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Fall Car Care

Unpublished

October 14, 2013

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Bang For
Your Buck
Extend your vehicle’s
life expectancy
Sopping Wet
Cars can spring a leak
for a varity of reasons
Winterizing
Vehicles
Improve vehicle performance
Car
a special supplement to
October 2013
&
CARE
F
a
l
l
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 2
Did you
know?
According to the most
recent information from
forecaster TrueCar.com,
the average price for a
new car or light truck
is $30,303. Tis fgure
represents a roughly
$1,200 increase from
2011. People looking to
get a deal by purchasing
a used car won’t fnd
much relief, as even
used car prices have
increased. But people
trading in a used car for
a new one may be able
to get more money on
the trade-in or sale of
a used car than in the
past, which should help
to defray some of the
cost of the more pricey
newer model.
As fall gradually gives
way to winter, vehicle own-
ers ofen sigh at the thought
of driving in winter weath-
er or spending weekday
mornings clearing their ve-
hicles of ice before heading
to the of ce. But manning
the wheel through another
snowstorm or whitling
away another night’s worth
of ice from a car’s wind-
shield are not the only rites
of passage motorists must
endure as cold weather re-
turns.
Winterizing a vehicle
can improve vehicle per-
formance during a time
of year that, in many lo-
cales, can be especially
harsh on automobiles.
Low temperatures make
for less than ideal condi-
tions for engines to run,
while potholes lef behind
by snow plows can damage
a vehicle’s wheels and may
even result in fat tires and
a damaged suspension sys-
tem. In addition, salt used
to improve traction on
roadways can cause rust.
Short of moving to a locale
with mild winters, there’s
litle drivers can do to pro-
Winterizing
vehicles an
important step
for drivers
Keeping tools like a snow brush or ice scraper in
the trunk of a vehicle is one way to ready a car
for the winter months ahead.
Standard Hitches &
5th Wheel Hitches
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itch
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Coldwater, Ohio
419-678-2397
LEFELD
613 N., Dixie Hwy. • Wapak
419-738-2195 • www.clarkfordsales.com
CLARK FORD
YES!
We Do
BODY WORK
ON MOST MAKES & MODELS
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 3
tect their vehicles from
harsh winter weather. But
winterizing a vehicle can
prevent some of the more
common issues drivers
may encounter when the
temperatures dip below
freezing.
* Take time out for your
tires. Winter weather can
limit traction, puting the
safety of drivers and their
passengers in jeopardy.
When possible, avoid driv-
ing in the snow, and steer
clear of roads where ice
and black ice are known to
form.
While such measures
can greatly reduce your
risk of being in an accident,
you likely can’t avoid driv-
ing entirely come the win-
ter. Drivers who want im-
proved traction from their
tires throughout the winter
can purchase winter tires
for their vehicles. Such
tires can more efectively
handle roads that are cov-
ered in snow and ice than
all-season tires. Another
way to improve traction
during the winter months
is to constantly monitor
tire pressure, which de-
creases more rapidly when
the weather is cold. Prop-
erly infated tires provide
beter traction and protect
against damage that may
occur when driving over
potholes.
* Consider a low-viscos-
ity oil in the winter. Te
owner’s manual of your
vehicle may recommend
you use a lower viscosity
motor oil to counter the
dip in temperature that’s
synonymous with winter.
When the temperatures
outside fall, the oil inside
your vehicle thickens, and
a thicker oil won’t circu-
late through the engine as
well. Tis can cause engine
problems because the en-
gine won’t be adequately
lubricated. A low-viscosity
oil is naturally thinner, so
it may improve lubrication
throughout the winter.
Te vehicle owner’s man-
ual should recommend
oils based on climate. If
not, talk to your mechanic
about changing from the
oil you use throughout the
year to a low-viscosity al-
ternative during the winter.
* Inspect your vehicle
before winter arrives. No
one wants to be out on
the road during the frst
snowstorm of the year only
to discover certain com-
ponents are not working
properly. Belts and hoses,
while durable, can be put
through strenuous condi-
tions during the winter
months, so a close inspec-
tion of belts and hoses
should be conducted in
late fall. In addition, wind-
shield wipers are especially
important in winter, when
snowfall can drastically
impact visibility. You will
want your wipers working
at full capacity once the
winter begins, so replace
older wipers (shelf life for
standard wipers is typically
one year) and use a de-ic-
i ng wi ndshi el d washer
See WINTERIZING,
Page 4
According to data from
TrueCar.com, in 2012
the average new car cost
$30,500. Tat’s a consid-
erable expense, especially
at a time when fuel costs
remain high and cost of liv-
ing continues to rise.
Because new cars have
become so expensive,
more and more vehicle
owners are looking for
ways to extend the life of
their vehicles. Te longer
a car can stay on the road,
the beter an investment
that vehicle becomes. For-
tunately, there are several
steps vehicle owners can
take that should ensure
their vehicles stay on the
road for years to come.
* Scale back on short
trips. Te toll cold starts
take on a vehicle can add
up over time. When a car
is started, condensation
builds up in the vehicle’s
exhaust system. On longer
trips, that condensation
will gradually evaporate.
However, on short trips,
that condensation ofen
does not have enough time
to evaporate, and over time
too many short trips will
lead to an accumulation of
water in the muf er that
can lead to rust and rust
holes on the muf er. Short
trips also can negatively
afect gas mileage. When
possible, leave your car at
home on trips into town
when you can just as easily
walk or ride a bicycle. Over
time, reducing the amount
of short trips you take in
your car will greatly reduce
wear and tear on your vehi-
cle and improve your fuel
ef ciency as well.
* Stick to the manu-
facturer’s recommended
maintenance schedule.
Adhering to your vehicle’s
maintenance schedule
serves many purposes,
including improving the
its durability and protect-
ing various components,
including its cooling sys-
tem and drivetrain. While
many manufacturers used
to recommend changing
a vehicle’s oil every 3,000
miles, many of today’s
newer automobiles need
t hei r oi l changed l es s
See EXTEND LIFE,
Page 5
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 4
fuid to maximize visibil-
ity.
Another component
that must be inspected is
your car’s batery. Many
drivers have experienced
a dead batery, which, in
warm weather, is more of
a nuisance than a health
concern. In cold weather,
a dead batery can threat-
en your health if you fnd
yourself stranded in cold
weather. Especially low
temperatures can com-
promise a batery’s pow-
er by as much as 50 per-
cent, so have your batery
inspected in late fall and
replace it if need be.
* Don’t be caught of
guard. Part of winter-
izing a vehicle is being
prepared if the vehicle
breaks down. Make sure
you have extra washer
fuid in your vehicle’s
trunk, and don’t forget
to include an ice scraper,
snow brush or even a
snow shovel in the trunk
as well. A snow shovel
may be necessary if you
need to dig your car out
if it’s been buried some-
where other than your
driveway. Other items to
carry in your trunk in-
clude a blanket, a change
of clothes, an extra hat,
an extra pair of gloves,
some nonperishable
food, and a few botles of
water.
Winter can be espe-
cially harsh on automo-
biles. But drivers can
take several preventive
steps to ensure their ve-
hicle is safe and sound on
the roads this winter.
Winterizing
From Page 1
Simple ways
to extend the life
of your vehicle
Keeping a vehicle’s interior
clean can make it more
enjoyable to drive while
encouraging owners to
keep their cars for longer
periods of time.
get ready for winter!
419-394-2371
1-800-688-BUDS
1415 Commerce Dr., St. Marys
www.budschevy.com
Replace Wiper Blades............
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Coolant Fush w/Extended
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Valid On Most Makes & Models!*
$20 Mail-In Brake Rebate
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$10 Mail-In Lube Oil & Filter Rebate
(exp. 11/29/13)
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 5
frequently. Check your
owner’s manual for manu-
facturer recommendations
regarding oil changes, and
don’t forget to replace the
oil flter when changing
your vehicle’s oil.
* Pay atention to brake
pads. Brake pads that are
allowed to wear down
can cause damage to the
brakes’ rotors and calipers.
Tat damage can prove
costly and make things
harder on your vehicle.
Keep an eye on your vehi-
cle’s brake pads, which are
far less expensive to replace
than rotors and calipers,
and do not allow them to
wear down to metal.
* Keep your tires prop-
erly infated. Tires that are
under-infated will nega-
tively impact your vehicle’s
fuel ef ciency. In addition,
the tires’ life expectancy
is reduced considerably
when tires are not properly
infated. Routinely check
your tire pressure, espe-
cially if you drive a lot, and
keep tires infated at the
pressure recommended
in your vehicle’s owner’s
manual.
* Be mindful when fll-
ing up your tank. Many
people do not pay much at-
tention to their surround-
ings when pulling into the
flling station. But when
you fll up can impact your
car’s life expectancy. Per-
haps the worst time to fll
your tank is when the fuel
tanker is in the gas station
reflling the underground
tanks. Tat’s because the
process of flling the un-
derground tanks can stir
up sediment that had set-
tled at the botom of those
tanks. If that sediment
fnds its way into your ve-
hicle’s gas tank, it can clog
flters and fuel injectors
and negatively afect the
vehicle’s performance. So
unless your car is running
on empty, avoid reflling its
gas tank when the tanker is
still in the station.
* Take care of your ve-
hicle’s interior, too. Caring
for a car is not just about
being good to what’s un-
der the hood. Caring for
the car’s interior will not
necessarily impact its per-
formance, but a well-kept
interior will improve how
you look at your vehicle
and how much you enjoy
driving it. Te longer you
enjoy driving your vehicle,
the longer you are likely
to keep it. Preserve the ve-
hicle’s door and window
seals; clean the dashboard,
including the gauges, vac-
uum the foor mats; and
wipe down the vehicle’s
interior, whether it’s cloth
or leather. Keeping up the
appearance of the car’s
interior will make the ve-
hicle more enjoyable to
drive and increase its value
at resale.
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T & P AUTO BODY
and PAINT CENTER, INC.
Shop Equipped With Continental Frame Equipment
419-394-6574
317 South Park Drive • St. Marys
Have you seen this lately?
Extend Life From Page 4
Very ofen drivers fnd
that the seats or the mats
below their feet are damp
or downright sopping wet.
But unless a window or
sunroof was lef open dur-
ing a rainstorm, drivers
may fnd it dif cult to deci-
pher why their vehicles are
suddenly soaked.
Unfortunately, when
a vehicle’s interior is wet,
that could be a sign of a sig-
nifcant problem, one that
can gradually worsen over
time. Wetness can cause
electrical components or
metal structures in the car
to rot, and a soggy interior
may eventually be over-
come by mold. It is best
to fnd out what is causing
the leak as soon as possible
and have the problem fxed
just as quickly.
Finding the source of
a leak is not always easy.
Sometimes drivers can lo-
cate it themselves and then
fx the problem on their
own, while more serious
problems might need to be
handled by a professional.
But it is best to assess the
situation before booking
an appointment with your
mechanic.
Cars can spring a leak
for a variety of reasons.
See LEAKY, Page 6
Diagnosing a leaky car
Leaks from systems under
the hood, as well as rain-
water or water from wash-
ing the car, can infltrate
the interior if seals around
doors and/or windows are
broken or gaskets are worn
out. Figuring out which
type of liquid is entering
your vehicle can help you
determine what’s behind
the leak.
A clear, slippery liquid
under the seats may be
indicative of a leak in the
brake fuid reservoir. Brake
fuid is a liquid used in the
braking system to apply
hydraulic pressure from
the master cylinder to the
calipers to the pads against
the wheel drums. If you
discover brake fuid, check
the master cylinder or the
clutch master cylinder to
see if there is a leak or spill-
over of the fuid.
Coolant also can leak
under the dashboard and
into the foot wells of a car.
Coolant is a sticky, green
and sweet-smelling fuid,
and a coolant leak could
mean that a heater core or
hose in the cooling system
is leaking. In such instanc-
es, hoses may need to be
replaced.
Some vehicles have wa-
ter diverters on the sides of
their windshields to make
sure water fows of of the
windshield when the wip-
ers are in use. Also, the
trough where the wipers
rest should have a sealant
that prevents water from
entering at the base of the
windshield. Over time,
both can wear out and may
need to be replaced and re-
sealed. Try siting in the car
on a dry day and spraying
a hose on the windshield.
See if any water eventually
makes it inside of the car.
If it does, the windshield is
likely the reason your vehi-
cle’s interior is geting wet.
A clogged drain in a
vehicle’s heating, ventila-
tion and air conditioning
system is one of the more
common causes of interior
water damage. If the drain
is clogged, condensation
from the system cannot
drain from the tube. In
such instances, water backs
up into the system and can
actually blow out of the car
vents or elsewhere in the
vehicle, forming a pool on
the foor of the car. Leaves
or debris can cause a block-
age. If excess water is lef in
the HVAC system, it can
damage the blower motor.
Also, a faulty seal that is lo-
cated between the HVAC
case and the frewall of the
vehicle may cause water
to leak into the passenger
compartment under the
carpet.
In some cases, clean-
ing blocked drains in a ve-
hicle’s HVAC system may
be as simple as blowing
compressed air through
the vents or using a wire
to clear out leaves or dirt.
Other times it may be hard
to access the leaks, and
such instances are ofen
best lef to a mechanic.
Te causes of leaks in a
car are not always so easy
to diagnose. But it is im-
portant to fgure out where
the water is coming from
early on to minimize the
damage water can do to
your vehicle.
Leaky From Page 5
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 6
After taking a vehicle through the car wash, drivers may
notice a leak inside the car.
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Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 7
Did you
know?
According to a
report from the
Federal Highway
Administration titled
“Long-Life Concrete
Pavements in Europe
and Canada,” a
portion of Ontario
Highway 401 is the
busiest road in North
America, with average
daily traf c of more
than 425,000 vehicles.
I-405 in Los Angeles,
Calif., is the busiest
American freeway,
with around 380,000
vehicles traveling
daily on it, closely
followed by I-75,
which runs through
Atlanta, Ga.
Many people aspire to
live more eco-friendly life-
styles. And while those
same people may think
driving less is one way to
accomplish that goal, mo-
torists can take steps to be
more eco-friendly when be-
hind the wheel.
Electric cars have been
touted as eco-friendly al-
ternatives to traditional
vehicles, but such cars are
still beyond the budgets
of many vehicle owners,
and the fuctuating prices
of electricity make electric
cars bargains for some driv-
ers but costly expenditures
for others. Tose fuctuat-
ing prices, which depend
on geography and a host
of other factors, can make
it dif cult to determine the
true cost of owing an elec-
tric vehicle. But electric cars
are not the only way drivers
can go green.
* Look for vehicles made
with recycled materials.
Some vehicle manufactur-
ers have begun to equip
their vehicles with recycled
components. Much like
they might emphasize recy-
cled materials when shop-
ping for groceries or home
furnishings, eco-friendly
consumers can look for a
vehicle that includes re-
cycled materials among its
features.
* Prioritize vehicle main-
tenance. Ensuring a vehicle
is well-maintained is both
practical and eco-friendly.
Properly infated tires im-
prove fuel ef ciency, as
poorly infated tires make it
harder for engines to oper-
ate at full capacity, forcing
them to work harder and
waste fuel in the process.
Vehicles run more ef cient-
ly when owners adhere to
their recommended main-
tenance schedules, so own-
ers should familiarize them-
selves with the maintenance
guidelines recommended in
their owners’ manuals. Do-
ing so can improve fuel ef-
fciency, reduce potentially
harmful emissions and save
drivers money over the lives
of their vehicles.
* Stay steady on the road
and obey the speed limit.
When driving, drivers who
maintain a steady speed and
obey the speed limit can
save more fuel than drivers
who constantly accelerate
and decelerate. Pumping
the accelerator sends more
fuel into the engine, drasti-
cally reducing fuel ef cien-
cy as a result. Obeying the
speed limit can also reduce
their fuel consumption, as
driving as litle as 10 miles
per hour more than the
speed limit can reduce fuel
ef ciency. When possible,
maintain a safe and steady
speed.
* Avoid heavily traf cked
roads. Heavily traf cked
roads tend to feature lots of
stop-and-go driving, which
reduces fuel ef ciency
while puting more and tear
on vehicles. When possible,
stick to roads with less traf-
fc. Such roads are not only
beter for your vehicle, but
also less stressful on drivers.
* Clear your vehicle of
unnecessary items. Cars
have a tendency to become
rolling closets. Te longer
drivers own their vehicles,
the more personal items
See DRIVING, Page 8
Driving with the
environment in mind
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301 S. Walnut Street • Celina • 419-586-5166
Properly inflated tires can
improve fuel efficiency,
benefitting the environment
and saving drivers money
at the gas pump.
those vehicles seem to col-
lect. Golf clubs, bowling
balls, kids’ strollers, and
other personal items should
be removed from vehicles
when making trips during
which such items won’t be
used. Te heavier a vehicle
is, the harder its engine must
work, and the more fuel that
engine consumes as a result.
Drivers can dramatically
improve their vehicles’ fuel
ef ciency by resisting the
temptation to use those ve-
hicles as storage closets.
Driving is rarely seen
as an eco-friendly activity.
However, drivers can still
take steps to reduce their
carbon footprints when out
on the road.
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 8
Driving
From Page 7
Winter weather is just
around the corner, leaving
some drivers wondering
if their two-wheel-drive
vehicles can handle roads
covered in snow and ice.
Now is the time people
fock to car and truck deal-
erships to trade in their
cars for something with a
litle more power and trac-
tion and also to take ad-
vantage of end-of-season
pricing. When faced with
an array of vehicles boast-
ing four-wheel-drive and
all-wheel-drive, consumers
ofen wonder about the dif-
ferences between the two
options or if there is any
diference at all. Tough
similar, four-wheel-drive
and all-wheel-drive are not
quite the same.
Four-wheel-drive sys-
tems, ofen referred to as
4WD, trace their origins
to the late 1800s, while
all-wheel-drive, or AWD,
did not arrive until the late
1970s, when an AWD sys-
tem was used on an Audi
vehicle for rally racing.
Now many cars and trucks
come with 4WD or AWD,
particularly crossovers and
SUVs.
Both drive systems
engage all four wheels at
the same time to provide
more traction. On AWD
systems, the powering of
the wheels is automatic
and usually handled by the
electronic system of the
car. Some vehicles drive in
two-wheel-drive, but then
engage AWD when sen-
sors detect a need for more
traction and maneuverabil-
ity. When operating 4WD
vehicles, drivers may have
to manually engage the
system. True 4WD uses a
transfer case mounted by
the rear of the transmis-
sion. A buton or selector
lever on older model SUVs
would switch the vehicle
from 2WD to 4WD. Unlike
in AWD systems, the front
and rear axles are locked
together in 4WD systems.
Four-wheel-drive sys-
tems are beter for of-
roading, rock-climbing
and driving through mud
and water. Individuals who
participate in many of-
road recreational activities
will fnd that 4WD, espe-
cially in vehicles with more
gears, is more efective and
provides beter traction.
All-wheel-drive provides
stability, largely on road-
ways, and enables the ve-
hicle to modify the level of
power to either the front
or rear wheels to improve
traction as needed. All-
wheel-drive is adequate
See DIFFERENCE,
Page 9
What’s the difference
between AWD and 4WD?
421 N. Eastern Ave.
St. Henry, OH 45883
Joe Bruggeman • Owner
“Specializing in Truck Accessories
& Collision Repair”
(419) 678-4530
1-800-441-0826
All-wheel-drive
and four-
wheel-drive
systems
are similar,
but the latter
is preferable
when driving
off-road.
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 9
for many drivers and situ-
ations.
It is important to note
that, on icy or slippery
roads, neither AWD or
4WD systems assist with
braking or completely pre-
vent cars from skidding
on slick surfaces. Having
the ability to engage all
four wheels at the same
time should not be used
as a replacement for cau-
tious driving in inclement
weather.
Four-wheel-drive and
all-wheel-drive both pro-
vide power to all four
wheels on the vehicle but
have subtle diferences
that make each beter for
certain driving conditions.
Difference
From Page 8
Vehicles have to share
roadways equally, but
some vehicles tend to take
up more space and make
motorists more nervous
than others. Anyone who
has traversed a freeway has
ridden alongside trucks.
More than 70 percent of
accidents involving trucks
are the fault of the other
vehicle, according to a
study from the U-M Trans-
portation Research Insti-
tute that analyzed national
crash data on fatal two-ve-
hicle accidents involving
a heavy truck. Accidents
involving large trucks fre-
quently result in injuries.
Ensuring everyone’s safety
means knowing some of
the rules of the road when
trucks are present.
BLIND SPOTS
Experienced drivers
know the advantages of
defensive driving tech-
niques, especially when
riding alongside tractor-
trailers. Despite their larg-
er side view mirrors, large
trucks have much larger
blind spots than standard
cars, and knowing about
blind spots is a great way
to avoid accidents involv-
ing tractor-trailers. Avoid
driving on the right side
of the truck in the front
or rear of the vehicle. Te
middle-lef side of the
truck is another spot to
avoid, as trucks merging
into lanes may not be able
to see you when you are on
the lef fank of the truck.
Similarly, trucks are typi-
cally required to drive in
the right lane of highways
and will be changing lanes
frequently to get back into
the right lane. Because
passing on the right is not
allowed, driving in blind
spots in the right lane can
be dangerous for standard-
size cars.
MERGING
As mentioned, the
middle of an 18-wheeler
is a large blind spot, as is
directly behind the truck.
When trucks are merg-
ing into the roadway, give
them plenty of space. You
can fash your high beams
to alert the truck that you
are slowing down and al-
lowing the driver to cross
in front of your car. Oth-
erwise, move over into an
open lane to give him a
wide berth.
LEAVE PLENTY
OF ROOM
Give tractor-trailers
plenty of room when sharing
See SAFELY, Page 10
Driving safely around trucks
Oil Change, Four-Tire Roatation,
27-Point Vehicle Inspection
Dexos1 Synthetic Blend
After $10.00 Mail In Visa Card Rebate
Excludes full synthetic oil and diesel engines.
More than six quarts of oil, balancing tires
and tax extra. Includes oil specified by the
vehicle Owner’s Manual, including dexos1
synthetic blend for 2011 and newer vehicles.
See dealer for eligible vehicles and details. .
Not valid with other offers. Price may vary for
some models. Plus tax.
Expiration Date: 11/30/13
Cooling System Service
Inspect condition of all hoses, clamps and
belts. Pressure test system. Inspect radiator
and water pump for proper operation.
Plus tax, if applicable. Not valid with other
offers. Coupon valid at vehicle check-in.
Plus tax.
Expiration Date: 11/30/13
Certified Service Certified Service
$28.95 $89
Certified Service
SERVICE HOURS
Monday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday CLOSED
Sunday CLOSED
218 S. WALNUT ST. CELINA, OH
1-800-686-2234
1-800-98-CHEVY
419-586-2385
www.kernschevyolds.com
the roadways. Tire blowouts
on such trucks are quite com-
mon, as carrying heavy loads
can put a lot of stress on tires.
Blowouts send shards of
heavy rubber into the air and
roadway and can cause the
trucker to swerve. Te more
space you leave between your
vehicle and the truck, the less
likely you are to be involved
in a blowout-related accident.
Another thing to keep in
mind is that trucks have a
large amount of surface area
that can be blown around by
the wind. Trucks can be dif-
fcult to control in the wind.
Terefore, leave extra room
on windy days; otherwise,
you could fnd a truck drifing
into your lane.
WIDE TURNS
Trucks need to make wide
turns to clear curbs and road-
side items. Terefore, truck
drivers need to swing lef
before making right turns.
Very ofen the driver will not
be able to see cars next to
his trailer. Te right side of a
truck can be extremely dan-
gerous and has far more blind
spots than the driver’s side of
the vehicle.
DON’T STOP
SUDDENLY
A truck traveling behind
you cannot stop and maneu-
ver as quickly as a passenger
vehicle. Try not to hit the
brakes to avoid an obstacle
in the road, or you may have
a semi barreling into the
rear of your vehicle. Accord-
ing to information from the
site Drive Safely, trucks fully
loaded may take as much as
the length of three football
felds to come to a complete
stop when driving at 60 miles
per hour.
PASS QUICKLY
When passing a large
truck, do so only on the lef
and do it as quickly as pos-
sible. Tis way you move
out of the truck’s blind spots
promptly and avoid geting
caught in a situation with a
truck coming into your lane
because the driver doesn’t see
you.
PRCTICE SELF-
PRESERVATION
Trucks are much larger
than cars, and a collision with
a truck can result in the car
being trampled by the tires
or sliding underneath the rig.
Te Insurance Institute for
Highway Safety reports that
70 percent of fatalities in ac-
cidents involving a car and a
truck were people in cars and
not trucks. Do whatever you
can to steer clear of trucks
and give them plenty of room,
even if and when truck driv-
ers are in the wrong. It could
mean the diference between
a pleasurable road trip and a
potentially fatal accident.
TRUCKS TRY TO
MAINTAIN SPEED
When on roadways it can
take a while for a truck to
reach a cruising speed. Tere-
fore, drivers will usually do
what they can to remain at
that speed. Otherwise the
trickle-down-efect of brak-
ing could mean losing pre-
cious momentum, causing a
backup on the roadway and
wasting expensive fuel. Tere-
fore, a trucker will try to avoid
hiting the brakes and could
swerve quickly into a lef lane
to avoid a merging car. Truck-
ers usually hold their speed
and let the cars around them
adjust, which could make for
some scary moments.
Trucks also may have
speed governors between 60
and 65 miles per hour. In such
instances, they cannot move
as fast when passing around
other trucks and cars. If a
truck seems like it is pacing
another truck or car, it could
just be because it is at max
speed and the terrain doesn’t
allow the truck to pass efec-
tively. Patience is key in this
situation.
Driving with trucks re-
quires drivers sharing the
roadways with trucks to be
more cautious and courte-
ous. Cars are much more
maneuverable than trucks,
not to mention much more
susceptible to damage in an
accident.
Safely From Page 9
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 10
No Appointment Needed
(most cars)
PENNZOIL
FULL SERVICE
LUBE & OIL CHANGE
up to 5 qts.
$
36
.45
+ tax
OVER 149,000
Vehicles Serviced
Get ready for winter!
We sell & install
Batteries
Stay in the comfort
of your car!
Many drivers will expe-
rience a fat tire at some
point in their lives. Flat
tires can be a nuisance, es-
pecially if a fat leaves you
stranded on the side of an
empty road with litle op-
portunity for passing traf-
fc to help you. Knowing
how to change your own
tire can keep you from sit-
ting on the side of the road
waiting for a tow truck or
fellow motorist.
Tere is no need to feel
helpless when your vehicle
gets a fat tire. Changing
a fat tire is relatively easy
and can take just a few
minutes if you are prepared
and know how to get the
job done.
1. Turn on your emer-
gency fashing hazard
lights and pull the car safe-
ly over to the side of the
road where you will not be
in the path of traf c.
2. Try to fnd a level, sta-
ble surface so that the car
will not roll.
3. Put the car in park
and engage the emergen-
cy brake. Place bricks or
wooden blocks under the
tires on the opposite side
to prevent the car from
rolling.
4. If you have cones or
fares, use them to make
your vehicle more visible
to fellow motorists. Tis
can save you from being
struck while changing the
fat.
5. Connect the jack han-
dle to the rest of the de-
vice. Slide the jack under a
secure part of the car frame
near the damaged tire.
6. Use a screwdriver to
pry of the wheel cover or
remove the hub cap to gain
access to the lug nuts on
the tire.
7. Use your tire wrench
to fnd the side of the
wrench that matches the
size of the lug nuts. Turn
the wrench counterclock-
wise to loosen all the nuts.
Loosen them until they
can comfortably be re-
moved all the way by hand.
8. Use long strokes when
pumping the jack to reduce
the efort you have to put.
Lif the car up until the
wheel clears the ground.
9. Remove the lug nuts
and store them in a safe
spot until later. Grasp the
fat tire with both hands
and pull it toward you un-
til it clears the ends of the
bolts. Roll the fat to the
rear of the vehicle.
10. Lif the spare tire
into place and slide it in
completely over the bolts.
11. Replace the lug nuts
and tighten them by hand.
12. Carefully lower
the vehicle and remove
the jack. Tighten the lug
nuts completely with the
wrench. Ten replace the
wheel cover.
13. Put the fat in the
trunk for proper disposal
or repair later on.
14. Remove the blocks
from your tires and disen-
gage the emergency brake.
You should now be
ready to get back on the
road.
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 11
For All Your
Automotive Needs!
1950 Haveman Rd.
Celina, Ohio
419-586-3777
1257 Bellefontaine Ave.
Wapakoneta, Ohio
419-738-0474
Did you
know?
According to AutoGuide.
com, the Toyota Corolla
is the number one
selling vehicle of all
time. Since production
on the Corolla began
in 1966, the Japanese
automaker’s beloved sedan
has sold more than 37.5
million units. While its
relatively low price tag
and reputation for fuel
ef ciency likely played
a role in propelling the
Corolla to its status as the
most popular automobile
of all time, the vehicle
that is second fddle to the
Corolla might come as a
surprise. With roughly 35
million units sold since its
See TOYOTA, Page 12
How to
change a
flat tire
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 12
Toyota From Page 11
introduction in 1948, the
Ford F-Series truck line
is the second best selling
vehicle of all time. Te
popularity of the F-Series
line of pickup trucks is
perhaps a byproduct of
its various incarnations,
such as the smaller F-150
and the much larger and
more powerful F-450.
Rounding out the top fve
are the Volkswagon Golf,
which has sold 27.5 million
units since it was frst
introduced as the Rabbit
in 1974; its older sibling,
the Volkswagon Beetle,
which has sold 23.5million
units since its introduction
80 years ago; and the Ford
Escort, which has sold 20
million units despite being
discontinued in 2000.
Long gone are the days
when a person hops into
the driver’s seat and only
has AM or FM radio at his
or her disposal. Although
standard radio is still popu-
lar, today’s motorists are
faced with a bevy of options
in an always-evolving “info-
tainment” industry.
Infotainment, also
known as in-car entertain-
ment or ICE, and in-vehicle
infotainment, or IVI, is a
collection of hardware de-
vices installed into cars and
trucks to provide naviga-
tion services and audio and
even visual entertainment.
Many of today’s cars al-
low drivers to map routes
with ease through intricate
navigation systems tied to
location-narrowing satel-
lites. Children can boot up
a favorite DVD and watch
it in the backseat to make a
trip more agreeable, while
passengers can stream sat-
ellite radio and have thou-
sands of diferent musical
options at their fngertips.
And thanks to Bluetooth
or USB connectivity, driv-
ers and passengers alike can
verbally message friends
and family by linking their
phones to car computer sys-
tems. While many of these
infotainment sources are
channeled through a smart-
phone, even that technol-
ogy is changing.
General Motors is the
frst major automaker to an-
nounce that most of their
2015 vehicles will ofer
embedded 4G modems for
constant connectivity. Tis
eliminates the need to pair
infotainment systems with
a phone and wait for a con-
nection. Tis may put on-
line radio on par with what
is available at home or via
wireless hot spots.
Apple recently started
bringing a special version
of its Siri -- a speech-recog-
nition assistant that is built
into iPhones and other
products -- into cars. Siri in-
tegration will be coming to
at least nine automakers in
the future, including BMW,
General Motors, Mercedes-
Benz, Land-Rover, Jaguar,
Audi, Toyota, Chrysler, and
Honda. Other manufactur-
ers, like Ford, which already
has a Microsof-based Sync,
have their own voice-recog-
nition sofware that ties to a
larger information “cloud.”
From ordering dinner to
See SYSTEM Page 13
Vehicle infotainment systems
change the world of driving
Wapakoneta
419-738-8134
315 E. Auglaize St.
St. Marys
419-394-2345
415 S. Wayne St.
www.speckmanauto.com
Power That
Moves You.
The Power Behind
Performance
Automotive, Marine & RV,
Lawn & Garden and
Commercial Farm Batteries
B
r
in
g
th
is
a
d
in
fo
r
1
0
%
O
f
f
e
x
p
. 1
0
/3
1
/1
3
Made in
Fremont, Ohio
The in-dash
infotainment
system in the
Ford Fusion.
Photo courtesy
of Ford Motor
Company.
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 13
cuing up movies, infotain-
ment ofers drivers many
benefts. But on the oppo-
site end of the spectrum,
such systems can pose a po-
tentially dangerous distrac-
tion.
A AAA study points out
that there really isn’t a fully
safe infotainment system.
Of all the typical in-car ac-
tivities studied by AAA,
speech-to-text systems were
found to be the most cog-
nitively distracting. When
assigned a specifc numeric
rating by the AAA Foun-
dation for Traf c Safety,
with 1.0 being no distrac-
tion at all, listening to the
radio earned a 1.21 rating,
talking on a phone ranked
2.45, while listening to and
responding to email using
speech-to-text technology
received a rating of 3.06.
AAA’s president and
CEO, Robert Darbelnet,
says that text-to-speech ca-
pability in cars and many
other infotainment features
could present a safety crisis.
“It’s time to consider lim-
iting new and potentially
dangerous mental distrac-
tions built into cars, par-
ticularly with the common
public misperception that
hands-free means risk-free,”
says Darbelnet.
With the ability to send
and receive tweets, update
social media sites, get direc-
tions, and make restaurant
reservations all through a
vehicle’s infotainment sys-
tem, drivers have many
features at their disposal. It
remains to be seen if these
features will be a boon to
drivers or result in more dis-
tracted driving.
Systems From Page 12
W
E
P
U
T
T
H
E
P
R
ID
E
IN
Y
O
U
R
R
ID
E
519 W. Market St.
Lima, Ohio 45801
M-Sat 8-5:30
419-229-3807
F
r
a
n
k
s
A
u
t
o
W
a
s
h
a
n
d
D
e
t
a
ilin
g
(NAPSI)—It’s a new
day for diesel engines.
Tat’s the word from ex-
perts who say improve-
ments in diesel technology
and fuel composition have
made diesel vehicles more
appealing to a broader
group of consumers.
Because of these im-
provements, people who
choose diesel vehicles re-
port beter gas mileage and
increased torque. Plus, die-
sel vehicles typically hold
their value in the resale
market beter than those
with gasoline-powered en-
gines.
While in the past many
thought that you could
not use a synthetic oil in
a diesel engine, that is not
the case. Today’s diesel ve-
hicles can beneft from the
same improvements in per-
formance and protection
that a premium synthetic
motor oil, such as Royal
Purple, ofers gas-powered
vehicles.
COMMON
QUESTIONS
To help, here are some
answers to common ques-
tions about using a syn-
thetic oil in a diesel vehicle.
• Is it possible to run
synthetic for one oil change
and then switch back to
mineral oil? Yes. Most syn-
thetic oils including Royal
Purple are compatible with
o t h e r mi n e r a l a n d
See OIL Page 16
Diesel engines
and premium
synthetic oils
Today’s diesel vehicles can benefit from the improvements
in performance and protection offered by a premium
synthetic motor oil.
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 14
(NAPSI)--When you
need to haul stuff for
work or DIY projects
around the yard, a pick-
up truck is invaluable.
The downfall of pickup
trucks is the lack of se-
cure storage and ability
to carry longer items.
Truck boxes and racks
are a perfect solution for
these challenges.
TRUCK RACK
FACTS
For the workman
looking for tough, well-
built storage and carry-
ing solutions, there are
many options on the
market. Here are some
features to look for when
you are in the market:
• Because your truck
will be exposed to the
elements, look for items
made of aluminum. Not
only are aluminum prod-
ucts rust resistant, they
are much lighter without
compromising strength.
Traditional steel truck
racks can weigh up to
200 pounds, eating up
a significant portion of
the truck bed’s weight
capacity and decreasing
gas mileage.
• For a higher-quality
finish and more style,
look for racks and boxes
that have been powder
coated. This will also
provide longer life to
these products.
• Because of their sur-
face area, look for racks
that are aerodynam-
ic. This helps to slice
through the wind and
keep any wind noise to a
minimum.
• Some racks are
equipped with dual T-
slot channels in cross-
bars, enabling you to
mount accessories on
the top or bottom of the
crossbar and store things
below the rack.
• Only some of the
many options you see
on shelves and online
are made in the U.S. A.,
which many people pre-
fer.
BEST CHESTS
In addition, you can
improve your truck’s
storage capacity with
lightweight aluminum
or tough steel util-
ity chests, boxes, under-
mount cases and even
special cages for trans-
porting dogs.
LOADING TIPS
Once your truck is
fully equipped, loading
it up can be easier if you
heed six hints:
1. Load the heaviest
items first, in front and
on the floor.
2. Load lightest items
last, on the top and to
the rear.
3. Pack all items close-
ly and firmly.
4. Secure partial loads
with straps, as close to
the front of the cargo
area as possible.
5. Never load cargo on
the outside of the truck.
6. Always be sure the
cargo door is closed and
latched securely.
Learn More
For further facts on
truck racks and boxes,
go to www.UWSTA.com
and www.TracRac.com
or call (800) 432-4685.
Rack up some
extra space
on your vehicle
KEITH’S
SERVICE
CENTER
220 N. Pine Street
St. Marys, Ohio 45885
419-394-8488
Your
Car Care
Headquarters
Complete Auto &
Towing Service
Your truck may work as hard as you but a simple addition
can help it do even more.
Towing You Out of
Trouble Since 1926
We hope you never get stuck with car trouble, but if
you do, it’s good to know we’re here to help 24 hours
a day, 7 days a week. Call us anytime!
NELSON'S BODY SHOP
800 S. Wayne St. • St. Marys, OH • 419-394-3411
• 24 Hour Wrecker Service
• Collision Repair
• Radiator Repair
• Towing of R.V.’s, Motorcycles,
Cars, Vans, Trucks
• Dock-side Boat Recovery
• Interstate Batteries
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Major Credit Cards Accepted
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Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 15
(NAPSI)—For many
motorists, the batery is a
case of under hood, out of
mind until they’re stranded
by a dead batery, which
can be inconvenient and
even dangerous—but this
doesn’t have to happen to
you. Look for such signs
that the batery is failing as
the headlamps look dim at
idle and brighten when you
rev the engine or the starter
groans and turns slowly,
barely starting the car.
PRESERVING
THE BATERY
While no batery lives
forever, these tips can help
keep yours cranking:
• Keep it clean. Even
on today’s sealed bateries,
corrosion on the posts and
terminals can compromise
performance. Your service
technician can clean it or
you can. With the car of,
loosen and remove the
negative cable, then the red
positive cable. Use a brass-
wire batery brush dipped
in a paste of baking soda
and water. Rinse thorough-
ly with water, preferably dis-
tilled. Reinstall the cables,
positive frst, and coat the
terminals and clamps with
See BATTERY Page 16
Care for your
battery today so
it can care for
you later
Batteries wear out for many reasons, including age,
extreme conditions, corrosion, frequent short trips and
long periods of no use, but they rarely die overnight.
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Fall Car CARE
Page 16
synthetic oils. You will
want to check the label
on the manufacturer’s
botle for confrmation.
• What is the difer-
ence between 5W-40
and 15W-40 for die-
sel engines? Assum-
ing they are American
Petroleum Institute
(API) licensed (CI-4,
CJ-4, etc.), both are ef-
fective SAE 40 weight
oils. As the oil cools
from engine operat-
ing temperature, the
5W-40 will thicken less
than the 15W-40. Te
smaller the frst num-
ber of the viscosity, the
beter the fuid fows
when cold.
Depending on the
age of your engine, old-
er diesel engines may
see a slight increase in
oil consumption with
lighter oil.
• Do you need to
adjust the viscos-
ity of your oil based
on where you live?
Sometimes. Te way
you use your vehicle is
also a factor. In general,
many auto manufactur-
ers recommend an “all
temperature” viscosity.
Your owner’s manual
will indicate which “all
temperature” oil is rec-
ommended for your
vehicle and location.
• What about pre-
mium oil flters? It’s a
good idea to use a pre-
mium oil flter in tan-
dem with a synthetic
oil. Oil flters prevent
contaminants from cir-
culating through the
system, causing dam-
age. Premium oil flters
ofer superior fltration
media and internal and
structural components
made of high-quality
material.
If you’re considering
purchasing a diesel ve-
hicle, don’t forget that
maintaining the vehicle
is key.
For more informa-
tion, visit www.royal-
purpleconsumer.com.
a thin grease to prevent
new corrosion.
• Don’t run it down.
Ensure that all lights
and other electronics
are turned of when
the car isn’t being driv-
en. If you do drain the
batery and decide to
jump-start your car,
carefully follow the
instructions in your
owner’s manual to
avoid damaging your
car as well as the run-
ning vehicle. Wear gog-
gles and remove your
scarf, tie and jewelry.
Today’s average
car has 20 or more
onboard computers.
Connecting a posi-
tive cable to a negative
terminal—or vice ver-
sa—can cause an ex-
pensive electrical short
that could destroy one
or more of the comput-
ers.
• Have your batery
checked. Your service
technician can per-
form a load test, which
provides a snapshot of
how much life is lef in
the batery. He or she
may also check to en-
sure that your alterna-
tor is charging the bat-
tery properly.
• Remove the bat-
tery if a vehicle is go-
ing to sit idle for more
than 30 days.
REPLACING THE
BATERY
If your batery needs
replacing, consider
this: ACDelco bater-
ies provide some of the
best and easiest-to-un-
derstand free replace-
ment warranties in
the industry. Tere are
choices for all models,
budgets and priorities.
In addition, the com-
pany’s alternators are
100 percent perfor-
mance and reliability
tested. Customers who
have these things in-
stalled by a member of
the ACDelco Profes-
sional Service Center
program qualify for a
nationwide, 12-month,
12,000-mile limited
warranty on parts and
labor and roadside as-
sistance.
LEARN MORE
To fnd a nearby
shop or further facts
and tips, visit www.
acdelco.com.
Oil From Page 13
Battery From Page 15
Did you know?
Motorists who still adhere to
the old standard of changing
their vehicles’ oil every 3,000
miles are likely wasting their
money. Te majority of today’s
auto manufacturers now build
vehicles that can go twice as
long, if not longer, between
oil changes. Many automakers
now call for oil changes every
7,500 miles, and some go even
further, recommending oil
changes every 10,000 miles.
Some vehicles can even go as
long as 15,000 miles before
needing an oil change. Vehicle
owners should consult their
owner’s manuals for advice
on how ofen their vehicles’
oil should be changed. When
establishing an oil change
schedule for their vehicles,
many drivers are hesitant to
abandon the conventional
3,000 mile interval schedule
that was long espoused
by the auto industry. But
advancements in technology
have allowed manufacturers to
recommend longer intervals
between oil changes, which
benefts motorists’ botom lines
and even the environment.
Rather than needlessly wasting
perfectly goodoil every 3,000
miles, in many instances
motorists can now continue
to use that oil twice as long, if
not longer, reducing waste-oil
dumping as a result. When
consulting an owner’s manual
for recommended oil change
intervals, owners should resist
the temptation to follow the
“severe” schedules listed in
many owner’s manuals. Such
schedules are rarely applicable
under normal circumstances,
and only serve to waste drivers’
money and oil.
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
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