneta Daily
News.
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Getting Married?
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much much more.
520 Industrial Dr.,
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419-738-2128
PUBLIC
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Now Featuring Online Classifieds at
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All Classified Ads must be Pre-Paid on Personal Ads and on Commercial Ads
unless Prior Satisfaction credit has been established. Publisher reserves the
right to reject or cancel any advertisement at any time.
The Wapakoneta Daily News,
520 Industrial Dr., Wapakoneta, OH 45895
Phone: (419) 738-2128 Fax: (419) 738-5352
Get the Auglaize Advantage. All line ads published in both
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CLASSIFIEDS
T
h
e
W
a
p
a
k
o
n
e
t
a
D
a
i
l
y
N
e
w
s
4
1
9
-
7
3
8
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2
1
2
8
The
Wapakoneta Daily News
Advertise!
in a collision at 6:10 p.m. Tuesday at
South Blackhoof and West Benton
streets.
According to the report:
Robert Dietz, 57, of Botkins, was
driving a 2007 General Motors Si-
erra south on South Blackhoof Street
when he stopped for the stop sign at
the intersection with West Benton
Street.
Kylee Close, 32, of Spencerville,
who was driving a 1996 Plymouth
Voyager south behind Dietz failed to
come to a complete stop, causing the
front passenger side corner of Close’s
vehicle to strike the rear driver’s side
corner of Dietz’s bumper.
Close, who was driving 20 miles
per hour in a 25 mph zone at the time
of the collision, said she was distract-
ed due to her emotional state. She
was cited for failure to maintain an
assured clear distance ahead.
ceived the call, which he
knew was a scam, and
wanted the Sherif’s Of-
fce to be aware.
Werling said a woman
called saying she was with
the U.S. Governmen-
tal Grant Department
(USGGD) and that he
was eligible to receive a
free $9,000 grant. When
Werling called the wom-
an’s supervisor, the su-
pervisor said they would
send him the $9,000, if he
sent them a one-time pro-
cessing fee of $251.
Werling hung up on the
caller.
• Dispatchers received
a 911 hangup call from a
residence in the 100 block
of County Road 25A,
Cridersville, at 4:15 a.m.
Tuesday.
According to the re-
port:
A deputy responded
along with an of cer with
the Cridersville Police
Department and they
heard yelling in the house
upon their arrival.
A 43-year-old Lima
woman let the deputy and
of cer in and said she and
her 38-year-old female
cousin of the residence
had goten into an argu-
ment.
Te Lima woman said
she was packing her be-
longings and leaving with
her daughter afer her
cousin made a comment
about the Lima woman’s
grandson, which upset
her.
we would increase the likeli-
hood that these sites would be
cleaned up.”
Te average cost to clean
up a brownfeld site is approx-
imately $600,000. Te bill
would raise the remediation
grant level to $500,000 from
$250,000.
Te BUILD Act also would
make non-profts eligible for
assessment grants and would
allow the EPA to award multi-
purpose grants that include
multiple elements of a proj-
ect, including site inventory,
characterization, planning or
remediation for one or more
Brownfeld sites, Brown ex-
plained.
Tis should help speed up
redevelopment of the proper-
ty by streamlining and increas-
ing certainty of the clean-up
process for towns and munici-
palities. Te bill also provides
technical assistance for rural
communities and low-income
communities, as well as wa-
terfront sites and renewable
energy facilities.
Brownfelds, which typical-
ly have hazardous materials,
pollutants or contaminants
present, require clean-up be-
fore these abandoned or idled
parcels of industrial or com-
mercial land can be re-used.
Tey help economic develop-
ment by reducing blight and
relieving areas of environmen-
tally compromised land and
relieves pressure on undevel-
oped green spaces for future
development.
Greenfelds are undevel-
oped land that could be used
for development.
“By cleaning up previous
used sites, we can atract pri-
vate capital back into our cit-
ies by providing this incentive
to developers and businesses,”
Brown said. “Tis will help
us increase local tax revenue
and protect green spaces from
continuing development. Te
bill and brownfelds program
play an integral role in revital-
izing the areas surrounding
these brownfeld sites to meet
the kinds of environmental
and public health challenges
while spurring economic de-
velopment.”
No brownfeld sites are iden-
tifed in Wapakoneta. Ohio has
more than 250 sites registered
as brownfelds with the closest
to Wapakoneta being in Sidney,
Findlay and Dayton.
Since 1992, the EPA has
awarded nearly 140 grants to
Ohio communities for site as-
sessments, clean-up, revolving
loans, and job training.
Choked From Page 2A Brown
Barn From Page 2A
“By cleaning up
previous used sites,
we can attract private
capital back into our
cities by providing
this incentive to
developers and
businesses.”
– Sherrod Brown
CLASSIFIEDS
7B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
We work hard, we work fast, but we do the best quality work from
Cincinnati to Toledo. Whether we are installing mainline utilities
30’ deep, lift stations, concrete walls, bridges, sheet piling, or
moving dirt, VTF Excavation, LLC maintains a team environment
where safety, quality, and competitive motivation are our driving
force.
If you have this philosophy or know someone who does, apply
today. VTF is an equal opportunity employer offering competitive
wages and benefits based on experience. Looking for laborers,
team leaders, excavator, and pan operators. Those with experience
preferred but not required. Apply today at vtfexcavation.com or
send application to 8398 Celina Mendon Rd. Celina, OH 45822,
vtfexcavation@gmail.com. 419-586-5999 (Fax).
Interviews start immediately.
We work hard, we work fast, but we do the best quality work from
Cincinnati to Toledo. Whether we are installing mainline utilities 30’
deep, life stations, concrete walls, bridges, sheet piling, or moving dirt,
VTF Excavation, LLC maintains a team environment where safety,
quality, and competitive motivation are our driving force.
If you have this philosophy or know someone who does, apply today.
VTF is an equal opportunity employer ofering competitive wages
and benefts based on experience. Looking for laborers, team leaders,
excavator, and pan operators. Tose with experience preferred but not
required. Apply today at vtfexcavation.com or send application to 8398
Celina Mendon Rd. Celina, OH 45822, vtfexcavation@gmail.com.
419-586-5999 (Fax). Interviews start immediately.
Apply in Person at
520 Industrial
Wapakoneta
TODAY!!!
Students, Retirees,
Stay-At-Home Parents
Supplement your income!!
This is the job you
have been looking for!!!
What are the Benefits of an
Wapakoneta Daily News
newspaper route?
• Customer tips for good service
• Earn extra money selling
newspaper subscriptions
• Earn extra money for the
holidays
• Opportunity to meet the people
in your neighborhood
• Develop a regular exercise
schedule
NOW accepting
Carrier Route applications.
FOR THESE AREAS:
Cridersville
Wapakoneta
937-497-0011
Need Technology Help?
Sidney, Wapakoneta
and places in
between
Leave a message
I can help with just about anything
and at reasonable prices!
Have computer parts you want gone? I'll take anything!
AMISH CREW
Any carpentry, framing, siding,
roofing, garages, remodeling
Attention Farmers: Pole barns,
new barns, painting, repair work,
clean fence rows & ditch banks.
References & Reasonable
30 Years Experience 419-733-6309
COMMUNITY BOARD
Your connection to local businesses and services.
Place's Lawn Services
Lawn Mowing • Field Mowing
New Lawn Seeding • Lawn Renovations
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(419) 657-2298
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or Cell
419-852-2160
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Cleaning, sealing, staining. Barn painting.
Free estimate, insured, references.
Member: Better Business Bureau
M S I ENVIRONMENTAL
MIKE’S SANITATION INC.
We operate in compliance with the U.S. and Ohio EPA, State and
County Health Departments, ODA, ODOT and OSHA to provide our
customers and Neighbors with the most Responsible and Safe
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and PORTABLE TOILET RENTALS
Call 1-800-786-3691 for COMPETITIVE PRICING
J & M LAWN SERVICES
Specializing in Small to Medium Size Lawns
John & Michael Zwez
613 E Pearl St.
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Phone: 419-738-1250
Cell Phone: 419-234-6978
E-Mail: jzwez@woh.rr.com
Lawn Mowing & Trimming, Rototilling and Hedge Trimming
To advertise your
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as little as $2.55 per day
Call Deb in our Classified Department
at 419.738.2128
LOOKING FOR FAST FLAT
TV REPAIR? Call Us!
We Repair Lamps Too!
419-695-1229
HOHENBRINK TV
52 YEARS OF SERVICE 419-695-1229
11230 Elida Rd., Delphos www.hohenbrinktv.com
54 YEARS OF SERVICE
Hardwood Floor Refinishing & Installations
NO SANDING - NO MESS!
Insured - Free Estimates
Joe Cremonese
419-236-5867
First Floor
Construction LLC
First Floor
Construction LLC
McCullough Heating
& Air Conditioning
McCullough Heating
& Air Conditioning
419-953-2423
24 Hr. Service • Plumbing Issues • Electrical
Duct Work • Furnace Service & Installation
Air Conditioning Service & Installation
First Time Customers Get A 10
%
Discount!
SERVING WAPAKONETA &
SURROUNDING AREAS!
VOTED BEST PLACE TO BUY
ELECTRONICS 10 YEARS IN A ROW
by Readers of The Evening Leader
and the Wapakoneta Daily News
56 Years in
Business
WOW! FOWLER’S TV
Rent to Own 1/2 the cost of others • St. Marys
1 Block N. of Hospital,1301 E. Spring St. • 419-394-5316
Hours: M & F 9:30-8; T, W, TH 9:30-5:30, Sat. 9:30-3
WE SERVICE
WHAT WE SELL WELL
Or Due Down
$255.95
52 Payments of
$14.32/Week
CASINO SLOT MACHINE
$699.95 for home use!
Jim Hall
Roofing • Siding • Soffit • Facial • Concrete
Foundation Repair • Garages & Additions
All fencing • Custom decks
Insured - Free Estimates!
419-584-6776 (cell)
419-586-1862 (office)
30 YEARS EXPERIENCE!
TSB Construction
Building & Remodeling
419.235.2631
• Metal & Asphalt Roofs • Pole Barns
• Room Additions • Garage • Baths
• Kitchens • New Houses
30 Years Experience
The Village of
Waynesfield Council
passed the following
Ordinance and
Resolutions at the
Council Meeting held
on June 24, 2013.
Resolution 13-6-4 to
pay the bills presented;
Resolution 13-6-5 to
appoint Robert
Gryzbowski to serve as
Magistrate for the
Village of Waynesfield;
Ordinance 13-1-1 to
transfer funds. Copies
of these Resolutions
and Ordinances are
available for review in
their entirety at the city
building at 300 N.
Westminster St.
Judith Quinlan
Fiscal Officer
Village of Waynesfield
168
NOTICE OF FILING
ACCOUNT. IN THE
MATTER OF THE
TRUST CREATED
UNDER THE WILL
OF Theodore J Erb,
DECEASED. CASE
NO.: 1971 TW 33967
State of Ohio,
Auglaize County, ss.
Common Pleas Court
Probate Division.
Notice is hereby given
that an account and
vouchers have been
filed in this Court by
Charles W Erb,
Trustee of the Trust of
Theodore J Erb,
Deceased. Said
account has been sus-
pended for examina-
tion of the receipts and
disbursements togeth-
er with the invest-
ments, if any, shown
thereon. Any person
interested in said
account or any item
thereof may examine
said account prior to
September 04, 2013
when the same will be
approved and ordered
to record. Exceptions
shall be filed in writing
and a copy thereof
given to the Fiduciary
Five (5) days prior to
the above date of hear-
ing. July 12, 2013 Rob
C Wiesenmayer II,
Attorney MARK E.
SPEES, Probate
Judge.
168
Wapakoneta, Ohio,
7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Monday thru Friday.
Dennis Faller, Law
Director, City of
Wapakoneta, Ohio,
has approved this sum-
mary.
------------------------
On July 15, 2013,
Wapakoneta City
Council passed Ord
2013-22R, an
Ordinance making sup-
plemental appropria-
tions and declaring an
emergency.
A copy of this
Ordinance in its entire-
ty is available upon
request at the Office of
the Clerk of Council,
Wapakoneta City Hall,
701 Parlette Court,
Wapakoneta, Ohio,
7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Monday thru Friday.
Dennis Faller, Law
Director, City of
Wapakoneta, Ohio,
has approved this sum-
mary.
168-174
LEGAL NOTICES
CITY OF
WAPAKONETA
LEGAL NOTICE
On July 15, 2013,
Wapakoneta City
Council passed Ord
2013-21, an Ordinance
making supplemental
appropriations and
declaring an emer-
gency.
A copy of this
Ordinance in its entire-
ty is available upon
request at the Office of
the Clerk of Council,
Wapakoneta City Hall,
701 Parlette Court,
LEGAL NOTICES
Moped’s. New & Used.
Parts, service &
repairs. Lyle’s Moped’s
12th & Main St.
Delphos, (419) 692-
0249
MOPEDS
1986 Harley Davidson
FXRD, 91,000 miles,
for sale at auction Sat,
July 20th at 702 Perry,
Wapakoneta, OH. Sale
of house, Harley
Davidson, 2007 Taurus
Ford, and household
items begins at 10 AM.
MOTORCYCLES
For Sale: 2006 Toyota
Highlander. Call 419-
629-2259 if interested.
BOLD & SOLD! Is
what happens when
your ad stands out.
Only $1.00 additional
per word for bolding.
Call us now!
2007 Ford Taurus,
60,000 miles, for sale
at auction Sat, July
20th at 702 Perry,
Wapakoneta, OH. Sale
of house, 1986 Harley
Davidson FXRD, 2007
Taurus Ford, and
household items
begins at 10 AM.
AUTOS FOR
SALE
St. Marys
1 bedroom home,
CA/CH, 1 1/2 car
garage, small storage
building, corner lot.
Asking $32,000
419-394-8541
4 Bedroom, 2 bath, 2
story in Botkins. Totally
remodeled. 2700 sq.
ft., 2 car garage,
Storage Galore
$165,000 (937)693-
6801
HOMES FOR
SALE
St. Marys
213 Concord St. 3
Bedrooms, newly
remodeled, includes
appliances. Walking
distance to school. No
pets. 419-733-5493.
St. Marys
1 bedroom apartment
for rent, includes stove
and refrigerator.
References required.
No pets. 419-778-9670
Spacious 3 bedroom, 2
story duplex at 10 E.
Main in Wapak, wash-
er/dryer hookup, no
pets, $575/mo
(419)236-0683
One bedroom house in
Wapak very clean,
washer/dryer hook-up,
refrigerator and stove
provided. $375 month
call 419-773-4351
FOR
RENT
FOR RENT: LEASE
OPTION. 3 bedroom, 1
bath home with dry
basement, detached
two garage, new fur-
nace, central air &
water heater, fenced
yard. 836 W. Spring
St., St. Marys. Option
price $84,900. $1,500
down, $695 per month.
100% seller financing.
“Poor credit okay with
good income.”
419-953-0710
FOR RENT: LEASE
OPTION
3 bedroom, 2.5 bath
home with dry base-
ment, attached 2 car
garage, central a/c,
fireplace, fenced yard.
1824 Kingsbury Dr.
St. Marys
Option price $114,900,
$2,000 down or work
credit, $790 per month.
100% seller financing.
“Poor credit okay with
good income.” 419-
953-0710
2 bedroom, 1 bath
duplex located at 606
1/2 E. Auglaize St.
Wapak. $375 rent. Call
(419)236-0683
HOUSE FOR
RENT
Now Accepting
Applications
Beech Tree Hill
Apartments 416
Beech St.
St. Marys, Ohio 45885
419-394-5396
Mon. & Wed. 8:00 am-
4:30 pm or by appt.
2 bedroom apartments
with appliances fur-
nished. On site laundry
facility. Call for details
or pick up an applica-
tion at the rental office.
Possibility of rental
assistance. Equal
Housing Opportunity.
TDD#419-526-0466
“This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider, and employ-
er.”
Housing Opportunity
TDD#419-526-0466
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer.
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
St. Marys Senior
Village
800 Indiana Ave.
St. Marys, OH 45885
419-394-4230
Designated for 62
years of age or older,
handicapped/disabled,
regardless of age. Now
accepting applications
for our affordable 1
bedroom apartments.
Water, sewer & trash
removal included in
rent. Close to Council
on Aging & Shopping
Center. For applica-
tion, stop by office at
address above or call
number listed above.
Possibility of rental
assistance. Metro wel-
comed. Handicapped
accessible. Equal
St. Marys
Second floor apt.
Washer/dryer on site.
Hardwood floors. $375
+ utilities. Deposit and
references required.
419-629-3106
St. Marys
2139 Cambridge Court
2 bedrooms, bath, gas
heat, A/C, garage,
appliances included.
419-268-2477
Spacious, total electric
1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments in St. Marys.
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Pets accepted.
Deposit only $200.00
419-394-8509
Laurelwood and
Riverside 1 & 2 bed-
room furnished and
unfurnished apart-
ments, no pets, for
more information call
S c h l e n k e r
D e v e l o p m e n t s
(419)738-8111
Hotel Fort Barbee
100 1/2 W. Spring St.
St. Marys. OH 45885
A place to call home.
Great rent specials!
Efficiencies to one bed-
room. Come take a
closer look. For infor-
mation & application,
contact Michelle
Evans. 419-394-6705.
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
Anyone wanting to get
rid of appliances, grills,
lawnmowers, A.C.,
scrap metals, batter-
ies. Pick up FREE!
419-852-6086
WORK WANTED
GLM Transport hiring
for our regional fleet.
Safety, performance
and referral bonus pro-
grams. 401(k) and
direct deposit. Home
on weekends. Mileage
paid via PC Miler prac-
tical miles. Call (419)
238-2155 for details.
Drivers
WANTED
DRIVERS
The award winning
Howard Johnson Lima
is now accepting appli-
cations for Full-Time
M a i n t e n a n c e
Engineer and Part-
Time Front Desk
Clerk. If you are hard
working, dependable
and enjoy working in
the customer service
industry, this is the per-
fect opportunity for
you. We are Lima's
largest hotel with 150
guest rooms and
suites, over 5,000
square feet of event
space and
Rest aurant / Lounge.
Apply in person at
1920 Roschman Ave.
Lima, Ohio.
A
pply
N
o
w
!
A
pply
N
o
w
!
Lorain County
C o m m u n i t y
College invites
applications for the
following adjunct
instructor position:
O r a l
Communications-
CMMC 151
For position
description, visit
www.lorainccc.edu
/employment
An Affirmative
A c t i o n / E q u a l
O p p o r t u n i t y
Employer
HELP WANTED
STNAs
ST. MARYS LIVING
CENTER, has an
immediate opportu-
nity for full/part time
STNA’s 2nd shift,
shift differential.
Excellent benefits!
Please apply in per-
son to:
St. Marys Living
Center, HR
Manager
1209 Indiana Ave.
St. Marys, OH
45885
(419) 394-7611
E.O.E.
Conveniently locat-
ed across from St.
Marys Square!
APPLY
TODAY!!
HERE WE GROW
AGAIN!
Kerns Ford
We are looking for tal-
ented mechanics that
have the desire to join
a winning team.
Candidates must have
the ability to perform
diagnostics, repair and
maintenance repairs,
able to work in a busy
environment while
working well with oth-
ers. A valid clean driv-
ing record is required.
ASE Certification is a
plus but not necessary.
All brands accepted. ie.
GM, Chrysler, etc. If
you desire becoming
part of a winning team
please drop off a
resume at the Celina or
St. Marys location.
FENIX, LLC
Wapakoneta, OH
Production Team
Members
Seeking team mem-
bers who want to build
a career with our grow-
ing company. The ideal
candidate should be
highly motivated, excel
in team environments
and, have 3-5 years of
manufacturing experi-
ence. The plant oper-
ates on a 12-hour shift
basis with current
openings on the 7pm to
7am shift. We offer a
highly competitive
wage and full benefits.
Please send resumes
to:
HUMAN RESOURCES
319 S. Vine St.
Fostoria, OH 44830
Hairstylist wanted: Full
or Part time. Drop off or
mail resume to:
Reflections Hair Studio
109 W. Fayette
Celina, OH
HELP WANTED
NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY!
Someone to deliver
newspapers in New
Bremen. Can
e a r n b e t w e e n
$100.00 to $600.00
or more a month for
just a few hours a
day.
(Depending on the
number of deliver-
ies)
Apply in Person at:
The Evening Leader
102 E. Spring St.
St. Marys, Oh 45885
help
wanted
JT’s Brew and Grill
(across from Kroger)
now hiring: Kitchen (full
or part-time) over 18,
great for house wife;
Bartender over 19
w/experience, Pt.,
Weekend rotating; Day
Host (When school
starts) Apply in person-
Daily 9am to 11am ,
2pm to 5 pm or 8pm -
10pm Monday -
Thursday
Deliver Phone
Books Work Your
Own Hours, Have
Insured Vehicle,
Must be at Least 18
yrs. old, Valid DL. No
E x p e r i e n c e
Necessary. 1-800-
518-1333 x 224
www. del i ver t hep-
honebook.com
HELP WANTED
Are you reading this
ad right now?
See - The Classifieds
Work. Call us to place
your Classified ad
today! Don't forget to
ask about centering
your ad for even faster
results!
OPEN INTERVIEWS
Taco Bell Anna, OH
July 27th 10am – 4pm
Apply at tbelljobs.com
Now
HIRING
Part-time maintenance
person needed. Must
have own tools & trans-
portation. Experience
with plumbing, electri-
cal, drywall & roof
repair. 419-394-8509
Cement Monument
Sales- generous com-
missions
www.delphosgranite-
works.com job oppor-
tunities
Crew foreman and
worker with tree
removal experience
positions available.
Call (419)581-8199
May send their Cover
Letter and Resume to
the attention of Ben
Salazar by end of busi-
ness day Friday July
19, 2013
Ben Salazar
220 W. Livingston ST
RM B272
Celina, OH 45822
ben.salazar@mercer-
countyohio.org
Posted: 07/10/2013
HELP WANTED HELP WANTED
POSITION VACANCY
Position Title:
Workforce Investment
Act Fiscal Officer
Employment Status:
Full-time S a l a r y
Range: $43,160 - $54,
350
Following is a descrip-
tion of the responsibili-
ties and qualifications
for said position:
Job Responsibilities:
Under the general
supervision of the
Director of the
Workforce Investment
Act, this position as a
part of the One-Stop
system is responsible
for ensuring the fiscal
integrity and financial
performance of Ohio
Area 8 and it’s member
counties, by providing
support and recom-
mendations to the
Director, County
Commissioners and
Workforce Investment
Board regarding the
financial status of the
Workforce Investment
Act.
Qualifications:
A minimum of an
Associate Degree in
Accounting or related
field from an accredited
college or university.
Preferably a Bachelor’s
degree.
A minimum of three
years experience in an
accounting field.
Must have superior
operating knowledge of
Microsoft Word, Excel
or other spreadsheet
programs.
Ability to communicate
effectively in oral and
written form, including
the ability to speak
before an audience.
Qualified applicants
Advertise Here!
SUBSCRIBE
TODAY!
RICK’S 501 MOTORS
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES TO BUY A CAR
We Rent Cars,
Vans & SUVs!
MORE MINI VANS - ALL AT GREAT PRICES
TRUCKS ... TRUCKS ... TRUCKS!!!
CARS GALORE
2008 Chevrolet Impala LT2 .....................................3.9, V6 Automatic, Full Power - Runs Like New!
2006 Chevrolet HHR LT ..................................................Black, Moonroof, Chrome Wheels, Loaded
2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser ..........Silver, Loaded With Equipment, Low Low Miles - Only 59,000 Miles
2006 PT Cruiser Convertible ...............................Cool Vanilla Leather Interior and Looks Like New!
2008 Ford Fusion AWD .................................................V6, Loaded with Equipment - Priced To Sell!
2003 Honda Accord ..........4 Door, LX, Gold, Automatic, Air, Power Windows and Locks - Great Price!
2009 Hyundai Sonota ................................Limited, White, Leather, Moonroof, Automatic - Must See!
2009 Mercury Sable ..........................................Premier, White Suede, Every Factory Option Available
2005 Mercury Montego ................................Premier, Met. Gray, Loaded With Options - Check It Out!
2010 Nissan Altima .................................Automatic, Air, All of the Options you Expect - Priced To Sell!
2004 Pontiac Grand Prix GT2 .............Moonroof, Leather, All the Options - None Nicer Anywhere!
2010 Toyota Corolla S .................4 Door, Only 39,000 Miles and Drives Like A Dream - See It Today!
2004 Buick Lesabre Custom .......................................................V6 Automatic, Loaded and Clean!
2007 Chevrolet Cobalt ..........................................................2 Door, Automatic, Moonroof - Nice Car!
2006 Impala LTZ ............................................................................Grey with Leather and Every Option!
2002 Chrysler Concorde LX ............................................................Local Owner Trade - Must See!
2008 Buick Lucern ...................................................................Only 48,000 Miles, Leather - Like New!
2006 Dodge Stratus SXT .....................................................................Steal Blue, 4 Door, Automatic p g
CHRYSLER MINI VANS
2001 Chrysler Town & Country LX .................................................................Loaded with Options!
2006 Chrysler Town & Country ..............Black, Walter P. Chrysler Edition, Moon roof, DVD Player
2006 Chrysler Town & Country ..........Touring Edition, Only 77,000 Miles, Loaded with Equipment
2005 Town & Country LX ...................................................................................................Magnesium
2005 Dodge Grand Caravan SE Plus, Only 87,000 Miles, Loaded with Equipment - Let Us Help You Drive It Today!
2005 Dodge Grand Caravan ................Butane Blue, SE Plus - What A Buy On A Great Van! $7,982
2005 Ford Freestar ............................Limited, Leather, Quad Buckets, Rear DVD, Load and Low Miles
2002 Pontiac Montana SE .........................................Extended, White - Cleanest One You Will Find!
2007 Pontiac Montana SV6 ........................Mini Van - All The Seats - All The Equipment - Dark Blue
2005 Pontiac Montana Van AWA ..................................Loaded With Equipment And Ready To Go!
1998 GMC Safari Conversion Van ...........................What A Nice Van & What A Buy. . Only $3,967
1999 GMC Sierra 1500 ......Extended Cab, SLE, 2 Wheel Drive, Fibor Glass Cap, Power Everything, White
2007 Ford Ranger ........Regular Cab, Long Body, V6, Power Windows and Locks, Bright Red - $8,968
2006 Ford F-150 .............................Super Clean Cab, Dark Blue, Loaded, Hard To Find, 2 Wheel Drive
2003 Ford Ranger ...................................................Extended Cab, 4.0 V-6, Auto Matil Stopside Mt. Rd.
2008 Chevrolet Colorado ....Crew Cab, 4 Wheel Drive, Automatic, All Power - Priced Below Book $11,968
1999 Chevrolet 2500 .........Extended Cab, Long Bed, Lt. Trim, Leather, 6.0 Liter, Automative Loaded
2002 Dodge Dakota .....................................Crew Cab, V6, Automatic, Air, Power Windows and Locks
2006 Ford Ranger ....................Extended Cab, 4x4, Lever II, Black Automatic, Loaded With Equipment
y g , y , , q p g , y
GREAT SELECTION OF SUVS’ - READY TO PULL YOUR CAMPER OR BOAT TO THE LAKE!
2005 Dodge Durango SLT .......................................4WD, Moonroof, All 3 Seats and All Power Silver
2006 Chevrolet Trailblazer LT ..............................4WD, Moonroof, Looks Like New Inside and Out!
2006 Ford Escape XLT Sport .............4WD, Loaded with Equipment, Including Leather & Moonroof
2007 Ford Edge - Choice of 2 - One Is Burgundy with Cloth One Is Black With Leather And A Moonroof
2008 Kia Sorento EX ............................4WD, Maroon With Cloth Interior, Really Clean & Ready To Go!
2006 Mitsubishi Outlander ES ...........................4WD, Loaded, Stop and Drive This Beauty Today!
2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer LT ..............................4WD, Great Equipment - Stop By For A Test Drive!
2005 Renegade ...................................................................................................Black, All Power Loaded
2007 Sport ................................................................................................White, Only 60,000 Miles, Clean
2006 Sport ....................................................................................................Black 4WD - Looks Like New!
2003 Sport Freedom Edition .................................................................Looks and Drives Like New!
JEEP LIBERTIES ★ ★ ★ ★
RICK’S
MOTORS
Located on Rt. 501,
one block south of Redskin Trail.
419-738-1501
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IT
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0
1
APPLY FOR YOUR CAR LOAN
FROM YOUR COUCH!
GO TO RICKS501MOTORS.COM!
TRADE-INS
GLADLY
ACCEPTED!
CARS GALORE
TRUCKS TRUCKS TRUCKS
JEEP LIBERTIES
MINI VANS
2001 Chrysler Town & Country
LX Loaded With Equipment - SPECIAL $5,982
2006 Chrysler Town & Country
Walter P. Chrysler Edition, Leather & Moonroof
$8,969
2006 Chrysler PT. Cruiser Convertible
6T Package, Automatic, Air $7,989
1998 GMC Safari Conversion Van
Very Clean, You Must See This One! $3,492
2007 Jeep Liberty Sport
Loaded With Equipment What A Buy @ $10,868
2002 Pontiac Montana Extended Van
Loaded and Very Clean ONLY $5,962
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A
LL V
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ON THE SPOT
GUARENTEED CREDIT APPROVAL
8B
Wapakoneta Daily News
Thursday, July 18, 2013
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
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