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Updated: 55 min 23 sec ago

Do More With Less

8 hours 1 min ago
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - It's not easy being green. Much of what we purchase to feed our daily habits comes in extraneous packaging better suited to surgery than snacking.

While growing eco-consciousness has yielded no shortage of products to help you avoid wastefulness, the simplest solution is to find ways to do it yourself -- and the following products are cleverly designed to help you do just that.

Problem: Using too many disposable cups.

Solution: Canning jar and a Cuppow drinking lid. From the water cooler to the café, bringing your own cup reduces your footprint without sacrificing your favorite routine.

Available at cuppow.com, $8.99 (free domestic shipping).

Problem: Taking expensive coffee to go.

Solution: CoffeeSock Pour-Over Coffee Filters. Buying your daily cup can add up to more than $1,000 a year, but brewing it yourself can keep that total under $100. A simple pour-over set-up with a reusable organic cotton filter from CoffeeSock Co. gives you the same great taste with none of the waste.

Available at Whole Foods Market, $9.99-$12.99.

Problem: Over-packaged junk food snacks.

Solution: Wide-mouth canning jar with a BNTO jar lunchbox adapter. Convenience comes with a hefty cost at the grocery store, and nothing beats making your own snacks for a fraction of the price. Reusable products help you skip the expensive, over-packaged junk and focus on healthy options while saving money and the environment -- one treat at a time.

Available at BNTO.com, $8.99 (with free domestic shipping).

New Treatment for Undiagnosed Sports Injuries -- From Your Dentist

8 hours 4 min ago
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - Sports-related injuries are common and, when an athlete is hurt, care follows a proven, long-standing protocol of rehabilitation. But what happens when impact occurs to the head, face or jaw, and -- at the time -- no immediate injury is diagnosed?

Weeks, months or even years later, many of these players begin to experience headaches, TMJ/D, migraines, vertigo or tinnitus -- estimated to impact 50 million people in the U.S. to some degree.

"Undiagnosed head trauma from sports injuries -- or other types of impact, including minor car accidents -- is one of the most common causes we see of chronic headaches, migraine, tinnitus and vertigo," says Dr. Ben Burris, an orthodontist with 28 clinics in Arkansas.

Now, these long-term and sometimes debilitating conditions can often be resolved with a painless, non-invasive treatment without drugs or needles -- and all at the dentist's office.

"For over three years, we have been able to help patients with conditions caused by sports injuries," says Dr. Tad Morgan of Tyler, Texas. "If you damaged your knee or shoulder, you would go to the sports medicine clinic for rehab. With injuries to the head, face or jaw, rehab was unavailable until the advent of TruDenta care."

Once diagnosed using a painless, digitally enhanced process, patients receive treatment through a proprietary combination of FDA-cleared, low-level laser therapy, therapeutic ultrasound and other modalities. Each of these was originally developed by MDs in sports medicine to speed the healing of joints and force-related traumas. The TruDenta system can quickly resolve issues in the head, neck, face and jaw, which people may have suffered for years.

"Many of our patients with chronic headaches and migraines are females who have played sports -- soccer, gymnastics or even cycling," says Dr. Richard Hughes of Sandy, Utah. "The common denominator is some form of undiagnosed head trauma which was not properly rehabilitated and resulted in long-term painful symptoms."

TruDenta doctors report rapidly resolving these issues for the majority of patients with long-lasting results. Care is often covered by medical insurance, and TruDenta doctors provide a free consultation.

"We are excited to help these patients in 12 weeks or less without drugs or needles," says Dr. Jeffrey Mastroianni of Glen Carbon, Illinois. "It is truly life-changing for many."

To download the free e-book "Start Living Pain Free," visit www.TruDenta.com/NUSA or call 844-202-2651.

Beat the Crowds: Visit Europe During the Shoulder Seasons

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 15:06
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - With the dollar stronger against the euro than it has been in years, many Americans are considering a European vacation this year. More than 11.4 million Americans visited Europe in 2014, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce, which predicts greater numbers in 2015.

More importantly, over half of those Americans traveled in the summer, contributing to crowded museums, attractions and restaurants during the hottest time of the year. To avoid the crowds and to take advantage of milder weather, savvy travelers are beginning to plan their European vacations during one of two "shoulder seasons."

Shoulder seasons run from April until early June and from mid-September to November, and typically are characterized by thinner crowds, comfortable temperatures and lower prices. With fewer tourists comes better access to café culture, world-class museums and historical sites. Less-pressed locals can take more time to offer recommendations, and tour groups are more intimate, enabling everyone to have a more relaxed experience.

While most of the region is temperate during shoulder seasons, the southern and eastern Mediterranean are the sunniest, resembling the warm climate of Southern California. Travelers can still enjoy a swim in the sea in Greece, Croatia and Ibiza as late as October.

For a European vacation that's not a classic "If it's Tuesday this must be Brussels" experience, consider a cruise on one of Star Clippers' authentic tall ships. Besides unpacking just once while visiting multiple countries, the ships sail throughout the Mediterranean from April to November, visiting Europe's most popular cities and smaller ports inaccessible to large cruise ships.

Onboard, the intimate, yacht-like ambience and casual, convivial atmosphere combine to create a unique experience complemented by continental cuisine and a relaxing European pace.

For more information, visit the website www.starclippers.com.

8 Tips to Selecting Colors for Your Home's Exterior

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 11:31
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - You've no doubt driven down a street, seen a house, and thought, "Yikes! What were they thinking?"

Colors can evoke a visceral response, especially on home exteriors. At once both personal and public, colors make a first impression, can accentuate attributes and soften flaws and offer a glimpse into your personality.

"Homeowners can be influenced by many sources -- friends and neighbors, magazines, TV shows or the guy at the hardware store -- so you'll need to be careful you're not just chasing the latest trend; otherwise, your house might be the one that people end up rolling their eyes at," says PBS home improvement expert Vicki Payne.

Payne says you'll be happy for years to come by following eight tips on selecting colors for your home's exterior:

1. Deciding between bright and cheerful colors or deep, rich earth tones will influence all other decisions.

2. Pick colors that will blend in with your surroundings.

3. Make sure your choices in siding and trim don't clash with materials you are not going to replace, such as roof shingles, brick, stone and tile.

4. The size and lot location of your house matter. Light colors can make a house look bigger, and dark colors can make it look smaller.

5. Landscaping will continue to grow and change colors as the seasons change, so trees, shrubs and flowering gardens need to be considered.

6. Use neutral colors to de-emphasize things such as an air conditioning unit or gutters and downspouts, and use contrasting or accent colors to highlight things such as architectural detailing, porch railings, windows and front doors.

7. Computer visualizers can give a general idea of what colors will look like, but large swatches (about 2 by 3 feet) give a truer look at what colors might actually look like on your home. (Take a look at the swatches at different times of day. The colors will look different as the intensity of the sunlight changes.)

8. Make it last. Who wants to invest thousands of dollars every few years to re-paint? An alternative is pre-painted planks, but their finishes degrade just like paint. Better are cladding products that are certified and warranted to retain their color over their lifespan. Vinyl and other polymeric siding manufactures incorporate color at the front end of production -- actually blending the pigment into the formulation. The color can't chip, pit or peel, giving homeowners peace of mind that they won't have to paint or repair the finish. And just like the leading paint manufactures, vinyl siding, soffit, trim and accessories come in an enormous number of colors -- from classic lighter colors to deep barn reds, hunter and sage greens, deep blues and more.

"Keeping your home's exterior looking fresh and timely doesn't have to be challenging," Payne says.

For more information about certified vinyl siding, visit www.vinylsiding.org.

Building a Better Bridge From Hospital to Home Health Care

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 11:26
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - There are many things that American health care professionals do well, but transitioning patients from hospital to home still isn't one of them.

From anxiety about at-home care to confusion with instructions and medications, to lack of appropriate equipment, coupled with little to no communication between doctors and patients, it's no wonder that hospital readmission rates remain at an all time high, according to a 2012 report from the Alliance of Community Health Plans.

A Pittsburgh-based health care services company, however, believes this doesn't have to be the case. Instead, a new program by AdvaCare is helping patients and doctors come together.

"By becoming an advocate for both patients and physician's, AdvaCare has found a way to bridge treatment for patients from hospital to home and help reduce overall health care costs," said AdvaCare Home Services President Tammy Zelenko.

Zelenko noted that the Patient Partner Program, which recently launched, decreases health care costs for patients by reducing the number of hospital readmissions, emergency room visits, and additional health complications that can occur during the hospital-to-home transition.

No small undertaking, but a necessary one since, according to the report, the U.S. loses $26 billion annually in Medicare readmissions, which means that AdvaCare's program could be just what the doctor ordered.

And if insurance won't cover the cost of a home health care provider, be prepared for some sticker shock. According to disabled-world.com, depending on what city you live in, the average out-of-pocket expense of hiring a home health care aide is $29 an hour or $18,000 a year for someone to come in three times a week for 12 months. In Los Angeles, the price tag goes up to $50 per hour.

For its part, AdvaCare helps patients with the transition from hospital to home by monitoring its patients and providing detailed, individualized patient care plans and in-home assessments.

"The program offers physicians and doctors an additional route that helps save lives and money," Zelenko said. "The focus is not only to help patients adjust to their diagnoses, but to make lifestyle changes, and educate them on their chronic diseases. Through this level of dedication, AdvaCare is helping hospitals avoid costly readmission penalties, allowing more involved patients to better manage their healthcare," she said.

For more information, visit www.advacarehsppp.com.

This Year, Make a Goal to Contribute More to Your 401(k)

Mon, 03/02/2015 - 14:42
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - Are you participating in an employer-sponsored retirement plan? If your company has one, consider yourself fortunate. But if you've been ignoring whatever your company is offering, it's time to get the facts.

A good retirement plan will allow you to defer taxes on whatever you contribute to your 401(k) account until you begin to withdraw money, presumably in your retirement. The amount of money you contribute is deducted from your salary when Uncle Sam is tallying up your taxable income for the year. Granted, you won't see the money you contribute until you retire, but committing to a plan like this is one way of both saving on taxes and forcing yourself to save for the future.

If your company offers any kind of a "match," meaning it will throw in some money to match your contribution at a certain proportion, you are definitely leaving money on the table by not participating. For example, a company may match 50 cents on one dollar up to 4 percent of pay -- yours could be better or worse.

One primary reason a retirement account is such a good idea is compounding interest. Add earned interest to the money you are contributing, plus an employer match, deduct the amount contributed from your taxable income, and you're well ahead of the game.

Most 401(k) plans allow you to choose how to invest your money. The plan administrator provides a choice of investments, which may include cash equivalents, bonds, stocks or a mix. When choosing your investments, you can decide exactly how aggressive or conservative you wish to be.

IRS increased the contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k) plans from $17,500 in 2014 to $18,000 for tax year 2015. The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in 401(k) plans increased from $5,500 to $6,000, which is motivating to many baby boomers who are behind in saving for retirement.

Sitting down with a tax professional to determine what you can do to minimize your tax burden this year and take advantage of every tax deduction and credit available to you just makes good sense. A licensed tax professional can help. Enrolled agents ("EAs") are licensed by the U.S. Department of Treasury after passing a stringent three-part exam on taxation. They must complete IRS-approved continuing education to keep the license. You can locate an EA in your area using the "Find an EA" directory at www.naea.org.

Giving the Elderly a Lift -- In Their Home

Fri, 02/27/2015 - 14:45
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - Although home may be where the heart is, for older people, it may not be where they are able to stay.

This need (and recognition) to downsize, yet not wanting to because of the memories associated with the home (after all, it's where they have lived for decades and may have raised their families), can be a problem. It may also be impractical due to today's still sluggish housing market.

So, what to do? Instead, you might want to consider a stairlift to make your current home more practical.

While there are a whole host of reasons to install a stairlift, the most common is that someone has become too infirm to walk up and down the stairs because of age, illness or injury.

For Cornelius Rice, 80, of Wilkins, Pennsylvania, it took a nasty fall to admit he needed help from a stair lift to deal with his balance problem.

"[A stairlift] makes it convenient for me to get around, and makes it easy on the wife," Rice told the Pittsburgh-Post Gazette in an interview. "She doesn't have to take me here or there now, or be lifting me."

Unlike chair lifts of old, new models like those sold by Orlando-based Acorn Stairlifts are powered by two small 12-volt batteries under the seat or by regular house current. The chair and built-in footrest typically fold up when not in use, allowing for easy passage on the stairs. All lifts have sensors around the perimeter of the foot platform that will stop the lift when a sensor is triggered -- be it by a child's toy, a pet or a foot that has slipped off the platform.

For Tim McCool, VP of Sales and Marketing for Acorn, having a built in stairlift makes sense for the elderly.

"When I first started with Acorn Stairlifts over 10 years ago as a sales rep, one of my first customer interactions was with a woman suffering from ALS," said McCool. "She had to be carried up the stairs just to use the restroom. I talked with her for over an hour, and it's stuck with me all these years, and it's why I'm so committed to what we do to improve people's lives."

The biggest challenge, say experts, is getting older folks to admit they need one. Once installed, however, many find they wished they'd done it earlier, said one consultant, who added that older people sometimes don't want to spend the money on this kind of thing because then they have to admit they have a disability.

For more information, visit www.acornstairlifts.com.

4-H Grown: Alumni Asked to Stand Up and Support STEM Education

Wed, 02/25/2015 - 14:47
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - For almost a decade, there has been a dramatic shift by educators to increase kids' interest in careers in science, technology, engineering and math fields (STEM).

In fact, one of America's largest youth-development organizations (it's been around for almost 115 years), 4-H, along with HughesNet, the leading satellite Internet service provider, are throwing their collective weight behind 4-H Grown -- an interactive campaign that invites the estimated 25 million 4-H alumni across the U.S. to help direct sponsorship funding to their state by checking in at www.4-h.org/4hgrown/, tagging friends, and casting votes to bring more science innovation experiences to youth in their communities.

Through 4-H Grown, the two organizations hope to bring STEM learning experiences to youth across the country, including small communities where resources for interactive learning may be limited.

"In our first year of partnership, National 4-H Council and HughesNet helped thousands of young people experience the excitement of STEM, [and] I am thrilled that our new 2015 program will engage even more young people and expand our reach to 4-H alumni to show STEM can be rewarding and fun," says Jennifer Sirangelo, president and CEO, National 4-H Council.

The partnership is also giving a $10,000 "Innovation Incubator" Science Sponsorship to the state with the largest number of votes. This sponsorship is new and requires youth across the nation to design innovative science solutions to solve real community challenges. States compete to receive a science sponsorship. Additionally, two young innovators will be selected to receive an all-expense-paid trip to the flagship 4-H National Youth Science Day event in Washington, D.C., where they will participate in the world's largest youth-led science experiment.

"Exposing thousands of children to the excitement of STEM is priceless," says Mike Cook, senior vice president, Hughes North America Division. "We're thrilled to continue our work with 4-H to make a difference in kids' lives."

For more information, or to support your state in 4-H Grown, visit www.4-h.org/4hgrown.

Haven't Tried Sardines? Try These

Tue, 02/24/2015 - 15:10
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - Sardines are consistently rated as the most nutritious and environmentally friendly fish you can eat, and yet some people remain suspicious. "Wait! They have bones and scales?"

Well, yes, most premium sardines have bones -- which melt away during processing, which is why they have more calcium per serving than a glass of milk. And yes, they do have scales, though they're too tiny to notice. So despite the little fish's sustainability and wealth of protein, calcium and Vitamin D -- and the fact that sardines contain roughly 2,000 mg of omega-3s per 3.75-ounce serving -- many people consider sardines a non-starter.

But sardine makers, like Norway-based King Oscar, also offer what is known as "skinless and boneless" sardines, a potential game-changer for the tiny fish.

John Engle, president of King Oscar USA, says that skinless and boneless sardines are another kettle of fish entirely. "Skinless and boneless sardines are actually an entirely different species of fish from our traditional 'brisling' sardine. They're slightly larger, and fished from different waters, which allows us to remove the skin and bones from the fish and bring a totally different taste and texture to the can, qualities very similar to tuna."

It also allows sardine companies to experiment with new flavors and even recipes. For example, King Oscar's Spanish-Style Sardines are caught off the coast of Morocco and combined with olive oil, red peppers, pickled cucumbers, carrot and a dash of salt and a hint of chili flavor to make for a new twist on a time-tested food, and even potentially begin to change people's perception of sardines.

"People eat seafood in a can by the millions -- just look at tuna," said Engle. "I think that by introducing new varieties of skinless and boneless sardines, it'll open up the possibility of eating sardines to people who have heard that they're good for you, but who just haven't been able to get past the 'yuck' factor."

One popular food blogger, Kimberly Moore of The Hungry Goddess, is already ahead of the curve. She suggests pairing King Oscar Spanish Style skinless and boneless sardines with paella to put a healthy, savory spin on the rice-based classic.

To see Moore's paella recipe, as well as dozens of other recipes and products, visit kingoscar.com or King Oscar's Facebook page.

10 Tips to Stay Safe During Spring Break

Mon, 02/23/2015 - 14:50
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - It's that time of year again when thousands of college students and young adults will flock to the far reaches of the world for spring break. Wherever your travels take you, it's best to adopt the Boy Scout's motto,"Be Prepared."

The following tips will help you get started.

1. Arrive safely. Traffic death rates are three times higher at night than during the day. This means an all-night drive to Florida or any other sunny locale is not a good idea. If you can't avoid night driving, have someone stay up to talk you.

2. Secure your hotel room. Make sure your door is locked and important belongings like passports and wallets are in the safe. For added security, consider bringing along a portable door stop alarm like that from SABRE, a manufacturer of security products for both law enforcement and the general public. The door stop alarm can alert you if someone tries to break in.

3. Ensure you know the name of your hotel. Memorize the hotel's address, and take a card to give cab drivers (especially if you don't know the language).

4. Protect your personal information. Don't tell new acquaintances your hotel name or room number. You never know who has innocent (or not-so-innocent) intentions.

5. Employ the buddy system. Never leave a party with a stranger, but if you do, consider carrying a pepper gel key ring with you. SABRE offers one for less than $15. It's good for four years, has a 12-foot range and up to 25 bursts.

6. Practice safe drinking. Always have one friend who plans on minimal drinking to look out for everyone and watch cups and glasses as well. Only accept drinks you've watched get made or poured in front of you.

7. Ask for help. If you need help, call yourself. Don't rely on bystanders to call for you.

8. Drink water and wear sunscreen. Too much time in the sun can leave you dehydrated and at risk for sunburn or sun poisoning. Take a water bottle and sunscreen when you go out.

9. Open the lines of communication between students and parents. Providing an itinerary for family members is especially important when traveling overseas. In addition, know where the U.S. embassy or American consulate is in the country where you're headed, and check in often.

10. Travel with your personal protection. Small pepper sprays can be checked through major airlines, and personal alarms can be carried on flights with you. If you're out and about exploring, remember that pepper spray is legal to carry in all 50 states.

For more information, visit www.sabrered.com.

Weatherizing Your Home Can Mean Big Benefits

Mon, 02/23/2015 - 11:23
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - The volatility of Mother Nature this year has served as a reminder that electric and gas bills can get out of hand quickly -- especially when a home isn't properly weatherized.

"The U.S. Department of Energy suggests homeowners spend nearly 50 percent of their utility bills on space heating and cooling, with heating accounting for the largest portion of money spent," said Stephen Wagner, assistant category manager at ShurTech Brands, LLC, the marketers of the Duck brand. "With so much spent, it's important to take measures to save energy and money. Something as simple as weatherizing can help block air leaks and drafts, helping to keep energy bills low."

The good news is that if you haven't already weatherized, it's not too late. The following tips will help prepare your home for not only freezing temperatures but also the warmer summer months:

* Start with the attic. The top of the house tends to be forgotten as a source of energy loss. To combat this, Duck brand Attic Stairway Covers can help seal attic stairway openings by helping to block drafts, saving energy all year round. These pop-up covers are flexible and lightweight, easily repositionable to allow attic access and simple to assemble and install.

* Check the windows. As houses age, window casings loosen and become drafty. To add a barrier between your home and the elements, consider the Roll-On Window Kit from the same brand. The crystal-clear shrink film requires no measuring and provides an airtight seal over interior window frames, creating an insulating air space between the film and window glass.

* Make sure doors are properly sealed. Not only does weatherizing the bottom of doors help prevent drafts, it also protects from dust, insects and pollen during warmer months. Duck brand Double Draft Seal is designed to work on a variety of floor types and has a patented design that offers two layers of protection from drafts -- straps hold the seal in place while it "hugs" the bottom of the door from inside and outside.

* Consider the walls. You might not know this, but energy loss can also come from sources such as electrical outlets and switch plates on exterior walls. Socket Sealers prevent drafts by acting as a buffer between the outside temperatures and your home's interior.

* Fill cracks and gaps. For stationary components, caulk is the appropriate material for filling cracks and gaps. Around windows and doors, weatherstripping, such as Duck brand window and door weatherstrip seals, provides a barrier against the elements, helping to insulate your home. For those who live in extreme temperatures, try a Heavy-Duty Weatherstrip seal made with EPDM rubber.

For more information, visit www.duckbrand.com.

10 Tips for Staying Safe During Spring Break

Fri, 02/20/2015 - 10:25
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - It's that time of year again when thousands of college students and young adults will flock to the far reaches of the world for spring break. Wherever your travels take you, it's best to adopt the Boy Scout's motto,"Be Prepared."

The following tips will help you get started.

1. Arrive safely. Traffic death rates are three times higher at night than during the day. This means an all-night drive to Florida or any other sunny locale is not a good idea. If you can't avoid night driving, have someone stay up to talk you.

2. Secure your hotel room. Make sure your door is locked and important belongings like passports and wallets are in the safe. For added security, consider bringing along a portable door stop alarm like that from SABRE, a manufacturer of security products for both law enforcement and the general public. The door stop alarm can alert you if someone tries to break in.

3. Ensure you know the name of your hotel. Memorize the hotel's address, and take a card to give cab drivers (especially if you don't know the language).

4. Protect your personal information. Don't tell new acquaintances your hotel name or room number. You never know who has innocent (or not-so-innocent) intentions.

5. Employ the buddy system. Never leave a party with a stranger, but if you do, consider carrying a pepper gel key ring with you. SABRE offers one for less than $15. It's good for four years, has a 12-foot range and up to 25 bursts.

6. Practice safe drinking. Always have one friend who plans on minimal drinking to look out for everyone and watch cups and glasses as well. Only accept drinks you've watched get made or poured in front of you.

7. Ask for help. If you need help, call yourself. Don't rely on bystanders to call for you.

8. Drink water and wear sunscreen. Too much time in the sun can leave you dehydrated and at risk for sunburn or sun poisoning. Take a water bottle and sunscreen when you go out.

9. Open the lines of communication between students and parents. Providing an itinerary for family members is especially important when traveling overseas. In addition, know where the U.S. embassy or American consulate is in the country where you're headed, and check in often.

10. Travel with your personal protection. Small pepper sprays can be checked through major airlines, and personal alarms can be carried on flights with you. If you're out and about exploring, remember that pepper spray is legal to carry in all 50 states.

For more information, visit www.sabrered.com.

3 Things to Know Before Ride-Booking a Car

Thu, 02/19/2015 - 07:18

(NewsUSA) - If you were some innocent fleeing a terrorist attack, would you expect to be charged four times the normal cost of a car ride?

Alas, that's what happened to some Uber passengers last December when the "off the charts" demand for a quick escape from anywhere near the 16-hour siege at Sydney, Australia's Lindt Chocolate Café automatically triggered the controversial "surge-pricing" that Uber and other ride-booking services also employ here in the U.S.

Even some of the app-based companies' (former) biggest fans say that's just a fancy term for price gouging. "#Neverforget, #neveragain," read the hashtags celeb Jessica Seinfeld used in Instagramming a receipt for a whopping $415 Uber fare during a recent New York snowstorm. And so many lawmakers across the nation have their own pro-consumer reasons for wanting to crack down on the industry -- lesser players include Lyft and Sidecar -- that you'd almost think the very idea of summoning a ride on a smartphone was Evil Incarnate.

It's your call, but here's what you should know before booking one of those cars:

* Your driver may not have been thoroughly screened. Newspapers have reported numerous cases of ride-booking drivers arrested for allegedly raping or assaulting passengers. But efforts to subject the newbies to the same rigorous background checks as taxi and limousine drivers -- akin to a "Not Welcome" sign for lowlifes -- have been fought by all three services.

"Background screening is a public safety issue," says Gary Buffo, president of the National Limousine Association (www.limo.org). "Competition is a good thing, but everyone needs to play by the same rules."

Uber, for one, has touted what it calls its "industry-leading (vetting) standards." But that claim took a hit last December when prosecutors in California alleged, as part of a consumer protection lawsuit against the company, that their drivers weren't being fingerprinted -- thus making its criminal checks "completely worthless."

* Good luck suing if you're injured. Some ride-booking services allow drivers to carry personal, rather than commercial, insurance. (Hey, they use their own cars.) Testifying at a recent City Council hearing in Buffalo, New York, Kristina Baldwin, of the Property Casualty Insurers Association of America, called that a "serious insurance gap."

* Surge pricing can be a shocker. Uber did reimburse Sydney riders after getting skewered by the media. But New Year's Eve revelers in New York City, learning a lesson in supply and demand, apparently had no such luck. "The most expensive eight minutes of my life," the New York Daily News quoted one angry passenger.

For Advanced Heart Failure Patients, There Is Hope

Wed, 02/18/2015 - 11:29
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - NewsusaInfographic - Advanced heart failure is a serious and deadly disease that needs to be managed and understood. As a progressive disease that is rarely cured, it can get worse over time. That is why it might be time to consider other treatment options -- like LVAD therapy.

See full-sized image here.

5 Easy Tips for Taking Care of Your Heart

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 11:31
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - Northern California native June Auld, 76, leads a very full life. Aside from her day job as a mental health professional, she can be found, with her husband, Glenn, cooking for the homeless, providing foster care to guide dogs or taking walks around their neighborhood.

It was during one of those full days that Auld began experiencing extreme discomfort in her chest. She and her husband went to the emergency department at Kaiser Permanente San Rafael Medical Center, where doctors immediately began running tests. Doctors confirmed that Auld had experienced a heart attack, and placed a stent in a blocked artery.

Auld's decision to seek immediate care at Kaiser Permanente not only saved her life, but saved her from having to undergo more complicated treatment.

"The care Kaiser Permanente gave me was fantastic," Auld said. "The day after I got home, I did my walk like I had never had a heart problem, and I've never had any pain or discomfort since."

Show your heart some love now and throughout the rest of your life with these five simple, healthy aging tips from Marc Jaffe, M.D., clinical leader, Kaiser Permanente Northern California Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program.

How to keep your heart strong:

1. Be sweet. Instead of chocolate, try blueberries or strawberries. These heart-healthy treats are filled with natural antioxidants that can help keep your arteries open.

2. Move to the beat. Grab a partner and do some fancy footwork. Any activity that gets you moving -- like dancing or walking -- can help increase blood circulation, reduce stress and protect your heart.

3. Do your thing. Activities like painting, writing, yoga and meditation can help slow your heart and breathing rates and lower your blood pressure, all of which are good for your body and your heart.

4. Avoid tobacco. If you smoke, join a tobacco-cessation program to help you quit, and talk to your doctor about medications that can help increase your chances of kicking the habit. If you don't smoke, avoiding secondhand smoke may also help protect your heart, lungs and blood vessels.

5. Maintain a healthy weight. If you are overweight, losing as little as 10 pounds can make a difference and lower your risk of heart problems.

Living a healthy lifestyle can help your heart stay strong, so you can live -- and love -- for years to come. See a video about Auld's story on the Kaiser Permanente Care Stories blog. For more information about Kaiser Permanente and heart care, visit kp.org. For questions or advice about a specific condition, talk to your physician.

The Financial Implications of Heart Disease

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 10:35
Five words or less

(NewsUSA) - NewsusaInfographic - Many people share the overly optimistic belief that they are shielded against suffering a heart attack or stroke. But the truth is, no one is immune to life-altering medical events. And, many don't understand the financial implications associated with these health issues. Critical illness insurance can help cover costs resulting from an unexpected illness.

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Labels Shed Light on Your Perfect Bulb

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 10:32
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(NewsUSA) - In today's health-conscious times, chances are you read the labels of grocery items at the store before tossing them into your cart. And if you've ever accidentally shrunk a favorite sweater, it's a safe bet you check clothing labels before putting them in the washing machine. But when was the last time you checked the label when purchasing light bulbs?

"The labels on light bulb cartons are mandated by the Federal Trade Commission, and like food labels, they are designed with the consumer in mind," says Terry McGowan, director of engineering and technology for the American Lighting Association (ALA).

Light bulb labels answer the question: What kind of performance should you expect from this light bulb when you buy it and install it in your light fixture? In addition to factors like brightness, energy costs and wattage ratings, bulb labels also focus on the light's appearance, which is described in words such as "warm" or "cool" and also in Kelvins.

Kelvins Count

The color you see from light bulbs involves two components.

"The first component," says McGowan, "is what you see when you look at the bulb itself -- that's the overall tint or tone of the light. You might look at the bulb and say that it looks 'cool' or 'warm.' That color characteristic is called 'chromaticity,' and for bulbs used for residential lighting, chromaticity is expressed in Kelvins, such as a bulb of 2700 Kelvins, or 2700K.

"The second component is color rendering," says McGowan, "which is more subtle than chromaticity because it involves much more human judgment about what the eye is seeing. Color rendering, expressed as a number using the Color Rendering Index (CRI), describes how lifelike or natural people and objects appear."

Natural daylight and standard incandescent bulbs have a CRI of 100, with all other light sources being measured against them. For example, if a bulb has a rated CRI of 80 or 90, that means the light from that bulb will not render the colors of objects or people as well as if they were in natural daylight.

New bulb technology, particularly with LED bulbs, means bulbs are available in myriad brightness levels and colors.

An ALA retailer can help you select the perfect light bulb to provide the best color and ambience for your home. To find your closest ALA-member store, go online to americanlightingassoc.com.

Bringing Chiropractic to the Little League

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 10:29

(NewsUSA) - Participating in sports may be a rite of passage for kids, but it's up to parents to recognize, manage and -- yes -- prevent sports-related health conditions and injuries like concussions. One way to help do just that: an evaluation by a doctor of chiropractic, says Stephanie Mills, the recently crowned Ms. America 2014 and herself a chiropractor. To learn more, visit www.F4CP.org/findadoctor.

 

Watch the video at: http://youtu.be/KiJV4otR0IM

Singapore Pastor Kong Hee Maintains Innocence, Gains Support From Leaders

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 10:25
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(NewsUSA) - It is a classic case of "he said, she said."

At the crux of the matter is whether or not charismatic, influential Singapore pastor Kong Hee used millions of dollars from church funds to buy bonds to promote his wife's cross-over music career, as is being contended.

While the prosecution argues that the investment companies and bonds amounted to "shams," Hee maintains that he did nothing wrong. Supporting this claim is his church body, City Harvest, noting that all monies were returned to their coffers with interest, and no funds were lost.

While the case continues to gain attention both in America and abroad, Hee's supporters remain adamant that he is innocent.

"He [Pastor Hee] never did anything illegal, never did anything to the inurement of his own pockets or that of his wife," Pastor A.R. Bernard told the Washington Times in an interview this year. Bernard, an international religious leader based in Brooklyn, N.Y., has been one of Hee's most outspoken and vocal supporters.

Instead, Bernard asserts that the Singapore government is trying to make an example out of Hee and the 20,000-member church that he founded, saying, "Change is taking place in the nation [of Singapore] that is part of a bigger picture."

Bernard is referring to the fact that at least one-third of Singaporeans are Buddhist, while its younger generation is embracing Christianity and Christian churches that are popping up all over that country. This trend, Bernard says, is not sitting well with a government that is accustomed to control and status quo, and has little experience with special interest groups.

Theresa Tan, a spokeswoman for City Harvest, agrees.

"As a church, we believe that God's doing something in Asia, and Singapore is pivotal as a location," she told the Financial Times in an interview last month. "We are at a crossroads to various parts of Asia, so we feel that God's using Singapore in such a way."

For his part, Hee has remained quiet but has told his congregation that he "maintains his integrity ? and will defend that integrity against these charges." Hee continues to preach at City Harvest as a senior pastor.

"Pastor Kong has been a great leader of the church in Singapore and an influence throughout the world," said Pastor Casey Treat, a religious leader at the Christian Faith Center in Washington.

"I have never seen a compromise or unbiblical behavior."

Hee is expected to take the stand in his own defense when the trial resumes this summer.

How Will Individual Shared Responsibility Affect Your Tax Return?

Thu, 02/12/2015 - 13:22
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(NewsUSA) - Unless you've been way out of touch, you probably know that a key part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires that taxpayers have qualifying health care coverage. Those without will need to qualify for an exemption, or pay a penalty. This "Individual Shared Responsibility" provision applies to both individuals and families. So, while preparing your tax return this year, here are some things you ought to know.

If in 2014, you, your spouse and everyone else on your tax return (dependents) had "minimum essential coverage," which includes most employer-sponsored plans, as well as programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP and insurance purchased through the Health Insurance Marketplace, you're in fine shape. Just check the appropriate box that says you are insured for the full year. If there were months that someone on your return had no coverage, that person needs to qualify for an exemption or pay a penalty.

To qualify for an exemption, one of the following situations must exist:

* The individual does not have access to affordable coverage because the minimum annual premium available is more than eight percent of the household income.

* The gap in coverage existed for less than three months.

* The individual qualifies for other exemptions that include a hardship or being a member of a group that is exempt from health coverage (for example, incarcerated inmates or members of a federally recognized Indian tribe).

Without coverage or an exemption, you'll have to pay a penalty for each month you were not insured. This penalty is calculated and reported on your tax return. In general, the payment amount is the greater of 1 percent of your household income over the filing threshold for your filing status, or $95 per person ($47.50 per person under 18 years old). This caps at a family maximum of $285 for 2014.

You'll owe half the annual payment for each month you or another person on your return doesn't have either qualifying health care or an exemption. Sound complicated? Taxes are. That's why so many taxpayers are thrilled to turn their taxes over to a paid preparer.

If that's your plan this year, be careful to make sure your preparer is licensed and required to complete continuing education to keep up with the changing tax code. Enrolled agents ("EAs") are licensed by the U.S. Department of Treasury, must pass an exam administered by IRS and complete IRS-approved continuing education. You can trust your taxes to an EA -- locate one in your area on the searchable "Find an EA" database at www.naea.org.

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